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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > The Cruising Life, by Jim Trefethen, and Cruising Financials
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Thread: The Cruising Life, by Jim Trefethen, and Cruising Financials Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-11-2010 08:07 PM
u4ea
Quote:
Originally Posted by trisstan87 View Post
I don't know how people live the suburbia life.. I suppose if I were very wealthy I could have a different opinion on it. I just want to get up around 25-30K on the max end for a boat and refitting and another 10-20K in the bank and just go. Set sail, leave for the horizon, stop trying to find life and let life find me.
A reasonable way to do it. You will have lots of compatriots! As many "out there" have said, your budget is whatever you've got. And there is nothing about leaving the marina for the ocean that requires that you never earn any more money. Its not hard to earn as you go.
09-02-2010 10:05 PM
trisstan87 I don't know how people live the suburbia life.. I suppose if I were very wealthy I could have a different opinion on it. I just want to get up around 25-30K on the max end for a boat and refitting and another 10-20K in the bank and just go. Set sail, leave for the horizon, stop trying to find life and let life find me.
08-30-2010 05:19 PM
chadmadsen As a new sailor, I can say that I appreciate the breadth and width of this post. Both on topic and off. It has been very informative for a rookie standpoint, with boat purchase and other topics. Thank you for a very good/long/poignant thread.
11-19-2009 10:49 AM
piratessoul Hi, I'm new on here and I have to admit I didn't read every page of this thread but, I'd like to comment on a couple of points.

Security and control.

These were mentioned several times and I'd just like to say that these are relative terms. Life is just a ball that we have no choice in attending. We choose partners and dance to the music that is playing. If we can't follow the melody we sit it out, and anxiously await the next one, or we jump in and take the chance of looking like a fool.

We cannot control the winds of life. We can only adjust our sails. Sometimes our destinations change, due to a berage of un-cooperative weather, and we end up in a situation that seems unsecure and out of control. That is, until that melody becomes familiar.

One thing is for certain; the ball will end. Dance every dance!
11-19-2009 08:54 AM
DalesStar Well first I have to say that Jim Trefethen's book is "his way". I like all the anti-Pardey's views (ie the other side of the coin), it just suggests that there are more than one way to do anything.
Second, the first 2 pages of Chapter 8 "Life aboard" made me laugh for 10 minutes. That's what sent me on this quest. I'm sure everyone has been in that situation at least one time, but his recount of it was great.
I've been a Thoreau follower since I was in the Marines. Seem a bit ironic to my Capitan that I was reading Civil Disobedience and Walden Pond. I went hitching around the states before the Marines. My friend and I were gone for 4 months. Starting from Seattle, going to Wisc., to LA then back to Seattle, Anyway, when we got back it was like we went through a time warp. Everyone was on a different pace than we were. We weren't into time, or our pace changed.
Again, anyway, I'm working on restoring a 1974 33' Morgan OI, refit everything. I'll be finishing it up this winter. My wife and I plan to take off and hopefully find that slow pace again.
I appreciate all of what this forum has to offer and the ability for everyone to share their opinions and experiences. Thank you
Dale
03-16-2009 10:28 PM
wind_magic
Quote:
Originally Posted by SailorGregS View Post
The cost of cruising is variable for many reasons, but building liquid wealth does help alleviate the concerns.
SailorGregS, you are invited to make your way on over to Off Topic and the Market Crash thread, lots of lively discussion there about trading, the economy, etc, you will be very welcome there.
03-16-2009 07:26 PM
Sequitur
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
Michael,
... I am not beating up the warranty. Better to have it then not... but I doubt I would pay any extra for it if you are going to go cruising. That also brings up the concern that since almost everything on the boat ius 12 months, with some items being 24 month warranties, Hunter is carrying the note and eating the rest of those costs. Since they have to make money, they are simply passing that cost to you in one way or another.
Yes, they pass on the cost as the price of the warranty. I forget how much it was, but I thought it very reasonable for the additional 3 to 4 year coverage beyond the warranties on the individual components.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
My point in all of this is that the warranty sounds good, but the reality is that if you are cruising, it doesn't add up to much. Especially when you are dealing with island time. And since you have to buy a spare for EVERYTHING anyways, there is NO WAY I would pay extra for it.
As I said up-thread:
Quote:
I also hear {your} point loud and clear, which is exactly why I have laid-in (or will have by the time we leave in August) an extensive array of spares, and why my starboard aft cabin has been fitted with a serious work bench and will be a well-equipped floating repair and maintenance facility.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
... I am simply asking how much weight you REALLY put into that warranty as a cruiser?? I simply don't put much into it. I certainly am not going to sit around for Catalina to fix my tub when I have things to do and places to go.

Thoughts?

Brian
Nor an I going to sit around for Catalina to fix my tub when I have things to do and places to go; I'm planning on replacing from my spares or repairing using my workshop, and then continuing on to the next port with a Hunter dealer and let the Hunter network sort it out.
03-16-2009 07:03 PM
Sequitur
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielgoldberg View Post
... I hear CD's point loud and clear, but I have to say, if I had that option, I would have taken it (depending on the price I suppose). True, if you're halfway to Bermuda and something breaks you're not getting it fixed until you get there. But once there, I'd much rather have the manufacturer pick up the tab. .... And that's not to mention that if you're coastal cruising, particularly along the U.S. east coast, that kind of warranty would be of serious value. Good for Hunter; that really is an advancement in customer service/relations that I would like to see all builders follow.
I also hear CD's point loud and clear, which is exactly why I have laid-in (or will have by the time we leave in August) an extensive array of spares, and why my starboard aft cabin has been fitted with a serious work bench and will be a well-equipped floating repair and maintenance facility.

There are thirty-five Hunter dealers outside of North America, conveniently dispersed across the globe. For instance, in May-June next year we plan on being in Santiago, Chile, where we'll spend time with the Hunter dealer there, addressing any issues and arisings and doing annual maintenance routines, before heading into Patagonia for a six-month exploration. The following year, depending on where we decide to head after exploring down the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, we can do our annual haul-out with the Hunter dealer in Montevideo or in Durban.
03-16-2009 06:25 PM
danielgoldberg
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sequitur View Post
Dan,
Here is a bit from the Hunter site, so of course, it is biased
That's great stuff. I didn't realize that.

I hear CD's point loud and clear, but I have to say, if I had that option, I would have taken it (depending on the price I suppose). True, if you're halfway to Bermuda and something breaks you're not getting it fixed until you get there. But once there, I'd much rather have the manufacturer pick up the tab. Presumably that warranty covers labor too, but even if it doesn't and covers parts only (and this goes to the price they want for the extended coverage), that still might be worth it. A new fridge/alternator/electric head, etc. ain't cheap. And that's not to mention that if you're coastal cruising, particularly along the U.S. east coast, that kind of warranty would be of serious value. Good for Hunter; that really is an advancement in customer service/relations that I would like to see all builders follow.
03-16-2009 06:20 PM
danielgoldberg
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
Parts failures:

This is certainly not meant to be a testimonial to anything and everything that can happen as a LA/cruiser, but here are my lists of failures as I remember them:

Starter
Alternator
Charger (which took the batteries with it)
Head failure (due to my son and a matchbox car)
Water Pump
Bilge Pump(s)
Lights (running light bulb)
Chartplotter (twice)

How many of those things would have failed at the dock?

Starter, maybe the charger, maybe the bilge pump. The rest would be items you better have a backup part or system for.

What failures have you guys seen? What do you carry as spares? And would a warranty even be worth anything?

Brian
Um, well, uh, gee, you know, well, how do you say politely ... you did buy a Catalina after all, so I'm not sure what you expected.
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