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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Stripping Bottom Paint
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Thread: Stripping Bottom Paint Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-05-2006 01:21 AM
sailingdog Also, you should be aware that some of the hard-coat bottom paints require the boat to be splashed in a certain amount of time after applying the paint. If you do not splash the boat in the required time frame the paint effectively becomes inactivated, and may need to be removed and repainted.
11-04-2006 12:41 PM
SailorMitch
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailormon6
Realistically, I think ablative paints are only good for one year. If you want a bottom paint that will last longer, you need a hard finish paint. Over the long term, ablative paints will save you a lot of labor maintaining the boat.
.
The better ablative paints are advertised as multi-year paints, which also has been my experience with them. How long they last depends on how many coats you put on to begin with. But the ablatives are made to be re-launched from one season to the next as long as there's enough thickness left.

BTW, I should've explained why I have a coat of Trinidad as a base coat with ablative paint on top. The Trinidad is black and the ablative paint is blue. So if I start seeing black show through it's time to apply more ablative. Pettit also recommended Trinidad as the base paint over the epoxy barrier boat because the Trinidad adheres very well.

But after tiller vs. wheel, bottom paint probably is one of the most personal topics you'll find on these boards. Everybody has their favorite for their local waters. (Note I am not getting into the wing vs. bulb keel thing!)
11-04-2006 12:31 PM
SailinJay Thanks to all for the information. I had not thought about just applying two more coats of paint. Unless I do have cracking and/or peeling, that will be the easiest solution.
11-04-2006 09:45 AM
Sailormon6 Aside from environmental issues, the type of bottom paint you use should depend on how you use and maintain your boat.

Hard bottom paints last longer than ablatives, but, after you have applied them for a period of years, they build up a thick coat of old paint that eventually starts to crack and peel. When that happens, you need to consider stripping all the old paint off the bottom and start over again. If you do a good job of sanding it between each coat, and if you apply each coat properly, you might be able to go nearly 20 years before you strip it. If not, you might have to strip it much sooner.

Realistically, I think ablative paints are only good for one year. If you want a bottom paint that will last longer, you need a hard finish paint. Over the long term, ablative paints will save you a lot of labor maintaining the boat.

If you keep your boat on the hard during the off-season, then you can give your bottom a light sanding in the spring, apply a coat or two of ablative paint, and you'll be good for the season. If you keep the boat in the water for 2-3 seasons, then you have to use a hard finish paint.

Unless you're a serious racer, the bottom only needs to be stripped when it accumulates such a thick layer of old paint that it starts to crack and peel. If you have only put a couple of coats of paint on it since the last time you stripped it, it's unlikely that it needs to be stripped again, unless you got a bad batch of paint or didn't apply it properly, according to the manufacturer's instructions..
11-03-2006 11:59 PM
Fstbttms
Quote:
Originally Posted by SailorMitch
Depending on the conditions where you keep your boat, you may very well find you don't need to do very much in-water cleaning with ablatives. That has been my experience.
Good point. Boats that live a more brackish environment (as I suspect many in the Cheasapeake region do) may indeed do better with an ablative than boats that live in a marine environment. None-the-less, ablatives are more harmfull to the environment than epoxies, regardless of where they are used.
11-03-2006 02:57 PM
SailorMitch
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fstbttms
Before you commit to using an ablative over a modified epoxy, consider the following. You will not get superior anti fouling performance, you will be causing more harm to the environment and the paint will not stand up as well to in-water cleaning. Stay with Trinidad, IMHO.
The process I outlined of applying an ablative over a base coat of Trinidad is what Pettit suggested I do when I stripped my bottom and applied an epoxy barrier coat two years ago. I followed their advice and am pleased with the results. Additionally, I have used Pettit Ultima SR (and its predecessors) for years here in the Chesapeake with very good results. Depending on the conditions where you keep your boat, you may very well find you don't need to do very much in-water cleaning with ablatives. That has been my experience. A bonus is that you won't get a build-up of hard paint over the years that will require a messy stripping job.

My $.02 -- or does that make it $.04 now?
11-03-2006 11:44 AM
dustdevil38
I've tried Ready Strip

Hi-

I've used one of the Pratical Sailor test chemicals, Ready Strip. It did OK on the ablative topcoat, but was not near so effective on the underlying hard paint. Ready Strip softens the gellcoat a bit, so you need to let the surface dry out for a day or two after stripping and washing. Still had a lot of sanding to get it the rest off. I found this stuff at the local lumber yard for $28/gallon.

I agree with previous posts: unless you really need to get it all off, I'd sand the Trinidad and apply two coats of a good ablative.

sam
11-03-2006 09:17 AM
Gary M The strippers work pretty well. I just took 20 years worth off a 30 footer that I purchased less than a year ago. That much is very nasty. If you just have 2-3 coats the marine strippers will work well. You need rubber gloves and a cheap rain coat. A full mask is a good idea or use monogogles and be careful.

A wide stripper scrapper works well and also a pull scraper adds variety. I used an old large coffee can and after each scrape put it directly into the can. You will likely have to put a plastic sheet down to catch some of it.

Have Fun
Gary
11-03-2006 12:27 AM
Fstbttms
Quote:
Originally Posted by SailorMitch
I partially agree with Gene T -- why remove the two coats of Trinidad assuming it is in sound shape? I'd repaint, but using an ablative so that you won't get a build up of layers of paint in the future.
Before you commit to using an ablative over a modified epoxy, consider the following. You will not get superior anti fouling performance, you will be causing more harm to the environment and the paint will not stand up as well to in-water cleaning. Stay with Trinidad, IMHO.
11-02-2006 11:37 PM
SailorMitch I partially agree with Gene T -- why remove the two coats of Trinidad assuming it is in sound shape? I'd repaint, but using an ablative so that you won't get a build up of layers of paint in the future.

But to answer your question if you really, really want to remove that paint: yes, I have used chemicals twice and they work very well. Depending on the brand you use, apply it, wait the stated time for it to work, test a patch to see if it comes off easily, if not wait a bit longer. I use plastic scrapers from Home Despot.
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