SailNet Community - Reply to Topic
Thread: Roll-up solar panels Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-17-2016 06:14 PM
pdqaltair
Re: Roll-up solar panels

Velcro seem obvious. I'd go with 3M Dual Lock.
08-17-2016 05:41 PM
mitiempo
Re: Roll-up solar panels

First of all this is a very old thread.

A flexible panel (not roll-up) is 21" x 42" and should produce between 5.6 and 7 amps depending on controller.

Roll-up panels are not very efficient.
08-17-2016 02:00 AM
robertbeegel
Re: Roll-up solar panels

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
I am going to cruise more time and I want to stay away from marinas so I need some renewable energy source and I want to have solar panels.

Solar panels in what a boat concerns are not very efficient unless you have ugly, expensive and heavy metal structures to orient them. I donít want that.

There is another way that the technology made available and that are not yet being purposely used on sail boats, I mean roll-up panels. They are sturdy (you can walk over), flexible and can be fixed anywhere and easily re-fixed in another position and when the weather is not fine you can just roll them up and store them in minutes.

I never saw them advertised for specific boat use and the ones I find are smaller and less powerful than what I want. The most approximated one is this one from solar sphere: that produce 18w and have 30,5 cmx185,8 cm.



POWERFILM R15-1200 18W ROLLUP SOLAR PANEL


A similar one with 50cmx 250cm would produce about 40w. If we use two they would produce about 80w and that starts to be very interesting.

They can be mounted on the life lines, to get the sun on the side and it seems to be easy to found a way of adjusting the angle there or over the side walk when the sun is more vertical. While on anchor they can be mounted on both sides of the boom and in many other places.

I would like to hear if someone has been experiencing with it, I mean roll up solar panels and how the electrical connections deal with salt water. That seems to be a major problem to me.

Of course I could dream higher and imagine a genoa that include that kind of stuff ( some films are really very thin and flexible). That would make for a huge saving in power and a very expensive genoa, but in the meantime I think that the other more useful way to get solar energy is on the boat shades.

I would also be interested to know if someone is using foldable panels, the ones that are normally know as military type sun shades, or any kind of foldable panel over and existing sun shade.



Tactical Solar Tents - 750 Watt ETI Part# ETI0021-0053

These type of panels can give you a lot more power. I guess that over a normal sized shade on a 40ft boat they can give you over 100w.

Any thoughts about this would be appreciated and any personal experienced more than welcomed.

...
I recently bought 2 100 watt roll up flexible solar panels and the main problem I have had with them is that on a sailboat if they are not mounted flat to a surface (floor, walkway, deck, cabin top) that they become their own "sail" picking up wind resistance along the length. My units are 19" wide and about 10' (feet) long and while they did keep my bilge pump batteries charged were not worth the added work and eventual damage from high winds getting under them and lifting them off of their hardware. The only way I would do it again would be by gluing them down to the surface so that there was no movement or possible damage from windage at a a mooring or dock. I mounted them to flexible plastic panels that were screwed to the deck and eventually found them ripped from their placement by high wind gusts. And, while I did buy 100w units I never really got more than .3 amps running through them at mid day with the sun at the highest point. I would recommend installing them if you can permanently (or at least install with no gaps underneath) affix them to a flat area away from the windier side of the boat. I bought them on ebay for about $90 USD each.

Rob
02-13-2014 06:38 PM
HMoll
Re: Roll-up solar panels

My house loads were huge, for a 35-footer, especially since I ran my air conditioning with a running alternator (instead of a genset). I decided to install one Ganz e-Solar, 55W on my bimini, but the panel was dedicated to my starting battery. Worked great, and sometimes at anchor just switched to that battery to run small loads on a sunny day (music, refrigerator).

Living in Puerto Rico, winds are easterly and sun travels on the south most of the year, so panel ended up on starboard side of bimini, for maximum exposure.

I think most people don't have an understanding of solar energy and how it works. I see manufacturers offering optional solar panels in front of companionway, under boom, sometimes having lines running on top! (Jeanneau, for example). I've seen plenty of solar panel installations with a nice windmill shading them! Back to Paulo's initial question, I was convinced with the semi-flexible panels installed on the bimini. I got some nice mounting hardware from Gemini Products, and I had the lightest installation possible. I also like the small rigid installations on a moveable pod/post, like they do in the minis, if you don't mind re-aligning it every few hours to get the best angle. Just remember that the shade of just a backstay, for example, can kill anywhere from 50% to 90% of the best possible power produced at that moment.

Oh, and go for it! Technology is ALWAYS depreciating and changes at a faster rate every day.

Regards,

Hans
02-13-2014 07:38 AM
Irunbird
Re: Roll-up solar panels

Quote:
Originally Posted by alctel View Post
I am looking at adding solar, however I am reluctant to do so right now since the tech seems to be in a state of rapid flux - 6 months from now prices could be a lot less for a lot more efficient panel
Yep, in fact, I'm re-thinking the whole idea (like I did just a few years ago..). I can buy just one more battery (230ah 6v golf cart battery) for $100 and have several days more juice to finish the race. Available sunshine is a big variable, so this may just end up as money down the drain..
02-13-2014 03:55 AM
alctel
Re: Roll-up solar panels

I am looking at adding solar, however I am reluctant to do so right now since the tech seems to be in a state of rapid flux - 6 months from now prices could be a lot less for a lot more efficient panel
02-12-2014 10:42 PM
Brent Swain
Re: Roll-up solar panels

Flexible panels have a habit of breaking down in UV, in which case their output drops drastically after a few years in the sun.
02-12-2014 07:55 PM
Minnesail
Re: Roll-up solar panels

Quote:
Originally Posted by ccriders View Post
I read an article last week that showed how the cost of solar panels is going the way of computer ram of a few years ago and speculates that in 5-10 (?) years solar power will be less expensive than coal. I guess the big issue for sailboats is surface area vs esthetics in getting enough power to run all of our modern conveniences. It would be nice if solar could power an air conditioner. Then we would have something going! Maybe using a bunch of Peltier modules would do it. What do you think?
John
If they get cheap enough and flexible enough, maybe they could make sails out of giant solar panels. Then you'd have enough surface area!
02-12-2014 07:23 PM
ccriders
Re: Roll-up solar panels

I read an article last week that showed how the cost of solar panels is going the way of computer ram of a few years ago and speculates that in 5-10 (?) years solar power will be less expensive than coal. I guess the big issue for sailboats is surface area vs esthetics in getting enough power to run all of our modern conveniences. It would be nice if solar could power an air conditioner. Then we would have something going! Maybe using a bunch of Peltier modules would do it. What do you think?
John
02-12-2014 01:47 PM
Irunbird
Re: Roll-up solar panels

Maine- is that for the brand name Solbians? I'm sure there will be quality issues for anything coming out of China, but I'd certainly be willing to pay for a quality product. Like the auto-pilot, this is an area I don't want to skimp.

edit: just figured out what you meant (couldn't see the photos at work)- wow, what a difference!
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome