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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Apps & Authors > Recommended Reading
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-07-2014 12:35 PM
WGEwald
Re: Recommended Reading

Quote:
Originally Posted by Group9 View Post
Sounds like your mother had some interesting times.
She was no Beverly Aadland. She didn't like Sinatra either. Her ideal man was a guy like Joel McRae.
11-07-2014 12:29 PM
Group9
Re: Recommended Reading

Quote:
Originally Posted by WGEwald View Post
My mother was a Girl Scout Mariner and her ship went with Irving Johnson for a week's cruise on the schooner Yankee. Sterling was the first mate. She thought he spent too much time admiring himself in the mirror :-D She would have been about 14 and he 19.
Sounds like your mother had some interesting times.
11-07-2014 11:48 AM
WGEwald
Re: Recommended Reading

Quote:
Originally Posted by Group9 View Post
The book got me interested in Hayden.. He is modest to the point of having almost no self esteem at some points.
My mother was a Girl Scout Mariner and her ship went with Irving Johnson for a week's cruise on the schooner Yankee. Sterling was the first mate. She thought he spent too much time admiring himself in the mirror :-D She would have been about 14 and he 19.
11-07-2014 10:48 AM
Group9
Re: Recommended Reading

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstern View Post
Agree with you completely on Sterling's book. He was a far more interesting guy than I knew. He said somewhere in there that he was born 100 years too late.

One thing I found fascinating was the dichotomy between his "poor but happy voyager" philosophy and his actions in Hollywood where he continually did things he supposedly despised for the money.
The book got me interested in Hayden and I've been looking for more interviews and articles about him. In one of them, an interviewer actually made that point and asked him, "If you hated Hollywood so much, why did you keep going back?" Hayden answered, "Because, they paid me stupid money, and although I hate Hollywood, I really love money."

But, you're right. Lot of contradictions in him, which he seems to have struggled with himself. He is modest to the point of having almost no self esteem at some points. In the book, he seems to suggest he only joined the OSS in WW2 (actually right before WW2) to get out of combat, when in reality, the OSS, the forerunner of the CIA and U.S. Special Forces, had some of the highest casulty rates of any service in WW2. And, then he writes, "They gave me the Silver Star for something, but, damned if I know what for".

Interesting man, but definitely flawed in a lot of ways. But, he sure brings out the romantic in me when I read about him.
11-07-2014 10:31 AM
mstern
Re: Recommended Reading

Agree with you completely on Sterling's book. He was a far more interesting guy than I knew. He said somewhere in there that he was born 100 years too late.

One thing I found fascinating was the dichotomy between his "poor but happy voyager" philosophy and his actions in Hollywood where he continually did things he supposedly despised for the money.
11-07-2014 10:20 AM
Group9
Re: Recommended Reading

I just ordered and am almost finished with "Wanderer" by Sterling Hayden.

I never knew much about Hayden before, other than he was kind of one time movie star. But, what an interesting life, almost all of it revolving around boats and sailing. And, he has got some pretty interesting life philosophies that he has not only preached, but practiced.

Best quote from the book.

“To be truly challenging, a voyage, like a life, must rest on a firm foundation of financial unrest. Otherwise, you are doomed to a routine traverse, the kind known to yachtsmen who play with their boats at sea... "cruising" it is called. Voyaging belongs to seamen, and to the wanderers of the world who cannot, or will not, fit in. If you are contemplating a voyage and you have the means, abandon the venture until your fortunes change. Only then will you know what the sea is all about.

"I've always wanted to sail to the south seas, but I can't afford it." What these men can't afford is not to go. They are enmeshed in the cancerous discipline of "security." And in the worship of security we fling our lives beneath the wheels of routine - and before we know it our lives are gone.

What does a man need - really need? A few pounds of food each day, heat and shelter, six feet to lie down in - and some form of working activity that will yield a sense of accomplishment. That's all - in the material sense, and we know it. But we are brainwashed by our economic system until we end up in a tomb beneath a pyramid of time payments, mortgages, preposterous gadgetry, playthings that divert our attention for the sheer idiocy of the charade.

The years thunder by, The dreams of youth grow dim where they lie caked in dust on the shelves of patience. Before we know it, the tomb is sealed.

Where, then, lies the answer? In choice. Which shall it be: bankruptcy of purse or bankruptcy of life? ”
― Sterling Hayden, Wanderer
11-04-2014 04:27 PM
ccriders
Re: Recommended Reading

I've just finished reading "Sextant" by David Barrie, and found it most enjoyable. I've been a history student all my life and have spent a considerable amount of time this last year studying the Baroque period with emphasis on the development of the cello and its music. So, when I was given "Sextant" for my birthday I was intrigued. The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were an amazing period both in music and in sailing.
Barrie tells the story of the development of the sextant and its use by the intrepid seamen that charted the world's oceans. He opens each chapter with his log notes written during his first trans Atlantic crossing in a 35 foot sailboat on which he learned how to use the sextant. I find it very difficult put myself into the period as so much of what we have today did not exist then, but Barrie very deftly takes you back to those olden times when hardy men spent their lives bouncing off distant shores to chart the oceans.
A good read.
John
11-01-2014 10:29 AM
ImASonOfaSailor
Re: Recommended Reading

CATAMARAN SAILING From Start to Finish by Phil Berman (1999)

Catamarans Every Sailor's Guide
10-30-2014 06:49 PM
titustiger27
Re: Recommended Reading

Quote:
Originally Posted by rikhall View Post
Funny Titus - I had fun with Bob's book - ya just have to read it with your tongue in your cheek.

Rik
I understand the tongue in cheek --- but for my literature... I expect something more creative than his 'than jokes'

funnier than a banana slipping on a tomato skin
10-30-2014 12:57 PM
rikhall
Re: Recommended Reading

Can't remember if I answered this or not????

Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Manual: Nigel Calder
Guide to Upgrading Your Cruising Sailboat: Dan Spurr
and
This Old Boat: Don Casey

In alphabetical order - I cannot rank them - they are all great!

Rik
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