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  Topic Review (Newest First)
6 Days Ago 06:37 PM
Adele-H
Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

Ok, for about $5 bucks, IDK, I had this Reflectix stuff left over from a job...
I made liners last year for the ice box. We use to have a block and a bag of ice last a maximum of two days before this system, had the ice last well into 5 days last year. Also, instead of the block of ice, we freeze gallon jugs of water, when it melts, we have drinking water instead of bilge water.
I cut a piece that goes down each side and does the bottom, punched a hole where the drain hole is at the bottom of the ice box. Made two more panels for front and back. and one more that fits over the top, a little longer than required so that it can be tucked in at the back of the box.
As the food goes away, we push the top piece down so that it is on top of the food.When you open the lid of the ice box, you can reach stuf that's in the back or in the front, but it keeps the cold in..
Nice if you don't have refrigeration.
Easy to clean, easy to store and cheap to make A roll of 24 inch Reflectix at home dump is about $25.
6 Days Ago 04:08 PM
Barquito
Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

Cool. Do I see a little negative roach on one side? That should decrease fluttering, I would think.
6 Days Ago 08:51 AM
svsolaris
Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

I wanted to try out a riding anchor sail. My boat swings like crazy when there's a breeze and I plan to get a mooring this year rather than slip. I found a few websites of people making riding sails out of regular hardware store tarp and then based the dimensions on the Sailrite kit. I'm a fan of trying to do things the unconventional way to see if it works. You learn a lot!

I have to thank Mom for this one though as she actually made it, I just pointed her in the right direction Seams are doubled up with zip zag stitching and reinforced with canvas. Seems solid to me and it cost $8 CDN (which is 5.72 USD, brutal) Just need to add a few carabiners.

We'll see how it works in the spring. I think it will work, it's just how well and how long it'll hold up.
2 Weeks Ago 01:39 PM
travlineasy
Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

I like the motion sensor light as a theft deterrent. Place one or two in the cockpit, and if someone enters the lights kick on, hopefully, sending the thief scurrying away. Thieves really don't like being seen.

Thanks for posting,

Gary
2 Weeks Ago 12:09 PM
miatapaul
Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

Quote:
Originally Posted by thereefgeek View Post
Found these for $14/each at Lowe's the other day, great for inside lockers and what not. Battery powered motion sensing LED lights made by Sylvania. Powered by 3 AAA batteries (we use the rechargeables from Costco), it has ON, OFF, 10 Second, and 60 Second delay modes. The motion sensor has a 120 degree detection beam and is extremely sensitive. The light lens also rotates back and forth to direct the beam where you want it. Best part is that they turn off automatically when you’re done inside (or stop moving for a few seconds).

They come with a removable magnet that mounts to your chosen surface with double stick tape, and they’ve also included a screw which fixes the magnet with a bit more security. The light fixture then “sticks” to the mounted magnet, but I tend to be a bit skeptical of it’s strength in rough seas. If one were inclined, one could add double stick tape between the magnet and the light fixture for a more secure mount.
I like the idea, but can you aim the sensors enough so it does not turn on every time the boat rocks and the clothes move? Of course if the door is shut I guess you would not know! And with rechargeables it really does not matter. On another topic, that is why shelves are better for clothes they don't chafe as much as they do swinging around in the hanging locker. I have an old cheap rain gear jacket that came with the boat that whole sections of the outside is rubbed off where it swung around rubbing on the jacket next to it, not sure how long it took though. But I woudl hate to try to put on my suit (I still have to work while living aboard) and find it had chafed in patches.
3 Weeks Ago 11:44 AM
albrazzi
Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

I finally got the picture thing figured out so I will be sharing some projects.

Most are from scraps so while not "Free" no direct cost immediately. I have so much small stock laying around from big provects what might qualify as Low Bucks for me might not truly qualify for others but here goes.

Main cabin sole refinish, mostly elbow grease. Stripper applied twice and wire brushed (fine SS or Brass) small like a big tooth brush, to remove from the grain and poly finished 6 coats looks GREAT.. Removed some rotted sections and made a grate for the affected areas. I like it because I can visually monitor the slack bilge for water constantly.
3 Weeks Ago 10:41 AM
thereefgeek
Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

Found these for $14/each at Lowe's the other day, great for inside lockers and what not. Battery powered motion sensing LED lights made by Sylvania. Powered by 3 AAA batteries (we use the rechargeables from Costco), it has ON, OFF, 10 Second, and 60 Second delay modes. The motion sensor has a 120 degree detection beam and is extremely sensitive. The light lens also rotates back and forth to direct the beam where you want it. Best part is that they turn off automatically when you’re done inside (or stop moving for a few seconds).

They come with a removable magnet that mounts to your chosen surface with double stick tape, and they’ve also included a screw which fixes the magnet with a bit more security. The light fixture then “sticks” to the mounted magnet, but I tend to be a bit skeptical of it’s strength in rough seas. If one were inclined, one could add double stick tape between the magnet and the light fixture for a more secure mount.
12-29-2015 03:25 PM
Tomas Kruska
Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

Looks like many of you are making the fender covers.

I've found pretty smart idea in one of the older Practial Boat Owner magazine, where someone suggested making fender covers from leggings. You know that kind of garments that only slim girls can wear :-)
12-29-2015 02:39 PM
Barquito
Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

I made cabin cushions from video instructions from Sailrite. They turned out pretty good. Not perfect. Made fender covers out of fleece with a drawstring without any instructions that turned out great. My daughter tells everyone that I sewed sweaters for the fenders.
12-28-2015 06:51 PM
Captainmeme
Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

Quote:
Originally Posted by socal c25 View Post
I have a Coronado 25 and I was thinking of the mainsail kit also, was it difficult at all?
We own a Nor'sea 27. I did the main and jib kit from Sailrite using a Sailrite machine. You will need room. Difficult? Not really, I compare sewing a Sailrite kit to painting a paint-by-number oil painting. The panels are marked with hem lines and line up arrows. Panels are held together using double sided sticky tape. Instructions are detailed and the support from Sailrite is top notched.
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