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Go Back   SailNet Community > Boat Builders Row > Pacific Seacraft > Nautical term
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-19-2012 10:06 AM
SVArgo
Re: Nautical term

This does vary somewhat between yachting, commercial, and naval marine practice, but that said:

Chock - The "hole" that mooring lines pass through. They can be mounted on the deck/rail, or integral into the bulwark/rail. If they are closed, they are called, well, closed chocks. If you can drop the line down into them, they are open chocks. On larger vessels, if there is a chock at the bow on centerline, it's usually called the "bullnose." Double chocks are oversized for passing multiple lines, particularly for Panama Canal, but that term is really for larger commercial vessels, not yachts.

Hawsepipe - It's what the anchor shank and chain/rode ride in from the windlass. Motor yachts often have an "anchor pocket" for the anchor to ship up tight against, sometimes called the "anchor bolster." Where the chain penetrates the deck after being stripped off the wildcat is the "chain bolster" or "chain pipe," which may be fitted with a "bellmouth" to keep it from fouling.

Then there's all the buttons, bitts, double bitts, timberheads, cleats, open cleats, kevels, and more, but that's another story.
09-17-2012 08:03 PM
dacap06
Re: Nautical term

Yes, it is a chock.

A hawsepipe carries the hawser, a chain or cable used for anchoring or towing.
09-17-2012 10:47 AM
SecondWindNC
Re: Nautical term

After looking at these terms a little more, I believe I was incorrect. Hawsepipe is the opening into the anchor locker, as you said. Chock would accurately describe the "guide" piece for the mooring lines, whether it's a hole through the gunwale or a fitting on top of the gunwale.
09-05-2012 05:46 AM
brokesailor
Re: Nautical term

I looked it up, looks like it should be a hawsehole. The Hawsepipe looks like it would be the opening that the anchor chain feeds into the anchor locker.
09-04-2012 11:57 PM
FSMike
Re: Nautical term

Had me scared for a minute, thought I was going to find out after all these years it was spelled hawes pipe. Fortunately, after reading your link, was reassured it is hawse pipe.
09-04-2012 11:50 PM
Tempest
Re: Nautical term

Quote:
Originally Posted by SecondWindNC View Post
Hawsepipe.

A bow chock serves essentially the same purpose but is usually open at the top and mounted on top of the caprail or gunwale rather than passing through the gunwale like the one pictured in the original post.

A chock would be more along these lines:

ok...I thought a Hawes Pipe was typically the opening that the anchor rode passed through.

Hawes Pipe

But I do see, the distinction that you are pointing out.
09-04-2012 08:38 PM
brokesailor
Nautical term

Tempest: Skalliwag is at Zahnisers. Yes a lot of boats stay at the slip year round but I always put her to bed on the hard.
09-04-2012 11:04 AM
SecondWindNC
Re: Nautical term

Hawsepipe.

A bow chock serves essentially the same purpose but is usually open at the top and mounted on top of the caprail or gunwale rather than passing through the gunwale like the one pictured in the original post.

A chock would be more along these lines:
09-04-2012 08:22 AM
Tempest
Re: Nautical term

Broke, I call them Bow Chocks.

Now, I have a question for you. Where do you keep your boat in the Solomons? I ask, because my brother has just been stationed there..and I'm considering moving my boat there for a season. Any suggestions, recommendations? Do folks leave their boats in all winter there?
09-04-2012 05:30 AM
brokesailor
Nautical term

What is the opening on the bow that you feed your bowlines called?

 
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