SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > MOB systems
 Not a Member? 


Thread: MOB systems Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
11-02-2012 10:06 PM
i_amcdn
Re: MOB systems

It is similar to the quick stop but the MOB I was taught in my Intermediate Cruising course was to immediately heave to. Once hove to release the wheel / tiller in short bursts to make a circle, coming up below the MOB.

I did this in the middle of Virgin Gorda Sound in a driving rain that hurt my face. It was much easier than putzing around with the figure 8 that we had been taught in the basic course.

I can attest to the effects of cold water. In late 80's I took my dinghy course (then called White Sail) on the Ottawa River in May. Part of the course was flipping our Albacores or Lasers and righting them. The week before that particular lesson one of my boat mates took out a laser while the other student and I rigged the Albacore. AS we launched from shore we watched the laser flip, get righted, flip again, right again and finally go down for a 3rd time. The team learning to man the rescue boat (this was a co-op type sailing club) could not get the engine started so we sailed over. The instructor asked the guy in the water if he needed help. "yyyyyyyesss" was the faint reply. The instructor told us that one of us had to jump in so I volunteered. I was wearing jeans, my white shirt from work, a fishermans knit sweater, a shell and my life jacket. As I hit the water my heart and breathing stopped for about 30 seconds it was so cold. I helped right the laser and then held on to one side while he crawled in the other. I swam back to the Albacore but I had no strength left in my arms. From the water the Albacore looks about 8 feet up. The instructor and the 3rd student grabbed my life jacket and hauled me up. I had been in the water a total of 10 minutes max and I was wiped out. We still had our lesson and then burgers and beer after. My nuts have only recently reappeared. I have supreme respect for cold water.
09-08-2012 09:19 PM
hellosailor
Re: MOB systems

"you need to have tried it out on that particular boat before you really need to use it."
Absolutely, Geoff!
With any MOB plan, you need to try it, and make sure the whole crew is familiar with it. And if anyone disagrees with it, work that through and see if they've found a flaw.

If you have a decksweeper the boom may not be high enough. And if you have a conventional boom, it still may not be high enough unless you drop the lifelines, or take the main halyard back to lift the aft end of the boom. Either way, we figured the multiple purchase of the 6:1 block would be a great advantage and the boom would be enough to get a MOB well out of the water, which is a good start.

Then again, we also have Standing Orders:

Rule #1, Stay on the Boat
Rule #2, Never walk on water in public, it tends to start religions
09-08-2012 07:16 PM
Geoff54
Re: MOB systems

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Then USE THE BOOM so you can lift them clear of the water AND CLEAER OF THE HULL and swing them inboard.

If you can't control the boom, leave it trimed in and secure as best you can, you'll still have the advantage of having a multiple part block and tackle to give you LIFT against the MOB's weight.
As I see it, using the boom presents two potential problems:

1. On many boats the boom is too low to lift someone high enough to clear to lifelines and swing them aboard.

2. To really take advantage of using the boom, you need to swing it out so that the MOB is kept clear of the hull but still control the swing. On most boats that requires running a line forward, like a preventer, so that the boom can be restrained between that and the main sheet. Could be quick and easy or slow and difficult depending on the boat, crew and level of preparedness. Just leaving it sheeted without a second line , pulls too horizontally so the MOB isnít clear of the hull. In those circumstances I think you would be better of using a halyard so that the lift is more vertical. You can use a winch to gain some mechanical advantage.

If you plan use the boom, you need to have tried it out on that particular boat before you really need to use it. It might be a great method for you and your boat but it might not.
09-08-2012 06:14 PM
hellosailor
Re: MOB systems

There are shackles and there are shackles. Like the carabiners used on rigging, versus the ones sold as keychains. Ornamental shackles have no place on rigging.
09-08-2012 06:01 PM
delite
Re: MOB systems

Great inexpensive way to go. I might worry about the snap shackle on the end attached to the lifting tackle on the backstay or a halyard though and would probably go with a bowline on that corner.
09-08-2012 05:58 PM
hellosailor
Re: MOB systems

delite, I don't understand your repeated reference to the boom as a danger. A boom is a boom, is a cargo boom, is a crane. That's how you reach out to lift things, and there's no reason it should endanger the crew or the MOB any more than a boom endangers everyone on deck at all times. Which it normally does, all of the time.

There are only three ways to approach a MOB in the water. You can try to back onto them, generally a bad idea since the prop is a pointy thing that likes to chew flesh, and you've got the prop and rudder and the stern is going to be bouncing up and down trying to kill the MOB unless you're in dead flat water.

If you've ever tried a stern boarding in the water, even in two foot seas, you won't want to be recovered that way.

So then you can approach the MOB from either upwind or downwind and try to recover them miships, which is how NOAA and others prefer to recover divers. Midships the hull is bouncing around less and the situation is more stable. Except, how do you approach the MOB? If you drift down on them, you may steamroll them with the hull. If you come up to them against the wind, as soon as you depower you'll fall off away from them.

Best bet? Come alongside them, either upwind or downwind as conditions merit, and get a line on them. Then USE THE BOOM so you can lift them clear of the water AND CLEAER OF THE HULL and swing them inboard.

If you can't control the boom, leave it trimed in and secure as best you can, you'll still have the advantage of having a multiple part block and tackle to give you LIFT against the MOB's weight.

We rigged a snatch block from a spare 6-part block and tackle, used a bit of light line to make sure it can't tangle while stored. MOB procedure is to clip it on the aft end of the boom and run the line out to the MOB however possible when it is time to recover them.

Using a multi-part block and tackle will make it possible to lift that big wet heavy MOB out of the water and clear of the hull before they get steamrolled by it. The boom? Is no more dangerous than it has been all day every day. Where else are you going to rig a pulley set that gives you lifting advantage and keeps the MOB clear of the hull?

Of course there are other ways to recover someone, and this is not to say a blanket roll in a sail isn't going to be better. That all depends on weather, spare hands, and everything else you need to judge on the spot.
09-08-2012 05:22 PM
paulk
Re: MOB systems

Quote:
Originally Posted by ccriders View Post
I too am concerned about boarding over the stern and opted for a side mount ladder. To my dismay, I discovered a couple of weeks ago that if there is any current at all the ladder will lift out of its brackets when the swimmer takes hold of it. We executed the quick stop after the swimmer jumped in. There was a tidal current running against us (probably a half knot) and the swimmer had to swim pretty aggressively to get to the Type IV and then when we pulled him to the ladder, one bracket released as soon as he grabbed it. We were in pretty smooth water, the wind was about 12kts and it was much more difficult that I would have expected. Keeping the ladder in the bracket is now a priority. Any suggestions?
We are planning to get a canvas or dacron triangle, about 10' on a side, with grommets & snapshackes on the corners. We'd attach two of the corners to our stanchion bases and drop the other end over the side the "victim" is on. Then the "victim is placed in the bunt of the triangle, and lifting tackle (attached to our running backstay) is secured to the third corner. Hoisting on the tackle holds the victim close to the boat, lifts him up, and essentially deposits him on deck, even if he's unconscious.
09-08-2012 12:47 PM
ccriders
Re: MOB systems

I too am concerned about boarding over the stern and opted for a side mount ladder. To my dismay, I discovered a couple of weeks ago that if there is any current at all the ladder will lift out of its brackets when the swimmer takes hold of it. We executed the quick stop after the swimmer jumped in. There was a tidal current running against us (probably a half knot) and the swimmer had to swim pretty aggressively to get to the Type IV and then when we pulled him to the ladder, one bracket released as soon as he grabbed it. We were in pretty smooth water, the wind was about 12kts and it was much more difficult that I would have expected. Keeping the ladder in the bracket is now a priority. Any suggestions?
09-07-2012 11:31 PM
delite
Re: MOB systems

45 seconds is very impressive. Clearly this is a drill that we all should be practicing and hoping we never need to use. I'm leaning towards rigging something to a halyard. That seems less likely to cause anyone injury than the boom.
09-07-2012 11:16 PM
paulk
Re: MOB systems

We periodically hold MOB drills as part of a race during the summer. Each boat is issued a watermelon. The Race Committee radios for them to be put over the side sometime during the race, and you have to pick it up again (no harnesses or boathooks!) before completing the race. Each boat needs a setup that works for them. We've found the quickstop maneuver to work well. Even under spinnaker in 15 knots of breeze, we've been able to be back at the "victim" within 45 seconds. Our boat has running backstays with 4:1 tackle that we can then attach to a harness or line(s) tied under the MOB to get them aboard over the lee rail.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:52 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.