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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Jib & Genoa Roller Furling
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Thread: Jib & Genoa Roller Furling Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-15-2012 11:10 AM
zz4gta
Re: Jib & Genoa Roller Furling

A 135 that is cut prett flat can be a good choice. If you don't want that, then talk to a sailmaker about a small 100 or 90% on a little furler with a wire/dyneema luff line. Quick to deploy, but you're still leaving the cockpit, pulling the sail out, hoisting, running sheets, unfurling, running back to the cockpit and trimming.
11-14-2012 04:11 PM
SchockT
Re: Jib & Genoa Roller Furling

I find the easiest solution is to choose my headsail before going out. I typically use a#2 (around 135) when taking the family out. If I expect higher winds I might rig the #3 instead. I have never found the need or desire to roller reef my headsail, or reef the main for that matter.
11-13-2012 10:45 PM
Sabreman
Re: Jib & Genoa Roller Furling

Quote:
Problem with this idea is that you can't actually lower the original sail and it's swivel if the smaller sail is already in the second groove..
Yeah. You're right. I was typing too fast. I want to do that and every time that I think of it, I'm stopped by this annoying fact.

Oh well, it's the Internet, waddya want fer free??
11-13-2012 05:25 PM
Faster
Re: Jib & Genoa Roller Furling

A good dual slot foil is absolutely the 'fastest' way to change a headsail.. you are never without a headsail during a change, and if you contrive to tack mid change you lose very little speed and you're not fighting/working the outside groove at any time.

However a furler will not allow this unless you disable the furling and leave the swivel down low, as previously mentioned...
11-13-2012 05:25 PM
jackdale
Re: Jib & Genoa Roller Furling

If you use an inner forestay for a smaller jib, you may have to set up running backstays.
11-13-2012 05:06 PM
patrscoe
Re: Jib & Genoa Roller Furling

You are correct, the furling does have two slots. I am pushing it if I leave my full 150% out in 14 kts and to slide in a 100% at that point would be very difficult.
Perhaps changing out 150% to a new little heavier 135% genoa. Also the 135 may be able to roll in easier with a better shape to it.
11-13-2012 03:00 PM
Faster
Re: Jib & Genoa Roller Furling

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabreman View Post
If you have roller furling, chances are that you have a 2nd slot in the headstay. You can hoist a 2nd jib in that slot and drop the #1. This is how a racing headsails are changed. But this begs the question that risk is induced by requiring someone to go forward to hoist/secure the sails. With a full crew it isn't an issue. With kids and short handed, it's a problem.....

.
Problem with this idea is that you can't actually lower the original sail and it's swivel if the smaller sail is already in the second groove..

Many furlers are equipped and designed to be able to remove the drum and use the foil as a racing foil, but the swivel is left low below the luff gate to facilitate sail changes as described.

Changing to the proper sail before you leave the dock, esp if we're talking mainly daysailing is the way to go...

If you did try to use a wire luff jib I'd use a deck-based tack fitting rather than the furling drum's. But I think the small sail working in the disturbed air of the rolled up genny would be less than ideal....
11-13-2012 02:00 PM
MarkSF
Re: Jib & Genoa Roller Furling

A few random thoughts in no particular order :

I find the worst case for the genoa's shape is furled slightly. I find it is best to either not furl it, or furl it a lot - say down to 50%. This results in less belly for high winds. Intermediate settings result in a big belly.

If you regularly encounter winds that need a smaller jib, it's best just to switch to one. My boat sails very well in lighter winds with a 100% - and it's good up to 25 kts. You don't gain as much going from 100 to 150% as you might think. The main benefit is downwind in light winds.

So for SF Bay I consider the best setup to be a 100% jib, main with at least 2 reefs, and a gennaker for downwind runs when the wind is light.

In summer when it's really blowing, the 100% comes down and the 83% goes up. That sail is still great upwind, but is not so good off the wind. Then you really need the gennaker for the downwind sheltered bits.

Finally I consider the extra inner forestay with storm jib hanked on to be a great solution. You see it a lot around here on the heavier cruisers.
11-13-2012 12:58 PM
Sabreman
Re: Jib & Genoa Roller Furling

Quote:
I also read that you can incorporate a wire within the luff, haul up the jib with the wire attached via spare jib halyard, attached the jib tack to the genoa roller furling tack and provide tension. This seems like a easy good method.
If you have roller furling, chances are that you have a 2nd slot in the headstay. You can hoist a 2nd jib in that slot and drop the #1. This is how a racing headsails are changed. But this begs the question that risk is induced by requiring someone to go forward to hoist/secure the sails. With a full crew it isn't an issue. With kids and short handed, it's a problem.

If your roller furling headsail has a foam luff, the shape shouldn't be that bad - certainly with kids aboard, performance is of secondary concern anyway. I wouldn't worry about loads on a partially furled genoa. A good sail can handle the load. Foam lufs are easy to retrofit by a sailmaker.

I have a similar dilemma, my 135% genoa's wind range is up to about 15-18kts. After that, she becomes unruly and the boat exceeds 25 deg of heel. So we reef the main, but the genoa is still a problem in 20-25 kts. So I'm thinking about buying a #2 (100-110%).
11-13-2012 10:17 AM
patrscoe
Jib & Genoa Roller Furling

I am interested in creating a easy and quick method of rigging a 100% Jib without removing my 150% Genoa from my roller furling, on a sloop rig.

Wind picks up, you have your two small kids on board and you want to ease the weather helm. Reefing in the 150% Genoa to 100% is possible but poor sail shape plus you are running with a lighter sail fabric creating damage and un-nesseccary wear on the sail which you use most of the summer in light air.

I guess I could always remove the 150% prior to going out to sail but looking for a different option, if possible.

I read that providing a inner jibstay with a highfield lever requires some engineering and would also require additional support with the foredeck to allow the forces to be absorbed. Thoughts on this is it would be expensive, does not suite within the design of our sailboat and perhaps a overkill from what I am looking to achieve.

I also read that you can incorporate a wire within the luff, haul up the jib with the wire attached via spare jib halyard, attached the jib tack to the genoa roller furling tack and provide tension. This seems like a easy good method.

Any thoughts on this concept?

 
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