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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Best catamaran for circumnavigation
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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-05-2013 04:38 PM
Gaelen
Re: Best catamaran for circumnavigation

My wife and I found an '05 FP Bahia 46 and LOVE IT. We looked at lagoon, antares, leopard, jaguar, voyage, etc. and just couldn't get the comfort, speed, stability, ease of handling, bridge deck clearance . . . even on some larger models.

This is her first real foray into the cruising thing, and we are very satisfied. One note however, I was, for a time, skipper of a FP Eleuthera 60 so you could say our perspective is a bit skewed.

Bottom line, if you have any questions or even want to stop into Charleston, drop us a line :-)
--
Gaelen
11-24-2012 03:11 PM
Saucierlm
Re: Best catamaran for circumnavigation

Why don't you and your wife consider chartering a catamaran with an experienced crew for a time or two, choose the area you plan to sail alone, ask them specifically to let you handle the boat so you can feel what you're getting into, you can sail it, docking is the question, a lot comes at you fast, the wind isn't always your friend..
Take your dream and run with it.. Education is important in all endeavors..

Good Luck ..
08-02-2012 12:12 PM
james3
Re: Best catamaran for circumnavigation

I am almost in the same situation of FreeSail, I live in Europe and I was thinking to buy an used Lagoon 440 that seems a good deal to me, but in this thread nobody talks about Lagoon catamarans for circumnavigate
06-27-2012 10:19 AM
oneshotonekill
Re: Best catamaran for circumnavigation

I realize this is an old thread, but it seems to have some sound advice for those of us with BIG dreams and financial matters in order. It seems that the biggest safety issue with cats is regarding capsizing due to too much sail area in heavy wind. Would the moral of the last statement be don’t get in a hurry; keep your sails in a bit and speed less than max for a margin of safety? All comments welcome!
04-19-2012 03:22 AM
Xx Darkwing xX
Re: Best catamaran for circumnavigation

While I see this is an older thread I have gleaned some great info. Thanks to pontiakos, wide openDDS and sailingdog, in particular, for the list of books which I will look in to. I am moving to Pensacola area soon and, while I have a lot of water and boat exp, I have only limited sailing and sailboat ownership under my belt. My wife and I took ASA 101 and I truly want a multihull (space, safety, comfort). Top dream boats seem to be the Antares line but I think finances will prevent that. I am seriously considering a monohull approx 30-40 feet to learn on for about 2-3 years. Does this seem like long enough to get proficient before moving to multi? I will also take the other ASA courses. I know all boats aren't bluewater but assume with proper provisioning they can be. I have much to learn and am thankfull to anyone who shares their knowledge herein. The goal is to spend serious time aboard once proficiency is gained in 3-5 years.
04-17-2012 07:33 PM
endoit
Re: Best catamaran for circumnavigation

Fantastic dream but take some time in preparing. For your plans ASA 101-105, charter 2-3 boats for 1-2 weeks at a time in nice and not so nice weather. I too always dreamed of sailing, emigrated with 1 suitcase, put myself through college and dental school and in my fifties stopped getting sea sick. Now sailing Chesapeake on a Bristol 35.5.
04-17-2012 08:10 AM
kuching
Re: Best catamaran for circumnavigation

Look seriously at the Freydis. It's designed by Eric LeRouge as a blue water performance cruiser. It's comfortable and fast and easy to sail by a couple and at a push can be singlehanded. I've been sailing one that I bought used for about $310,000. It's 11 years old now (I've owned it for almost 7 years) and there have been no problems. I've cruised from Australia to India and now have it in Malaysia. I wouldn't trade it for a heavier Privilege or more expensive Gunboat. They do make them new but there are a couple or used ones around ( search for Snow Leopard) . Good luck! And don't listen to those who might discourage you because you don't know how to sail. I've met lots of cruising people who bought their boat and the learned to sail including circumnavigators. Not a problem!
03-03-2012 10:28 AM
TQA Three year old thread mate - reply unlikely!
03-03-2012 10:13 AM
WideOpenDDS
Pair a Docs

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeSail View Post
My wife and I are both dentists. We have been working for the last 12 years...
Very cool. I'm a DDS n a different boat. My wife divorced me when I told her I wanted to sell the to practices and circumnavigate. I've been looking at Catamans for about two years now (I owned a 1935 36' wooden monohull liveaboard in Daytona for 5 years at the turn of the century). I like the Cats because 1) they don't heel, spilling your beer under sail, they are more roomy and the living room, bar and back porch are all on the same floor and 2) Chicks dig #1. Well at least non-sailing, or newbie Skipperettes do. I also like no having to pay Seatow when a sand bar shifts after a blow preventing one from making it to ones fav drinking establishment until the tide comes in.

Anyway.. The Cats I like for single handing are in the 36'-42" range, and the ones I keep coming back to are the Manta 42' or 45' with its self tacking jib and the davit mounted sling seat and the large double helm seat when you are sailing with your baby. I like the S.African boats (Jaguar 36, Leopards 38'-'45) because there are alot of them out there in bareboat fleets and you can get a bargain used one if you look enough for one that's not been abused. You are looking at $350 +/- $100 for new or used. or even under $200. The Mantas even come with a Wash/Dryer, so lots of bails and whistles, well made, great layout, and that self tacking Jib makes it easy. for someone learning or short hand situ's
Recently I found a nice Prout that I probably would buy today. Fits my bill @ 39', $180K, Super large U shaped seating in the salon, that three (or more) could lay one (also makes a bed when the table is down), which is a consideration, as some rounded couches won't let you lay strait. the prout also has a smaller main sail and is stepped more aft, and can run with a staysail and a head sail.. giving you lots of canvas size options and helps newer sailors from getting overpowered if caught with huge main full in a micro squall or blast... which happens. One other note.. there has never been a reported incident of a Prout capsizing. 39' multi = 50' mono when considering stowage and roominess.

And finally A Monohull that I Like is the new Beneteau Sense 50' At ~E250.00 New (1st year new). It is wide (15.8' wide), has lots of room, can order the cabin in a 3.5 bed or 2.5 bed and large "office" version, and the Transom folds down like a station wagon tailgate , so you can tangle your tootsies of the back porch. PLUS, and this is the kicker.. it has a bow thruster that is set up with a joystick that makes docking in any weather an easy one man job. Personally I would do a 50' mono if I knew I could dock it myself routinely, and not have to count on yelling instructions to a new girlfriend and having her complain that I'm always yelling at her. I would much rather "park" with cocktail in hand and my honey in good spirits.

Thats my two cents worth, more like a $1.95 Write me. I'd like to see where you are in your journey. I'm hoping to relocate to Malta and sail the Med pulling teeth for diesel and Ice cube money. WideOpenDDS@Yahoo.com
06-29-2009 06:45 AM
sailingdog If you're serious about multihulls, I'd highly recommend you pickup Chris White's The Cruising Multihull and Mike McMullen's Multihull Seamanship.

As for learning to sail... My recommendation to you is to spend your first year coastal cruising and doing progressively longer sails and working your way up to short blue water passages and then longer and longer passages.

I'd also recommend that you take at least a basic ASA 101 learn to sail course, which will give you a solid foundation to base your learning on. Better yet, take the whole sequence, including the 101, 103, 104, 105 and 106 courses, which would give you the basic fundamentals of cruising on a sailboat... along with the navigation skills you'll need.

If you want to learn how to do this yourself, the basic 101 course is a minimum IMHO, and will get you off to a fairly decent start.

I'd recommend you pick up the following books:

Dave Seidman's The Complete Sailor
Richard K. Hubbard's Boater's Bowditch
Beth Leonard's The Voyager's Handbook
Richard Henderson's Singlehanded Sailing
Don Casey's This Old Boat and Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual
The Annapolis Book of Seamanship or Chapman's.

This basic library will give you a basic sailing primer, a basic book on navigation techniques, a book on cruising, a book on sailing long distances singlehanded, two books on sailboat maintenance and upkeep, and a book on the rules and traditions of seamanship.
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