SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > How to size rope
 Not a Member? 


Thread: How to size rope Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
12-12-2006 01:16 AM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigslo
I was on aa Endeavour 42 about 20 years ago sitting in the wrong place when a jib sheet was let fly. I thought I was hit in the head with a tire tool. That taught me to always be aware of what was going on around me on a boat and don't sit next to the sheet winch.
pigslo
Fortunately, Pigslo's skull was thick enough to protect him from serious harm...and apparently he learned something.... the impact may have pushed the lesson in...
12-10-2006 03:17 PM
pigslo I was on aa Endeavour 42 about 20 years ago sitting in the wrong place when a jib sheet was let fly. I thought I was hit in the head with a tire tool. That taught me to always be aware of what was going on around me on a boat and don't sit next to the sheet winch.
pigslo
12-10-2006 04:58 AM
yotphix Can't speak for the mythbusters but when I worked in film special effects, I saw a small dia. (I think 1/8") 7x19 wire rope break during a tow in car crash scene. The wire shot out faster than the eye could see and neatly severed a 1 1/2" sapling and several smaller branches 15 yards from where it snapped before balling itself all up. Be careful with any tensioned material approaching it's yield strength.
12-10-2006 12:43 AM
pigslo I saw that episode of mythbusters. That pig was not harmed at all. He is a family member that is from the acting branch and was paid quite well for that show. He is such a ham though.
pigslo
12-09-2006 03:15 PM
khbritten Giu -

Have you seen the book, "A Cook's Tour", by Anthony Bourdain? It chronicles vividly the delicious demise of a Portuguese pig. A great read, but be ready to become hungry.

Ken
12-08-2006 07:42 PM
sailaway21 I think we have apples and oranges again here. By cable it appears you are referring to wire rope and it has a stretch factor of 1%. Nylon, on the other hand, has a stretch factor of 40% at breaking strain. 5/8" dia nylon has a breaking strain of approx. 9600 lbs while 5/8" dia wire rope, depending on construction, has a breaking strain of 30,000 lbs or greater. When wire rope parts it basically just falls in the water as it's only stretched 1%. I don't know if I'd trust my pig to almost 5 tons of snap from a nylon line.
Regardless, the lines mentioned earlier are 8-10" mooring lines (2-5/8" to 3-1/4" dia.) with breaking strains from 146,000 - 226,000 lbs. That's over 70 tons, long tons or short, flying back at you and if it hits a pig I think we'll have a new definition of rag-out of pork.
The vessel in question was the SS Thomas Nelson, a Mariner-class freighter, long consigned to razor blades. If, by chance, she's moth-balled somewhere the indentation is in the lazarette aft, starboard side.

The most common line parted is the spring line and it happens when coming alongside and checking the vessel. The old adage is, "strain it but don't part it" as a parted line has no stopping power. Even on a 20,000 lb boat, if you part a spring line, you are going to have 10 tons of force coming back at you. When ships were converting from manila to synthetic it was a common source of death or dismemberment. Seaman today are well educated on this and never stand in the lead of a line. BTW, the most common injury seemed to be amputation of the leg at about knee height.
12-08-2006 12:52 PM
Giulietta One good thing about pigs, too..

In case (and I am saying in case) we ever get occupied by the Islamic, pigs will be safe!!!!!
12-08-2006 12:14 PM
camaraderie Giu...that's the difference between the chicken and the pig in the traditional "bacon and eggs" breakfast here in the states. The chicken helps out but the pig has committment!
12-08-2006 12:09 PM
Giulietta Ahhhh

PIGSLO will be very very upset!!! Used one of his cousins, shame on them....
12-08-2006 12:03 PM
btrayfors Too bad they didn't use one of the "Myth Busters" TV show producers instead of the pig!

Bill
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:00 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.