SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > AIS alarm
 Not a Member? 


Thread: AIS alarm Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
01-08-2013 09:52 PM
bigdogandy
Re: AIS alarm

Ok - this a little off topic, but I understand you can send AIS data to an iPad and view it on a chart with iNavx.....can you do the same with radar images?
01-08-2013 08:33 PM
chef2sail
Re: AIS alarm

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
On my own boat, my AIS is a stand-alone setup and pretty basic, I'm not able to integrate it to my plotter anyway, due to the insufficient baud rate (or some such mumbo-jumbo) of my older Simrad 44...

I think that ability is overrated, anyway... If you can't form the picture in your mind of the info AIS is providing, well...

No doubt I feel differently than most about this, but I don't even like the practice of overlaying radar on a plotter. Primary reason being, I always want the plotter in North-up mode, and the radar in Heads-up... Again, anyone who can't process the difference between the two at a glance, perhaps should take up another hobby... IMHO, running a plotter in heads-up mode is strictly for Sea-Ray drivers... (grin)

I definitely think we've passed the threshold of "Too Much Information" being conveyed or displayed in a single display - I think it's far safer to keep them separate, in that it better encourages the practice of keeping your eyes outside of the boat. Having so much disparate information crammed into a single display results in having to stare at it far longer in the effort to sort it all out, I think distinct displays are easier to interpret at a glance...

Akin to a bank of analog gauges set so that their "Normal" readings all point straight up, compared to a bank of digital gauges, each of which requires "interpretation" of the reading, in order to determine whether everything is "Normal", or not...

I know, call me a dinosaur... Just don't get me started on the piss-poor practice of interfacing autopilots to waypoints... Again, that stuff is best left to the Sea-Ray jockeys... (grin)
I always likened you to a Triceratops
01-08-2013 07:40 PM
kellysails
Re: AIS alarm

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post

baud rate (or some such mumbo-jumbo)

call me a dinosaur... (grin)
OK, you're a dinosaur But probably, one heck of a great sailing dinosaur.
01-08-2013 07:30 PM
JonEisberg
Re: AIS alarm

Quote:
Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post

Having always had radar this year having AIS for the first time was a great addition. Right now I have it superimposed on the chartplotter, but can see where there will almost be too much data available. I was used to having on large screen with just the radar imposed over the chartplotter. With both it was too much in crowded areas and I found myself split screening to have the radar seperated.

Jon since you use both is that how you usually run it in crowded areas? Do you just run the AIS? Radar? at night or in fog? Crowded areas means also many different kinds of boats...pleasure as well as commercial.
On my own boat, my AIS is a stand-alone setup and pretty basic, I'm not able to integrate it to my plotter anyway, due to the insufficient baud rate (or some such mumbo-jumbo) of my older Simrad 44...

I think that ability is overrated, anyway... If you can't form the picture in your mind of the info AIS is providing, well...

No doubt I feel differently than most about this, but I don't even like the practice of overlaying radar on a plotter. Primary reason being, I always want the plotter in North-up mode, and the radar in Heads-up... Again, anyone who can't process the difference between the two at a glance, perhaps should take up another hobby... IMHO, running a plotter in heads-up mode is strictly for Sea-Ray drivers... (grin)

I definitely think we've passed the threshold of "Too Much Information" being conveyed or displayed in a single display - I think it's far safer to keep them separate, in that it better encourages the practice of keeping your eyes outside of the boat. Having so much disparate information crammed into a single display results in having to stare at it far longer in the effort to sort it all out, I think distinct displays are easier to interpret at a glance...

Akin to a bank of analog gauges set so that their "Normal" readings all point straight up, compared to a bank of digital gauges, each of which requires "interpretation" of the reading, in order to determine whether everything is "Normal", or not...

I know, call me a dinosaur... Just don't get me started on the piss-poor practice of interfacing autopilots to waypoints... Again, that stuff is best left to the Sea-Ray jockeys... (grin)
01-08-2013 06:48 PM
kellysails
Re: AIS alarm

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
I agree with Jon.

Furthermore, AIS on a chartplotter screen will get very busy to to point of obscuring the hazrads, nav aids etc.. In the future a separate display will be needed.
What I like on my AIS enabled chart plotter is the projected course track extensions from the AIS targets. I set mine for 60 minute projection. I am continually amazed how I am picking up course lines across my virtual bow from fast moving freighters that are not within visual range. "Crap, where did that come from". Very useful. Some of these freighters are flying through the Sound at 22+ knots, typically RoRo's. Then there is the SEA / VIC fast ferry, 30+ knots.

I stay out of the traffic lanes as much as possible, but in the Puget Sound it is inevitable that you will cross these lanes a couple of times in any day trip.

I usually ignore the vast majority of AIS targets but keep a close eye on the projected course tracks of fast movers. It is really helpful.
01-08-2013 05:11 PM
chef2sail
Re: AIS alarm

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
Perhaps I should have clarified, I meant I would have liked to have had AIS in addition to radar, which the boats I were running actually did have... I agree, if I could only have one or the other, I'd chose radar, no question...

However, I find that there is plenty of traffic transmitting AIS on the bay that do not confine themselves to designated "channels", tugs in particular... And, in certain parts of the bay, such as between Annapolis and Cove Point, the pilots of even the largest ships have a considerable amount of leeway as to where they will run, make course changes, and so on... Further south, depending upon their draft, some vessels will adhere to a channel like the Rappahanock Shoal Reach, others will not... And, when you approach Thimble Shoals/Hampton Roads, it's very common to see lighter tugs taking up all sorts of different courses, cutting across flats towards Cape Charles, and whatnot...

Tugs are the primary reason I'd like to have AIS on the bay, their running lights can often be difficult to discern, and their movements somewhat irregular...
Thats true I primarily am in the North and middle Bay. Yes some of the tugs, especially with flat barges dont always follow the channel exactley. I like my AIS and it is great for ID plus hailing the vessel too as opposed to radar.

Tugs with barges took me a while to learn the different radar signitures which the AIS would show. The AIS target for many of the tugs with barges only shows the tug. With radar you can see the digital radar object is way larger than just a tug and if the cable has some length to it like on the ocean/ larger, distance pulls/ pushes, you can see it defined as two objects. I found the radar especially helpful in NY harbor where there are a lot of tugs with long hawser cables connecting the two vessels. The are so many differing configurations with some tugs locked in bhind the barge, some bulling the varge from the sdie and attached to it, some pulling on a long line. etc.

I terms of line of sight at night it can be very difficult with good sea state to really identify what you are seeing in light patterns in a place like NY Bay and harbor with many different channels and types of ships, as well as land lights. Lights distance at night is much harder to differentiate. The different size ships in NY Bay can come up on you very quickly when they close into the 5 mile range and it can be difficult to even figure which channel they are ridiing in on or from seawar aimimng at( Sandy Hook vs Ambrose for instance)/
without hailing the vessel.

Having always had radar this year having AIS for the first time was a great addition. Right now I have it superimposed on the chartplotter, but can see where there will almost be too much data available. I was used to having on large screen with just the radar imposed over the chartplotter. With both it was too much in crowded areas and I found myself split screening to have the radar seperated.

Jon since you use both is that how you usually run it in crowded areas? Do you just run the AIS? Radar? at night or in fog? Crowded areas means also many different kinds of boats...pleasure as well as commercial.
01-08-2013 03:59 PM
JonEisberg
Re: AIS alarm

Quote:
Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post
Really John...the AIS on the Chessie. There are so few vessels which use it and almost all of them are in the major shipping channel which I usually avoid anyway as there is no reason to be in it except to cross. Even the Delaware River and Bay to Cape May I have found the radar to be more helpful than the AIS.
Perhaps I should have clarified, I meant I would have liked to have had AIS in addition to radar, which the boats I were running actually did have... I agree, if I could only have one or the other, I'd chose radar, no question...

However, I find that there is plenty of traffic transmitting AIS on the bay that do not confine themselves to designated "channels", tugs in particular... And, in certain parts of the bay, such as between Annapolis and Cove Point, the pilots of even the largest ships have a considerable amount of leeway as to where they will run, make course changes, and so on... Further south, depending upon their draft, some vessels will adhere to a channel like the Rappahanock Shoal Reach, others will not... And, when you approach Thimble Shoals/Hampton Roads, it's very common to see lighter tugs taking up all sorts of different courses, cutting across flats towards Cape Charles, and whatnot...

Tugs are the primary reason I'd like to have AIS on the bay, their running lights can often be difficult to discern, and their movements somewhat irregular...
01-08-2013 03:02 PM
ChristinaM
Re: AIS alarm

Quote:
Originally Posted by rockDAWG View Post
There "IS" no night viewing mode on my Macbook
I know this is a joke but you can flip the colors on a macbook. In Preferences under Accessibility, there's an "Invert Colors" option.

RedScreen seems like it'll actually switch to a red screen. I haven't tried it but it looks like you'd want to turn it on and use its built-in invert colors option.

If you just don't want it to totally blind you in the evening, I strongly recommend Flux. The color of the screen becomes warmer after sunset.
01-08-2013 02:07 PM
rockDAWG
Re: AIS alarm

I too want to apologize, Capt. There "IS" no night viewing mode on my Macbook, and I did not have a Gen III night vision. I was just being funny as my normal self. I am funny as hell, and have been entertained my classmates, teachers, family, colleagues, crews and captains.

Yes, I have been very lucky in sailing. The most serious was the total loss steering (cable broke) while tacking to avoid the barge over taking me on my port aft. At first I let go all sheets to slow the boat down, but not enough. I took in the jib sheet and filled the jib and had the wind turned boat to port and barely missed the barge. I have not had much fog in the Chesapeake bay, but New England was totally different story.

Every voyage is an adventure, so I just have to soak in and replay it in my head how I could do better next time. But I know my luck will eventually runs out. Therefore, I constantly think about the "what if" in my spare time and read on Sailnet to see if there is another approach.

I have an advantage over other is I don't panic even facing death. I don't scream or curse at the situation. I just calmly execute my Plan A, B, C and etc in a logical order.

May be I will start another thread to talk about the unpopular decision I had to make to turn around the boat back to Key West (Dry Tortugas) while we heading to the Cuba coast on Wednesday, Nov 26. It has been more than a month now; I am glad I made that decision. The owner of the boat is safe and happy.
01-08-2013 02:01 PM
chef2sail
Re: AIS alarm

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
My apologies, I missed the clue that you were just kidding... Didn't seem all that far-fetched to me, you were posting here the night you were running down outside the reef of the Keys, after all.. (grin)

You're a lucky sailor, it would appear, if you have never once felt the need for either radar, or AIS, on Chesapeake Bay... I would have really, REALLY liked to have had the latter on at least a couple of my trips down there last year...
Really John...the AIS on the Chessie. There are so few vessels which use it and almost all of them are in the major shipping channel which I usually avoid anyway as there is no reason to be in it except to cross. Even the Delaware River and Bay to Cape May I have found the radar to be more helpful than the AIS.

I am in no way discounting the AIS as I think its a marvelous tool , especially in the open ocean. I guess I agree with your wishing everyone had a transponder comment. It would be quite a light show here.

The comment obout radar useless on the Chesapeake would only be made by someone who isnt out at night or in the fog. It has been extremly usefull to have good digital radar at night or in the fog as it identifies even the small PB.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:07 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.