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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Minimum extended cruising requirements.
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Thread: Minimum extended cruising requirements. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-16-2013 10:07 AM
mdi
Re: Minimum extended cruising requirements.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt.aaron View Post
He was actually asking what is the smallest he could get away with. He his wife, occasionaly his 2 daughters. Maybe a 35 foot center cockpit something or other. That aft cabin gives the owners the privacy from the guests and vice versa.
The O'Day 37 Center is roomy based on comments above; but more than that I would be looking at waterline lengths v. Length overall. Older designs have long LOA but less LWL, generally speaking. So the older you go the more LOA you need to get the same LWL that is in a more recent design.
01-15-2013 09:13 PM
Capt.aaron
Re: Minimum extended cruising requirements.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bljones View Post
You're right, CA- Westsails are a good big water heavy weather boat. If one's intent is to work down the east coast and then the Bahamas and the caribbean, as the OP has stated, then there's lots of duck-out points, so I'd put less of a premium on weather ability and more on comfort and speed.
A slow cat is going to be at least 1.5 times as fast as a West Sail, and IMO is more welcoming to newbies- less heel, easier to work on deck, etc.

I am surprised at how civil this thread has remained.
Ya, I only get worked up about anchor's and chain.
I'm just going on the things he listed, and a good weather boat that was roomy for as much as 5, coupled with his admition of new to off shore called for a big cat. he said he was weary of multi's, so a big snail seamed to me the next best thing. I agree with the less heel, easier work on deck. They do tend do be lightly built. I could probably kick my way out through the bulkhead of my friends new french catamaran, and then there is CD's take on dockage. I was just sitting on the back of a tug boat in Miami harbour a few min. ago, watching cruising sail boats come and go, and ya know what, there all pretty dang good realy. I've alway's been able to get comfy on just about anything that floats. He was actually asking what is the smallest he could get away with. He his wife, occasionaly his 2 daughters. Maybe a 35 foot center cockpit something or other. That aft cabin gives the owners the privacy from the guests and vice versa.
01-15-2013 08:54 PM
bljones
Re: Minimum extended cruising requirements.

You're right, CA- Westsails are a good big water heavy weather boat. If one's intent is to work down the east coast and then the Bahamas and the caribbean, as the OP has stated, then there's lots of duck-out points, so I'd put less of a premium on weather ability and more on comfort and speed.
A slow cat is going to be at least 1.5 times as fast as a West Sail, and IMO is more welcoming to newbies- less heel, easier to work on deck, etc.

I am surprised at how civil this thread has remained.
01-15-2013 06:53 PM
Capt.aaron
Re: Minimum extended cruising requirements.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bljones View Post
Wetsnails have to handle weather well- they can't get out of the way of it.
They run in a big sea better than most sail boats off shore. Most sail boats don't beat the weather out there. The thing about them is, for a new to the big stuff cruiser, they are very forgiving in the messy stuff, when you run in a performance boat, you got to work to stay the course, a fin keel wants to turn into every swell, and you have to steer hard to either side with each chaser, a snail will just float you through it. The Westsnail is a great " bring the family to sea" boat, it gives you time to get used to how it is because it is already used to it. Just my opinion.
01-15-2013 05:45 PM
bljones
Re: Minimum extended cruising requirements.

Wetsnails have to handle weather well- they can't get out of the way of it.
01-15-2013 05:10 PM
Capt.aaron
Re: Minimum extended cruising requirements.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bljones View Post
A cat doesn't have to be expensive, as long as you're not all caught up in the latest boat show/ charter company's shiny wet dream.
A Catalac 9M or Gemini 3000 might be the ticket. Both can be found under $50K, both are easy to handle, and both pack more room and creature comforts than the average 36' monohull. You can't load them as heavily as a mono, but many folks have satisfactorily lived aboard and cruised the caribbean in both for years.

And it can be really nice to have guests at the opposite end of the boat, in the opposite hull.
Ya, that's all I'm say'n. But for big sea, no worries, tie her off and go below saftey, see you when it's over, make some tea and hold on while you read a book and ride it out, take all that she throw's at ya, a big west sail type fat but double ender high free board full keel to the rudder shoe boat is the ticket.
01-15-2013 04:52 PM
bljones
Re: Minimum extended cruising requirements.

A cat doesn't have to be expensive, as long as you're not all caught up in the latest boat show/ charter company's shiny wet dream.
A Catalac 9M or Gemini 3000 might be the ticket. Both can be found under $50K, both are easy to handle, and both pack more room and creature comforts than the average 36' monohull. You can't load them as heavily as a mono, but many folks have satisfactorily lived aboard and cruised the caribbean in both for years.

And it can be really nice to have guests at the opposite end of the boat, in the opposite hull.
01-15-2013 04:51 PM
Scott&Rosie
Re: Minimum extended cruising requirements.

I know O'Day had two versions of their 39 and one which was called the ODay /Hunter 40 which I belive had less than a 5'draft. If an older one could be found, I'm guessing that might fit the bill very well if I could get it right price wise. I'm told they were very stable boats with lots of sail. I know the smaller ones were.
01-15-2013 04:30 PM
Capt.aaron
Re: Minimum extended cruising requirements.

I deliverd a 27 foot Benny first to Columbia with two dudes, that makes 3, and we where o.k. A girl would'nt of liked it, nice galley.
01-15-2013 04:23 PM
Tallswede
Re: Minimum extended cruising requirements.

Just to run a little counter current from some of the other posters here. A good friend has a 32' Beneteau Oceanis. Now, I know this is not a very big boat but it does have a nice V-berth cabin as well as a roomy aft bunk (the cabin part is not so big though), as well as a roomy settee berth. So a couple with occasional kids and a friend for a short stay is doable. We have done a long weekend with 6 adults aboard with out a problem, allthough if you are someone who needs a lot of privacy, this won't work well. These boats are pretty affordable and sell well when it is time to move up. I would keep this in mind when choosing your boat.

Kevin
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