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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > cruising dinghy in currents and beach camping
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-03-2013 09:41 AM
norahs arc
Re: cruising dinghy in currents and beach camping

Go have fun! I did the same thing as a teenager in a 12 ft clinker built cat rigged boat. (On the other coast - Northumberland Strait.) I had tons of fun and learned the joy of just being on the water.
Just remember this old sailors saying - avoid the storm you can't weather and weather the storm you can't avoid. ie Keep a sharp eye on conditions and keep track of places to find refuge, and have fun. (Wish I was young enough to sail in company with you.)
03-01-2013 12:14 PM
davidryan8100
Re: cruising dinghy in currents and beach camping

Quote:
Originally Posted by Agri View Post
Don't listen to the naysayers on here. Last summer in Prince Rupert I met two gentleman who kayaked up the coast from Vancouver independantly of each other without any problems. One was from Scotland, had zero experience in a Kayak or on the water in general. He flew into Van bought a Canadian Tire kayak, filled it with food printed some maps from Google Maps and started paddling for the inside passage. He didn't even realize that currents exisisted until I asked him about them. He made it all the way to Alaska then back down to Rupert.

The other guy was from New Zealand, basically same story except he had considerable more marine experience from being on a Monster Energy drink sponsered SeaDoo demonstration team. He didn't take any maps, got lost once, but still made it safe and sound.

As far as currents go just hit up Capital Iron. They sell the current atlas as well as the schedules you need to make it usefully and no harder to understand then reading a tide chart.

DON'T where a drysuit. If you are rowing, paddling, doing any sort of physical activitey you are going to get very sweaty and uncomfortable. Both the before mentioned people wore wetsuits and found them adequate.

You could also try a sailing kayak. I can't find it now but I have read of people doing at least portions of the NWP in those. Heck the Inuit used seal skin kayaks with great success for years up there.
I'm totally agree with you.You'r 100% good here that if you are rowing, swimming, doing any kind of actual activitey you are going to get very wet and unpleasant. Both the before described people used wet suits and discovered them sufficient.
I agreed what's said above!!!
08-25-2012 11:53 PM
CrazyRu
Re: cruising dinghy in currents and beach camping

Quote:
Originally Posted by driggers View Post
Good points for sure, and hobie 16 is easy to find used for a good price, plus the payload is larger than it is for a comparable dinghy...

I'm still concerned about the fact that you can't row it, and can't motor it. Here is the scenario I am afraid of:

mistake....

Thanks again for your helpful comments!
There are several misconceptions here.
1. Catamarans are very easy to paddle with canoe paddles and two persons on board.
2. Catamarans are easy to row with one person. It will require some modifications for installing oarlocks
3. Catamarans can be equipped with a motor. I don't know why...

Hobie 16 isn't a good choice for beach cruising. Any other model and brand with more hull's volume will be better.
It is easy to prevent turtling with the mast float. (google hobie bob)
about any beach cats will require modifications, including figuring out how to reef and strike sails down

You will need skills, and equipment, including waterproof bags, and drysuits, which are expensive.

Another option is Hobie MIrage Tandem Island trimaran, or any boat out of Hobie Mirage line of sailing kayaks
http://www.hobiecat.com/sailboats/tandem-island/
08-25-2012 01:23 PM
Agri
Re: cruising dinghy in currents and beach camping

Don't listen to the naysayers on here. Last summer in Prince Rupert I met two gentleman who kayaked up the coast from Vancouver independantly of each other without any problems. One was from Scotland, had zero experience in a Kayak or on the water in general. He flew into Van bought a Canadian Tire kayak, filled it with food printed some maps from Google Maps and started paddling for the inside passage. He didn't even realize that currents exisisted until I asked him about them. He made it all the way to Alaska then back down to Rupert.

The other guy was from New Zealand, basically same story except he had considerable more marine experience from being on a Monster Energy drink sponsered SeaDoo demonstration team. He didn't take any maps, got lost once, but still made it safe and sound.

As far as currents go just hit up Capital Iron. They sell the current atlas as well as the schedules you need to make it usefully and no harder to understand then reading a tide chart.

DON'T where a drysuit. If you are rowing, paddling, doing any sort of physical activitey you are going to get very sweaty and uncomfortable. Both the before mentioned people wore wetsuits and found them adequate.

You could also try a sailing kayak. I can't find it now but I have read of people doing at least portions of the NWP in those. Heck the Inuit used seal skin kayaks with great success for years up there.
08-25-2012 12:32 PM
Bilgewater
Re: cruising dinghy in currents and beach camping

Quote:
Originally Posted by peterchech View Post
Sounds like ther really isn't much wind in this area
Peter...just to be clear.
There is wind and lots of it out here. Sailing is done year round but during the summer we can go for long periods during a day or even a couple of days with little or no wind. Sailing is very very popular around here but with the combination of traffic, big tides, lots of currents, going every which way and many islands, channels, inlets and mountains, blocking winds, funneling winds, funneling seas etc. etc. it can be problematic getting around without an efficient method of propulsion or an auxiliary method of propulsion. [edit] Kayaks are efficient and work well.
08-25-2012 12:00 PM
Bilgewater
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterchech View Post
Sounds like ther really isn't much wind in this area then, maybe something like a motor canoe with a 3.5 ob would suit the op better.

I enjoy kayaking, but when u actually have to get somewhere it is really hard work and a little boring too. So for me it's sailing or nothing. Too bad, kayaking is an infinitely more affordable hobby :-)
Adventure Kayaking is very common out here, and is a very good way of getting around. In popularity it ranks up there with sailing. No problem with currents and kayaks but you need to be able to understand the currents. Most people I know have kayaks including myself.
08-25-2012 11:15 AM
peterchech
Re: cruising dinghy in currents and beach camping

Sounds like ther really isn't much wind in this area then, maybe something like a motor canoe with a 3.5 ob would suit the op better.

I enjoy kayaking, but when u actually have to get somewhere it is really hard work and a little boring too. So for me it's sailing or nothing. Too bad, kayaking is an infinitely more affordable hobby :-)
08-25-2012 07:22 AM
caberg
Re: cruising dinghy in currents and beach camping

FWIW, I lived in Bellingham, WA for three years (absolutely beautiful spot), and while sea kayaking around the islands was popular, I can't recall ever seeing or hearing of people exploring the area in a sailing dinghy or similar (absent a few who might putt around within a few 100 yards of shore). Not that it couldn't theoretically be done, I just didn't find that people did it, likely for the reasons already stated by a few folks.

Unfortunately, I did not spend too much time on the water there (the mountains were what had me there), but from the experience I did have, I can't imagine feeling comfortable navigating around those parts without a motor. But I'm kind of an over-prepared, over-thinking weenie too.

Lastly, if you do want to see what can go wrong, check out the episode "Swept Away" from the discovery show "I Shouldn't Be Alive"--which takes place in this area.

Discovery Channel :: I Shouldn't Be Alive :: Episode Guide
08-25-2012 12:27 AM
Ferretchaser
Re: cruising dinghy in currents and beach camping

few jears ago I was out in north scotland and was ancored of the entrance of Loch Linnhe when a dink ( sturdy klinker built but a dink ) pulled up and the young couple asked me if there where any more interesting places to visit along the scottish coast and all they had was a road map of scotland. I thought they had a strange accent and asked them where they were from and it transpired that they had sailed that nutshell with a iglu tent they could sort of put up in it if they took the mast out and their camping srtove ......from Island.
People think I am nuts sailing single handed the wrong way over the pond at the wrong time of year but to answer your question...... it is possible to do most things if you want to. ( disclaimer ....don't try this at home .... or only at home kids )

ATB

Michael
08-24-2012 11:50 PM
Bilgewater
Re: cruising dinghy in currents and beach camping

Quote:
Originally Posted by driggers View Post
Thanks for this suggestion, my partner and I just registered for the 14 week "basics and essentials" and we would not have discovered it had it not been for this reply
That's great...glad to hear it.
However I don't think your taking the right one. This is the one I was referring to. Boating Safety with Juan de Fuca Power Squadron, Victoria, BC
It's an introductory course that lasts 15 weeks but covers the whole shebang and it starts from scratch. The other one you're referring to seems a bit weak to me but I could be wrong. I had actually never heard of "basics & essentials" until you posted it.
Just my thoughts, in any case it's good that your getting into it...should be fun.
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