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  #11  
Old 04-21-2013
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Re: My last little bit of planning

Lazarettes, thank you.

THe, lazarettes, are good in that they are sealed from the cabin.

More than 10 gallons huh? How much would you recommend? I could probably fit 12 -15 in one lazarette comfortably. Right now I have 6, and 3 life jackets, and alot of room.
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Old 04-21-2013
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Re: My last little bit of planning

Before you get to Desolation's upper reaches fuel will not be a problem - and even up there you're never very far from Refuge, Heriot, or Lund depending where you are. Unless you're planning to go to the heads of Bute or Toba inlets I think you're overthinking this - esp if you get reasonable sailing conditions.

How long far can you travel on your tank? 6 gals at 5 knots.. maybe 4-5 hours? 20-25 miles give or take depending on tides. btw remember to experiment with throttle settings and fuel consumption.. don't just crank her on full throttle and go. You'll probably find that backing off the throttle costs little if any speed, makes less waves and stretches your fuel supply. A jerry can with another 6 gals should put you within range of a fuel stop pretty well anywhere south of the rapids.
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Old 04-21-2013
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Re: My last little bit of planning

A battery powered handheld GPS would make your life a lot easier. Much more reliable than your iphone. Does the Yamaha have an alternator and is it wired to charge your battery?

And a dedicated line to tie off to the shore in places where the depth or slope of the bottom prohibit anchoring securely will increase your options for places to hang out and read all those books.
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Re: My last little bit of planning

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Originally Posted by fryewe View Post
And a dedicated line to tie off to the shore in places where the depth or slope of the bottom prohibit anchoring securely will increase your options for places to hang out and read all those books.

Good call.. you'll need a minimum of about 350 feet.. in most places that will be enough to run ashore and back to the boat for early release.

Here's a bit of a 'how to'.....

Stern tying
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Old 04-21-2013
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Re: My last little bit of planning

Standing rigging: Looks can deceive. If you rig a light line so you can run a terrycloth or jersey rag up and down the rigging, do that and see if there are any meathooks that tear at the cloth. Even one tear means the rigging is failing, worse inside where it can't be seen.

Seafoam: Forget it. The stuff is light oil, alcohol, and naphtha (a primary component of gasoline) and there's no magic in it. The alcohol ignites, in theory blows some carbon off things, the oil is there because now the cylinder walls have been scrubbed, the naptha is there just to extend and carry the rest. You can pour some rubbing alcohol or drygas and light oil into your fuel and do the same thing, but who would?

Safety equipment: DO invest in better pyrotechnics. If you have the basic three meteors that most kits have, they're fairly useless. As are the 12-g pistols. Good pyros are damned expensive, but if youre budget allows, do get some better ones. Although these days, a personal distress beacon might well be better economy.

IIRC some of the fuel docks tend to run seasonal up that way, before the summer season you may need to wait until someone comes home, or for the weekend, etc. before the pumps are accessible. You'd want to check that ahead.

And you might want to file a float plan, just in case.

Beautiful country.
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Re: My last little bit of planning

Is it much harder to singlehand a sternline? I had kindof ruled that out because I worried my anchor would fail and I would get puled into shore, but mybe that's better anyways because otherwise if my anchor failed I'd end up asleep out in the middle of the strait.
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Re: My last little bit of planning

Quote:
Originally Posted by northoceanbeach View Post
Is it much harder to singlehand a sternline? I had kindof ruled that out because I worried my anchor would fail and I would get puled into shore, but mybe that's better anyways because otherwise if my anchor failed I'd end up asleep out in the middle of the strait.
First make sure your anchor is set. I have watched many folks fail to set anchor when stern-to, I do not understand their thinking.

Most folks are pretty cooperative and will help with your stern line. Just have then go around the ring or tree and then back to your boat.

Are you looking 150' total for ground tackle on the Bruce. That may not be sufficient. Use a lead line to check depths below your rudder when stern-to.

I am not a big fan of wool, I prefer polypropylene socks and underwear. Get some reef walkers; I use them for boat shoes and they are great for going ashore. Keens water sandals are also great. Consider some sea boats. I have almost given up on sailing shoes in favour of closed toe sandals and boots. Bring a bathing suit; Desolation has the warmest water north of Panama and the the fresh water lakes are also swimable. I would only take one set of foulies. Add some work gloves for anchoring.

Add Sailing Directions and either Northwest Boat Travel or Waggoner to your publications.

Get Navionics for your iPhone, it has marina, fuel dock and other phone numbers.

You did not list Canadian charts.
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Re: My last little bit of planning

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
First make sure your anchor is set. I have watched many folks fail to set anchor when stern-to, I do not understand their thinking.

Most folks are pretty cooperative and will help with your stern line. Just have then go around the ring or tree and then back to your boat.

Are you looking 150' total for ground tackle on the Bruce. That may not be sufficient. Use a lead line to check depths below your rudder when stern-to.

I am not a big fan of wool, I prefer polypropylene socks and underwear. Get some reef walkers; I use them for boat shoes and they are great for going ashore. Keens water sandals are also great. Consider some sea boats. I have almost given up on sailing shoes in favour of closed toe sandals and boots. Bring a bathing suit; Desolation has the warmest water north of Panama and the the fresh water lakes are also swimable. I would only take one set of foulies. Add some work gloves for anchoring.

Add Sailing Directions and either Northwest Boat Travel or Waggoner to your publications.

Get Navionics for your iPhone, it has marina, fuel dock and other phone numbers.

You did not list Canadian charts.
I'm a half polypro, half wool guy. I was pure synthetics for the last several years, but some of the new "sportwool' I'm starting to like.

Books, and Canadian guide books I definitely am adding those to the to get list. I forgot a bit about Canadian guides.

Footwear does need to be improved, I'll see what I can do about that.

I read Faster's article on Stern Anchoring, and believe I will employ that when I find those tiny coves he describes, or when the summer picks up and more and more boats are coming. Thank you for writing that faster.

I thought someone told me a couple weeks ago back when I was learning to anchor not to stern tie, and not to double anchor. I'll have to re read that post and see if I can find out why.
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Re: My last little bit of planning

For lightweight socks I always preferred polypro but Tilley, Wigwam and some other folks are making merino wool socks (& blends) that are worth putting on the "you won't pry them from my cold dead hands" list. They stay dry, last forever, rinse easily. Not cheap but worth looking at.

Wet suit booties can also make surprisingly good deck shoes. Semirigid or rigid soles, no support, but the neoprene grips well and obviously they keep your feet warm, even soaking wet. Pack down small like camp slippersox, too.
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Re: My last little bit of planning

Quote:
Originally Posted by northoceanbeach View Post

I thought someone told me a couple weeks ago back when I was learning to anchor not to stern tie, and not to double anchor. I'll have to re read that post and see if I can find out why.
The stern tie is essential in tight anchorages like Princess Bay on Wallace Island, and in situations in which you are anchoring on steep drop-offs as described in Faster's link. In the former there is no swing room, in the latter swinging will result in the anchor coming out of the bottom.

I have never seen anyone on two anchors in the PNW. I do it when teaching, but never spend the night on two. I have done so in storms in Mexico and Turkey and to reduce swing room to avoid reefs and wrecks in the Caribbean.
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