Transporting a PSC 37 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Boat Builders Row > Pacific Seacraft
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 01-22-2014
International Bum
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 18
Thanks: 9
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Ken PSC37 Atlas is on a distinguished road
Send a message via Skype™ to Ken PSC37 Atlas
Transporting a PSC 37

I have moved back to Michigan and will be moving my boat from Rockland Maine to Marquette Mi (on lake Superior) in the spring. I will likely be having a hauling company out of Rockland trailer the boat the whole way.

Does anyone have any good advice for the move? Prepping the boat? Things to do before? Horror stories to avoid? Should I store the boom below or on deck? Good ways to prep the mast?

Also, I will likely end up with the boat on stands for a week or so while I do some work and get the mast stepped. As I'm not near the boat now, can anyone tell me how many stands I should get and how tall? Any info or pics on the setup on stands would help.

As always, thank you for the groups help!
__________________
SV Atlas
1989 PCS 37 Hull #206

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Home Port: Rockland Maine

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 01-23-2014
Norstar's Avatar
Coastal Carolinas
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Little River, SC
Posts: 95
Thanks: 3
Thanked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Norstar is on a distinguished road
Re: Transporting a PSC 37

Check out the following link for some good general info on transporting.

Triton Yachts | Yacht Broker | Yacht Hauling | Oriental NC

John S
S/V Norstar
PSC 34 #201
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 01-25-2014
whimbrel's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tubac, AZ
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
whimbrel is on a distinguished road
Re: Transporting a PSC 37

Hi Ken

We transported out PSC 37 yawl Nov 2012 from Rockland ME to Tucson AZ with Journey's End and were very pleased with the service. Ken Follett with the Ohara Corporation arranged the paperwork and schedule for the contracted transport. Try for a flexible schedule to save a little $$.

Cilantro was on the hard in S Bristol ME where we did much of the prep for transport and Bittersweet Boatyard unstepped the mast and did the final prep. The dodger, dinghy and all running rigging and blocks went below as did the booms suspended by rope and stabilized from swinging and wedged with soft gear. We used some automotive window plastic (sticky one side) to cover ports and hatches but that is probably not needed in your case as the trip is shorter and not in the dusty W & SW USA.
Only the lifelines were left up on deck and we didn't use any shrink wrap on advise it was likely to be more of a problem than not for the driver if it started to tear.
The masts are transported on stands on the trailer but try to really secure the standing rigging well so as to minimize chafe with the mast (lots of stretch wrap).

See our blog post at svcilantro (can't put a link in this reply yet) for some photos of the stands used in Tucson where the boat stayed in a storage yard for a month before another Transport Company picked her up to take her to San Carlos Mexico. We used Marina Seca transport for this leg of the journey.

Good luck with the transport.

Curtis Smith
sv Cilantro PSC37 yawl
hull #334
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Curtis Smith
S/V CILANTRO
1998 PSC Crealock 37, Hull #334
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 01-26-2014
s/v Pelagic
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 28
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
jnewcomer is on a distinguished road
Re: Transporting a PSC 37

We trucked our C37 yawl from Los Angeles to Seattle in 2012 and had a good experience. We stowed both booms and the mizzen mast on deck wrapped with moving blankets from Harbor Freight. The bottom two sections of the furler were removed the rest of the furler and stay were tied between the pulpit and pushpit frames and tied to the lifelines. The remaining stay was curved into the cockpit and secured. Since we were going to paint the masts and booms we stripped all the hardware off all the spars.

We've never hauled and secured the boat with fewer than 3 stands per side and often one under the bow, so that's seven. Each side stand should be secured to it's opposite number with a chain that runs under the keel. You never know when a torrential rain or earthquake might compromise whatever the stand is sitting on and the chains keep the stand from moving away from the hull.

Hope this helps.

John
s/v Pelagic
1980 C37 Yawl #22
Lying Lake Union, Seattle
Attached Thumbnails
Transporting a PSC 37-img_0921a.jpg  
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 01-26-2014
International Bum
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 18
Thanks: 9
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Ken PSC37 Atlas is on a distinguished road
Send a message via Skype™ to Ken PSC37 Atlas
Re: Transporting a PSC 37

Thank you everyone for the feedback! I have been talking to Ken at Journey's End, and will likely use them for the transport. I'm sure it will go well, but I'm sure it will also be a stessful week before I have the boat safe and sound floating in Lake Superior.
__________________
SV Atlas
1989 PCS 37 Hull #206

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Home Port: Rockland Maine

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 02-07-2014
BMLipiec's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Camp Pendleton, CA
Posts: 78
Thanks: 2
Thanked 10 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 6
BMLipiec is on a distinguished road
Re: Transporting a PSC 37

Ken,
We moved our 34 in 2010 from Maryland to California and did all of the prep work ourselves. We got some really good advice from various folks and it worked out well for us.

Mast:
I removed the mast head antennae, instruments, and lights, spreaders and running light, but otherwise left everything else in place.
I probably went overboard in wrapping the mast but I slept better at night. First, I wrapped the entire mast in bubble wrap and packing tape (I had extra rolls from moving before so used what I had) from top to bottom. Then, I wrapped duct tape over the bubble wrap and packing tape every couple of feet. Even if the bubble wrap tore enroute (which it did not), it couldn't go anywhere or tear very far due to the duct tape.
Lastly, I bought some carpet remnants and wrapped and duct taped it in place where it made contact to the trailer cradle.

I left the two furlers attached, but inserted a 6 foot length of 2x6 into the mast to extend the length a couple of feet which allowed me to secure the furlers to the 2x6 with light line and then duct tape. I used a couple scrap pieces of 1x4 on either side of the 2x6 to make it fit snugly and then used a couple of screws, through existing holes in the mast, and some duct tape to secure it in place. Each furler was wrapped separately in bubble wrap and then duct taped securely to the mast. The mast and furlers arrived with zero damage.

Boom:
I used packing blankets wrapped around the boom and tied in place with a long piece of line. The boom was tied up on the side deck of the boat for the trip. We had no problems or damage.

Exterior of the boat:
We were told that you have to secure the boat as if it was to endure hurricane force winds (80 mph). Someone recommended taping the hatches shut to prevent wind getting underneath and blowing them open. I didn't think that could happen to our bomars but decided it was cheap insurance anyway. I didn't think duct tape would be easy to remove from gelcoat so I wrapped the perimeter of the hatch with blue painters tape and then wrapped duct tape around the painters tape. The idea is not to hold down the hatch but to keep wind from getting underneath it.
We removed the bimini, dodger and dorados but were able to leave the stanchions in place. I used some line to secure the Monitor windvane.

Interior of the boat:
I was told a story about loose items in lockers or locker doors coming ajar and banging around for 3000 miles causing damage to the woodwork, so we tried to secure everything we could. We cleared the house of bath towels and wrapped anything of value before putting it in lockers. The anchors were wrapped in packing blankets and stored inside with the sails, and everything else that I could fit down below. I put most everything down low to preclude things falling from places higher up. Our cabinet doors did not latches on them so we used some blue painters tape to help keep them closed.

Securing the boat:
I was very impressed with the trucking company and the driver spent hours getting everything just right. However, I did have him change how he tied down the front of the boat. He had rigged tied down ropes to the bow and aft on each side. In the rear he used the aft main cleats, but on the bow he connected the ropes to the windlass. I had him use the forward cleats instead, as I think they are stronger mounting points than the windlass, not to mention the wear and tear on the windlass bearings.

Aftermath:
Overall we had zero issues with the move, not even a scratch. Lewis Trucking was great and we had no issues. They showed up exactly when they said they would (a common problem for many people as it turns out) and called us every night to let us know everything was OK. We highly recommend them.

I only had two problems - one you can't do anything about, and the other I'm not even certain it was caused by the move.
First, the deck and coach roof were dirty - really, really dirty. The whole top of the boat was covered in small black oil spots, that I think probably came from the trucks exhaust. This was a pain and took months of scrubbing with acetone to remove all of it. We tried everything that we could find that would work on glecoat (normal boat wash, multiple degreasers, etc) and nothing really worked well until I tried some acetone which took it off pretty easily (a lot of square footage though to work through). We used Bio-Solv acetone replacement because it is not as hazardous to your health as actual acetone, works great and smells good too (although my wife doesn't think so).

Second, I noticed that in the port settee locker about 6 inches aft of the table bulkhead we had some delamination of the fiberglass where the tabbing extended out from the bulkhead. I suspect that one of the hard stands on the trailer was positioned there and probably flexed the hull just enough to break the tabbing bond there. However, it could have been there all along or happened in the yard from the jack stands. I don't really know. I injected 5200 under the tabbing and rebonded it to the hull.

If possible, I would work with the driver to try and get the stands lined up with the internal bulkheads as much as possible to prevent that type of damage. A good practice anytime the boat is on jack stands and I intend to find some way of marking where stands should line up in the future.

We have more details and pictures on our website if interested. Cruising Indigo - Home
__________________
Brian & Marya
S/V Indigo
Pacific Seacraft 34
Hull #281

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 06-30-2014
International Bum
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 18
Thanks: 9
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Ken PSC37 Atlas is on a distinguished road
Send a message via Skype™ to Ken PSC37 Atlas
Re: Transporting a PSC 37

Atlas was moved to Marquette two weeks ago and put into lake superior! (Yea!) It was a little delayed due to ice on the lake, but nothing but blue water now... I figured I should write an update and tell how it went. First of all, the people that replied and gave me a ton of great information helped a ton. (THANK YOU!) I used a lot of the suggestions, and the move was a good success. No major (or even little that I've seen) damage, and everything went smooth.

Just to review - the boat was in Rockland Maine, and was moved to Marquette Michigan. I'll add a couple of pictures of the boat on the truck, the mast wrapped, and the interior before and after the move. (Pictures are worth a thousand words…)

I flew to Rockland to prep the boat and pack everything. I also had a storage locker of stuff (sails, anchors, old rigging, etc…) that I didn't usually keep on the boat but wanted to pack into the cabin.

The boat itself: Based on feedback I left the lifelines up and didn't shrink wrap. I did take down all the vents, and tape all the hatches. Everything arrived good here. I did use a little duct tape on the main forward hatch (on the metal) this was a pain to get off. For the mast step with all the wires and hardware I first stretch wrapped it with packing plastic, then duct taped it. This worked great and came right off. For the instrument cluster at the helm and wheel I first left my canvas cover on. I used a 55 gallon plastic bag over it. It fit like a giant thing made out of latex that I won't mention here. The 55 gal bag had some lose spots so I used the packing plastic wrap to firm everything up and then duct taped the heck out of it. It came through with flying colours.

Boom: I took the vang off and wrapped in bubble wrap to be stored down below. Most of the ropes and rigging I just left on (except the mainsheet) Everything was wrapped in moving blankets, plastic wrap, and duct tape. The boom ended up on the side deck of the boat resting on two life jackets and tied down. (More on that later) Everything arrived with no problems.

Mast: When I got to the marina the mast was half wrapped with the wires still in the spreaders but the spreaders taken off and wrapped flush with the mast at the marina's storage facility. The radar was crammed up against the wall and was bending the self levelling mount. I got the mast on saw horses and took all the rigging, electronics (left all the wires) and mechanical off the mast. This was a bit of a pain, and was a pain to put back, but I couldn't see shipping that mess all together. I did leave the roller fuller on for the headsail. I forget who's suggestion it was to use a piece of wood stuck into the end of the mast to secure the end of the furler, but that is what I did and it worked great! (See the pic)

Interior: I worked on the principal that everything will likely end up on the floor anyway, so my strategy was to put all of the heavy stuff in the middle of the floor wrapped in packing blankets and bubble wrap. The lighter stuff that didn't fit into cabinets all went on top of the heavy stuff. All the lockers were bungie corded shut, and packed to prevent movement. See the interior before and after pics. Most everything held together, the red floats moved from the bench to the floor (I figured they would) and the thing I was most worried about - the frame for the outside canvas, didn't move at all. They were wrapped to handholds with tape.

Everything went really well and I'm really happy with the move. I used Journey's end trucking, and the driver was great! We did let the schedule slip a week. I'd contacted them twice by phone and e-mail to confirm the week two weeks before the move, the week I flew up to pack the boat (and the week it was supposed to move) they called an old cell phone number and didn't get me so the delayed the move. Partially my fault and no real damage done. I did want a picture of the boat leaving Maine… Other than that, Journeys end moving was really good. I did have some frustrations with the service group at the marina, and felt like I had to stay on top of them (and in front of their desk) on everything. The first year I had the boat there I gave them about $15K of winter work (electronics, some fb repairs, etc…) I signed off on the work in October. I scheduled the boat to go into the water in May, and took the week off to enjoy time on the boat. They said everything was going great, but when I arrived for my week on the boat they had only just started the work a few days before. I spent the entire week trying to get them to finish the boat so I could actually sailed it. The first half of the week I had to stay in a hotel as it was on the hard. I guess that is why you can't keep a schedule on a boat…. Other small things drove me crazy, when they took the mast off instead of undoing two plugs for the wind speed and radar, they just cut the wires. It took me 30 seconds to undo the plugs, and an hour to re-wire them… The dock staff at Journeys end and the showers, bathrooms and other facilities are great. Everyone is helpful, but if you are getting service done sometimes it feels like you have to yell to get to the top of the list and I hate that.
Attached Thumbnails
Transporting a PSC 37-atlas-truck.jpg   Transporting a PSC 37-atlas-mast-wrapped.jpg   Transporting a PSC 37-atlas-interior-before.jpg   Transporting a PSC 37-atlas-interior-after.jpg   Transporting a PSC 37-atlas-splashed-lake-superior.jpg  

__________________
SV Atlas
1989 PCS 37 Hull #206

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Home Port: Rockland Maine

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Transporting a 32' Dreadnought Triona Boat Review and Purchase Forum 7 05-17-2013 02:43 PM
transporting a Columbia 22 capjoe111 General Discussion (sailing related) 3 06-28-2010 10:29 PM
transporting a boat nereussailor General Discussion (sailing related) 7 02-12-2009 11:18 PM
used PSC-34's x 2 in san diego, x 1 PSC-31 in dana point AlexHazzard Pacific Seacraft 0 08-18-2007 01:44 PM
Buying and transporting from US to UK jane pettitt Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 3 12-16-2006 01:16 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:56 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.