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  #1  
Old 06-08-2008
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Stowing sails (and other things) on deck

Just to get a thread started--how do you stow things on deck? How do you make sure they don't get washed away by a particularly nasty wave?

One thing we've done is to create a couple of canvas (Sunbrella) bags that hang on the lifelines. We put the big gennaker, oars, boat hook, long lines for various things, and other stuff. They hold the pump for the dink, the anchor windlass remote--the list goes on.

We threaded both the upper and lower lifelines through the bags (thre are reinforcing tapes and grommets as well as "tubes" of chafe-resistant fabric). The bottom is Phifertex mesh so that the bags will drain and allow some air circulation.

I posted photos for anyone interested at

http://www.sailnet.com/photogallery/...t=603&ppuser=0

Does anyone else have some on-deck stowage solutions?

Sue
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Old 06-08-2008
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Great thread idea Sue.

Your canvaswork skills put my Spray Dodger accomplishments to shame .

I've been pondering sewing up a new "burrito bag" for my inflatable, as I'm never able to fold it as compactly as it came from the factory to fit into the stock bag and to be able to lash it on the top of the forward cabin.

Also wondering how best to secure the 5g diesel fuel cans on deck.

Have seen some ideas for lashing:


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Old 06-08-2008
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With bags hanging on the lifelines or jerry cans lashed to them you are risking having the whole works ripped off and carried away on a bad day. I had a genoa lashed down on deck on a windy day and we went through a large wave which broke the lashings and carried the genoa over the side and ripped all the lifelines and stanchions off one side of the boat. It wasn't even a particularily bad day, 30 knots of wind and funny waves. I would not lash anything to the lifelines if you are going where the wind and waves could be a factor.
Besides that, it looks like the Beverly Hillbillies gone sailing.
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Old 06-09-2008
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I know what you mean about looking like the Beverly Hillbillies--I think we're already there--but it's put it on deck or don't carry it at all. There's just no room in the lazarette and none below decks. I suppose we'd have to put it below and simply stomp on it in a real blow, or donate it to Neptune.

That being the case, any ideas for a tiedown that's as secure as possible?

Sue
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Old 06-09-2008
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If you have to carry things on deck, lash them down to very stout points like eye pads or purposely fitted points. They should be located where they are least likely to take the full strength of a wave. I now lash a spare headsail down tight behind my mast where it is somewhat protected. It makes me worry though.
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Old 06-09-2008
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I'm going to back Plumper on this one. Although it's a clever idea and your stitching is impressive, I would REALLY worry about losing the arrangement to a boarding sea -- and I'd worry even more about taking a stanchion or two along with it, as well as the lifelines.

The 40 is a good sized boat. How many crew do you usually have aboard? Maybe you could go through your equipment and try to pair it down a bit, to eliminate gear that you don't really need. This might free up more space in the lazarettes. It would be nice to keep the deck and lifelines as clear as possible of obstructions.

You can tie down bulky items like oars to the hand rails, or even mount them on the stanchions (much like a whisker/spin pole) without worry. A rolled up soft inflatable would probably go best on the foredeck, in it's bag, secured tightly against the leading edge of the coachroof, via a series of folding pad-eyes (it would appear almost like an extension of the coachroof).

Unless you're primarily sailing in protected waters -- in which case you'll be fine. But most folks with a PSC 40 have more ambitious plans.
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Old 01-05-2009
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OK--taking advice in that I'm modifying the bags so that they can be removed from the lifelines and taken below, where they'll simply have to live on the cabin floor during a blow. The good news is that they'll cushion the outboard, which will also have to live on the cabin floor during a blow. The bad news, of course, is that the outboard is going to be tough to get over and there's always the possibility of leaking gasoline. Does anyone else have an idea of where to put the outboard? The genset blocks the opening to the big lazarette, so that we can only stow smaller things in it.

The RIB dinghy will have to live (mostly deflated) on the foredeck just forward of the mast, but it's lashed to eyes on the deck installed specifically for that purpose. Interestingly, another boat in the marina where we're holed up ran into some steep seas coming from Catalina to Ventura, and his RIB, also lashed to the foredeck, broke free to break the cabin windows (I use the term advisedly, since his mid-cockpit boat has large "picture" windows around the main cabin. His boat is much bigger and has about 20" more freeboard than our PSC 40--it's a good lesson.

That leaves the question of how to deal with any extra fuel beyond that carried in the installed tanks--or have cruisers in faraway places found that they don't have a problem with running low? What about gasoline for the dinghy? We originally planned to cruise with only a peanut-butter powered dink, but age and decrepitude caught up with us and we find that rowing any distance, especially with a load (people, groceries) is getting beyond us. Hence the complexity of the boat and outboard.

Thanks,

Sue

Last edited by unomio; 01-05-2009 at 03:56 PM.
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Old 01-05-2009
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I have to second John's comments. We've been cruising a 34 for over a year now. We realized early on that we just had to bite the bullet on the "extras" and limit our stowage to below decks. We know a crew who even lost, among other things, their dodger to a boarding sea. Also, I do not believe it is practical to stow on deck with the belief you can move stuff below when it gets rough. It's a catch 22. Once it gets bad enough that you decide it's time to move the gear below, it's too late to safely do it. Also, by that time, you are usually very tired and need whatever strength you have just to sail the boat.

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Old 01-23-2009
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So where do you put stuff?

In principle, I completely agree with you, Dave. But in practice I'm stumped about a lot of these questions. I am really interested in what people who have faced bad weather do with the stuff that normally lives on deck. I mean the solar panels, outboard, gennaker, extra lines, windlass remote, anchors, and stuff like that.

The quarter berth will be in use by crew, but I suppose the gennaker and any other not-in-use sails could live on the quarter berth floor--they won't mind too much being stepped upon. The outboard has to be secured, and we'll have eyes in the main cabin sole especially for that. It will make getting forward past the galley somewhat interesting (requiring Tarzan-like moves leaping across the settee while hanging onto the handrails ;^), but it will be secure. I was thinking the gennaker (in the Sunbrella bag with extra padding on top) might make a nice "cushion" between the outboard and the cabin sole.

But what about solar panels that normally live on top of the dodger? The dodger can be collapsed easily once the solar panels are removed, but where to stow them? And of course we'd like to keep them up while the sun is shining so they can do their thing making electricity, but that leads to having to get them down in the situation you mention.... What about extra lines for the sea anchor or warps? Where to put things like the blades (and possibly the pole) for the DuoGen air/water generator? Hmm--maybe this could lie atop the outboard on the cabin sole, lashed down, of course.

And last but not least, the anchors--they should be stowed belowdecks while on a passage, right? But where? The space under the V-berth might hold one but not both, and that would eliminate that storage for anything else. Not to mention that horsing 55 pounds of anchor below deck and into the V-berth would be difficult even under calm conditions. Getting the mattress off the V-berth so that one could access the stowage beneath would also be a bear, especially with the outboard in the way. But where do you put things like that? And how do you make the stowage secure enough that the anchors won't knock a hole in the stowage compartment?

What extras were you able to eliminate so that stowage belowdecks is possible?

Inquiring minds want to know....

Sue
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Old 01-23-2009
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Sue,

I would leave the anchors secured in their rollers on the anchor platform. I would not want to have to lug those back up on deck with a landfall approaching. The boat was designed with the expectation that the anchors would remain in place on passage, so the platform is robust and the boat is balanced.

The outboard motor is one item that I would leave attached to the stern pulpit, if you can't find a way to drop it into a cockpit locker. I don't think I'd want to introduce the potential for a gas or oil spill in the cabin, or a tripping hazard. If you get any gas/oil fumes below deck in bad weather, it will be a recipe for seasickness.

Just my thoughts....
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