Tack line for asymmetric PS 31 - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 23 Old 09-24-2009 Thread Starter
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Tack line for asymmetric PS 31

When I was getting First Sight outfitted this summer, I neglected to account for the tack line for my asymmetric spinaker. I have a halyard and sheet blocks.

How have any of you run the tack line back to the cockpit on the 31?

Rod Johnson
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post #2 of 23 Old 09-24-2009
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Rod,

We currently use a fixed tack line that simply attaches to the stem head fitting just forward of where the headstay attaches. It works well enough. But I will be interested to hear how others have rigged a running tack line, since that is a much better approach.

Until we hear from others, I'll mention how I currently plan to do it (when and if).

Essentially, I'd run it much like a roller furler control line, from the bow pulpit back to the cockpit via Harken Outboard Stanchion Lead Block Assemblies. There would be a fixed block shackled to the stem head fitting just forward of the headstay attachment point, and I'd terminate the control line by the cockpit with a block and cam cleat, positioned in a location such that we could get a wrap on a winch if necessary.

All in theory, of course. I have not tested the geometry yet.


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Pacific Seacraft Crealock 31 #62

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post #3 of 23 Old 09-24-2009 Thread Starter
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Tack Line

I spoke to Steve Madden of Madden Mast and Rigging in Annapolis about this issue. He and I went over the boat carefully before delivery and made sure all of the rigging was to my liking.

The one thing we neglected was the tack line.

He suggested using the rope gypsy on my windlass, but unfortunately I have only a combo chain/rope gyspsy, so I can't wrap the tack line around it.

Another option would be to run the tack line straight back to a winch on the mast, but I don't have a mast winch, and the windlass would obstruct the run.

As a third option, he suggested what you have outlined. I have a slotted toe rail, so attachment of the blocks would be easy, but a lot of clutter.

I think I am just going to run a short line back to one of the cleats on the foredeck. I won't be able to pull down the tack without putting the AS back in the sock, but oh well.

Rod Johnson

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Rod,

If you are not going to run the line back to the cockpit, why not just go with a short strop and attach it via shackle at the stemhead as we do? While not ideal, it works fine:




Here is another angle. In this photo you can also see that the Harken OSLBA's attach very cleanly to the stanchion, so fortunately it won't matter whether your boat has an extruded aluminum or teak cap rail.:



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post #5 of 23 Old 09-24-2009
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It should be run back to the cockpit some how; first for safety reasons and second for ease of trim. I suddenly became aware of this myself just a couple of weeks ago when I purchased an A-symmetrical. I don't have the same boat, but the thinking is the same.
I attached a swivel / block to my anchor roller as far forward as possible.
Than simply ran that back to the cockpit via the organizer and than through the clutch. I have one winch on the cabin top that I use.
It is my understanding that in a near broach or in a possible broach scenario, that you want to be able to release the tack; that the tack is the first thing that gets blown. I have not experienced anything like that, I am just telling you what I have been told. If it’s on the foredeck or if it’s fixed you are not going to have this option.
I also play with the adjustment of ours. Bring it down and tight for close/beam reaching (we have a gennaker and I am surprised at how angles we can actually fill the sail) and we let it out and up when the wind angles get flatter.
I think you will want to be able to control it and adjust it back at the cockpit. I just run it along the deck from the bow back with a simple swivel attached to the anchor roller.

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Some photo's,
hope you can see the tack line...
1) eased out fuller luff


2) a little tighter playing with sail shape





In this shot you can see the clutches and winch.

Although not a PS, I think the concept is the same.

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post #7 of 23 Old 09-25-2009 Thread Starter
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Thanks to both of you for the suggestions.

tjk1: your lovely family is blocking a good view of the attachment point in the bow for your block.

I think for now I have no option but to run a short strop back to a cleat. I should be able to go forward and release the line from the cleat, although not quickly. There will of course be no way to shorten the tack line under load.

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post #8 of 23 Old 09-25-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirstSightPS31 View Post
Thanks to both of you for the suggestions.

tjk1: your lovely family is blocking a good view of the attachment point in the bow for your block.

I think for now I have no option but to run a short strop back to a cleat. I should be able to go forward and release the line from the cleat, although not quickly. There will of course be no way to shorten the tack line under load.
Tim (tjk) is absolutely right, it's much better to rig a running tack line, adjustable from the cockpit.

But even with a fixed tack line, you can make adjustments to the luff tension by taking or easing on the spin halyard. It's not the preferred way, but it works alright.

I also wouldn't be too worried about the need to blow the tack line to prevent a broach. From my Melges 24 racing days, I know very well about this phenomena -- we laid that boat right over on its beam ends more than a few times. But there are several other things you'd want to do first to correct before a full blown broach ensued that necessitated releasing the tack line (drive down, ease main sheet, ease spin sheet, ease vang).

I'm not too worried about the broach situation because we typically only use the chute for sailing downwind in light-to-moderate air. Once true wind gets above 17 knots or so, that chute will be down -- long before broaching forces are coming into play. Compare that to racers, who will be putting those chutes up in all conditions even 30+ knots and will need to play that tack line.

No question, I'd prefer a running tack line. I only mention these other options as a "good enough" approach until you can get the better solution implemented.


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John:

I am already running the roller furler line aft on the port side using the Harken system you show.

I can do the same thing on starboard for the tack line.

The line would need to be adjusted by the same cockpit winches that would be used for the sheets. If the adjustment is being made on the lazy sheet side, it is no problem, but on the opposite tack I would have no winch.

So I would be tempted somehow to run it to a cabin top winch.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirstSightPS31 View Post
John:

I am already running the roller furler line aft on the port side using the Harken system you show.

I can do the same thing on starboard for the tack line.

The line would need to be adjusted by the same cockpit winches that would be used for the sheets. If the adjustment is being made on the lazy sheet side, it is no problem, but on the opposite tack I would have no winch.

So I would be tempted somehow to run it to a cabin top winch.
Unless you plan to press that sail in the higher wind ranges, I think you'd find that you very rarely need a winch to adjust the tack line. Usually a block with cam cleat is sufficient up to moderate breeze conditions. Beyond that, you can also bring the line up to the secondary coachroof winches if the primaries are busy with the spin sheet (although, we usually lead the spin sheets to the coachroof winches.)

Another option would be to add some additional purchase/mechanical advantage before the tack line gets to the block with cam cleat. You could do this by adding another block at the bow or back near the stern rail area.

Except for fouling the nice clear foredeck with a tripping hazard, I like the idea of bringing it over the coachroof to the secondary winches. That way someone can sit in "the pit" and tweak the adjustment lines.


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NEVER CALLS CRUISINGDAD BACK....CAN"T TAKE THE ACCENT
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