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  #11  
Old 08-08-2010
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Can anyone tell me what a ballpark cost for a new Yanmar 30 hp motor installed in a 31 would be?

Apart from a structural issue with the hull or something, the motor is THE most expensive refit on boat isn't it?

What might a new set of sails set one back?
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  #12  
Old 08-08-2010
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Teak is lovely for sure, but it obviously can be a negative as well.

If one of the older PSC's had a toerail that was in bad shape. Would it be likely to leak or compromise the integrity of the hull? Could it be easily replaced with something that is not Teak?
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  #13  
Old 08-08-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loos1 View Post
Can anyone tell me what a ballpark cost for a new Yanmar 30 hp motor installed in a 31 would be?

Apart from a structural issue with the hull or something, the motor is THE most expensive refit on boat isn't it?

What might a new set of sails set one back?
$8-10K for a drop-in replacement, you could do a rebuild for half
that. Sails would be about $6K for both main and headsail.
Tom
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  #14  
Old 08-09-2010
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Tom,

Thanks for the reply. Just started reading thru your blog. Way cool!! Sort of started reading near recently, then doubled back to the beginning. Guess it starts Jan 3, 2008? Feels like I'm missing some backround info though. Maybe I will learn more as I go thru it. Like, where's the homeport, NC somewhere? How old are you, and what was your experience level when you left? You say your boat is relatively new, what year? What is the draft? What do you do when not cruising? Do you have a particular long term goal with respect to sailing? There are lots more questions of course. Anyway, really enjoying the read!

Added later.... what are "the banks"?

At the end of the blog 5/4/2009, why was your pride damaged? Seemed all a success to me! The knockdown? I'd like to hear more about that! Like second to second...

Last edited by Loos1; 08-09-2010 at 10:19 AM.
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Old 08-09-2010
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Another question for any that care to reply..

How much would it cost to paint a 34' boat? I guess with Awlgrip? Do you paint the deck with this stuff? How often does a boat need bottompainting? Whatever else painting related info appreciated...
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  #16  
Old 08-09-2010
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The frequency of bottom painting depends on where you are.

Here in North Carolina, most boats stay in the water year-round, and we have pretty aggressive carpet growth in the warm months. Most boats need a bottom job every 12-18 months. I would say most people around here probably stretch that out to two years, and this can be ok if a diver cleans the bottom regularly. And of course some people stretch it farther than that - but when the bottom is coated with growth and the barnacles have taken hold, the bottom job ends up costing more anyway, and negates any savings you might have had.

There are different needs for places with warmer water, cooler water, places where the boat is on the hard for several months in the winter, etc.
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Who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little.
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  #17  
Old 08-09-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loos1 View Post
Tom,
Thanks for the reply. Just started reading thru your blog. Way cool!! Sort of started reading near recently, then doubled back to the beginning. Guess it starts Jan 3, 2008? Feels like I'm missing some backround info though. Maybe I will learn more as I go thru it. Like, where's the homeport, NC somewhere? How old are you, and what was your experience level when you left? You say your boat is relatively new, what year? What is the draft? What do you do when not cruising? Do you have a particular long term goal with respect to sailing? There are lots more questions of course. Anyway, really enjoying the read!
Added later.... what are "the banks"?

At the end of the blog 5/4/2009, why was your pride damaged? Seemed all a success to me! The knockdown? I'd like to hear more about that! Like second to second...
The blog was meant for friends&family, so that's why its missing the background info. My 31 is a 2005, I bought it new from Carolina Wind in Washington NC, who was excellent BTW, sadly I found out the guy I dealt with died when I was in Bahamas from another cruiser. I crew a couple of times on a friends boat, and took a few classes (USPS, ASA) before I bought the boat. In addition, I arranged spending a few hours practicing docking with an ASA instructor. As a singlehandler, docking can be exciting in strange marinas.
I looked for used first, I first looked at Danas then 31s. Put an offer on a 31 but it was rejected. So I bought new. Standard draft because the shoal draft has a smaller fuel tank.
I'm currently located in Oriental, NC, but this fall will start heading south to be permanent liveaboard , I'll have to start blogging again.
I made a few mistakes along the way (many groundings, misadventures during docking, etc), that's what I meant by damaging my pride.

Banks: Bahama Banks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hope that helps...
Tom
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  #18  
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Thanks for taking the time with my questions to those that have replied..

Couple more..

What exactly does it mean to commission/decommission a boat?

If a vessel is equipped with a tiller, can it be easily changed to wheel steering?
Any thoughts on advantages/disadvantages of either arrangement?
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Commissioning refers to the final fitting out of a boat and preparing her for use. For a new boat, some of the final systems and equipment are installed by the dealer as part of the commissioning process. This can but does not necessarily include things like air conditioning, ground tackle, electronics, etc. Also checking everything from thru-hulls to fuel and air filters, flushing the water tanks, stepping the mast and tuning the rig ... making sure everything on the boat is ready to work the way it should.

If a boat has been shipped via land then some of those same things have to be done and that can be referred to as commissioning or re-commissioning as well.

Decommissioning, to me, would mean the boat is at the end of its useful life and is being stripped of anything of value prior to destruction or disposal.

As for tiller vs. wheel, it's an endless debate, and if you type "tiller" and "wheel" into a search on this site you'll probably get more reading material than you bargained for. But each has its advantages and disadvantages, and just about every sailor has a preference one way or the other. Converting a boat from one to the other can be done - Pacific Seacraft has recently converted a couple older PSCs to tiller steering.
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Last edited by SecondWindNC; 08-10-2010 at 04:12 PM.
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  #20  
Old 08-10-2010
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Loos1,

With all due respect, and at the risk of being a little off topic, but in the interest of providing an alternative view point, what Pacific Seacrafts (and most of the other boats on your list) do exceptionally well is to provide a great platform for offshore and distance cruising in a short sailing length. Accomplishing that in itself is no small feat. They are also visually appealing boats from almost all angles which another good thing in my opinion.

But with all due respect to the owners and lovers of Pacific Seacraft, they do not make a very good platform upon which to learn to sail skillfully and so if learning to sail a boat well is a part of your goals then a Pacific Seacraft would be a very poor choice for your first big boat. If you really want to learn to sail well, based on my experience teaching a whole lot of folks to sail over the years, the ideal platform to learn to sail on is a boat that is comparatively small, light, simple, and responsive that you can actually tell when you are doing the right and wrong thing. And for all of Pacific Seacraft's many virtues, they lack the kind of simplicity and responsiveness that is so important in a first boat.

Similarly, the last thing you should be thinking about is converting from a tiller to wheel steering. As I read your posts, you clearly are at the very start of developing the skills to be a cruiser. There is nothing wrong with that, we have all been there. But if your goal is to become proficient then the direct feel of a tiller will provide the helpful feel that can greatly shorten the learning curve in aspects related to proper sail trim and boat handling.

In almost any other complex field of endeavor, people seem to understand that some kind of an apprenticeship and training period is required to develop the wide range of skills that are necessary to survive. With all doe respect, I would suggest that you slow down, buy an inepensive, well maintained but older used, production, moderate displacement, fin keel, spade rudder, sloop and take the time to learn how to sail and maintain it. The cost of buying and owning something like that will be tiny compared to the cost of broker's commission, depreciation and repairs if you buy the wrong dedicated offshore cruising boat, bang it up learning to sail, and the dump the poor thing in frustration, as way too often is the case with folks trying to buy their 'forever boat' for their first boat.

Respectfully,
Jeff

P.S. Commissioning refers to getting a boat into condition to use it. It can be used as simply as loading sailing gear aboard at the beginning of a voyage or sailing season. Decommsioning is the opposite, which again can mean taking a vessel out of use permanently, or as simply as removing sailing gear at the end of the sailing season, or even just stripping a small boat of sails and lines at the end of the day.
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Last edited by Jeff_H; 08-10-2010 at 11:32 AM.
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