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  #31  
Old 08-11-2010
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Sailing Fool- great advice. PHRF ratings are something I have yet to investigate. I have looked at the S&S 34 though. Very nice boats to be sure. They are not easy to find it seems.

cnolan- I have certainly not ruled this thinking out. The ability to singlehand is something that is important to me, and a go anytime boat is always best.

Andrew- Outstanding and poignant realism. Just what I would expect from a NZealander, masters of the sea! If you get that 34 in CA, give me a call, I'll come along for your return trip! We have seriously considered just what you have suggested, even considered relocating to NZ. Navigating the tax implications is a mess though, and for now at least has deterred us. Score one for the tiller! In truly crummy weather/seas, wouldn't a wheel be preferred though? I have no way to know, but it just seems easier to be standing on the centerline braced in and hanging on in such a situation if things got squirrely.

Great community here! thanks to everyone.
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  #32  
Old 08-11-2010
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Note that if you really want to sail, a little wood goes a long way. I fell for a Baba 30 before buying my PSC31. Once I considered the time commitment to care for the wood I backed off. I'm a new owner and very pleased. This design provides creature comforts in a package that I like better than my Bayfield & Cape Dory, which had the bulkhead separated V-berth. If you can spring for the '34 that's a different deal! Rob
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  #33  
Old 08-11-2010
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well i was in love with the PSC 31 and pilothouse 34s before i saw the nauticats. the nauticat 33 or 321 packs a huge amount of storage space into a 33 ft boat. pilothouse design with dual steer stations. 2 cabins with nice size berths. large cockpit locker that holds a genset, diesel heater, and liferaft in addition to the other typical flotsam of buckets, cushions, etc. absolute top of the line quality in all the construction and fittings . Ocean A rated by lloyds. other boats on my old short list included the cabo ricos and vancouver 34 pilothouse. but when i saw the nauticat i fell in love...since they are made in finland they are much more common in europe than the USA..there is an active nauticat board on yahoo.

S/v Eagleswing
port of erie PA
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  #34  
Old 08-11-2010
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Andrew

Quote:
If you really want to take the circimnavigation plunge, why not buy a boat in NZ or Australia. They are cheaper and there are plenty of high quality yards and supplies to get you away.
I know things are 25% cheaper over your side of the ditch but my research would show that comparative boats are a whole lot cheaper in the US. The Aus/NZ market opens up a lot of capable boats that are not found elsewhere.

Ken
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  #35  
Old 08-12-2010
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Since the PHRF ratings were mentioned previously, I've been doing a little research in this regard.

Does anyone have a favorite link to a comprehensive PHRF rating page for say East and West coast of the US?

What might represent an average speed rating be for a 31' moderate displacement cruiser?
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  #36  
Old 08-12-2010
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Here is one pretty comprehensive list:

http://offshore.ussailing.org/Assets...+Handicaps.pdf

However it has these two entries, which makes me doubt the validity of the data:

Boat Lowest Highest Average
PACIFIC SEACRAFT 34 192 192 192
CREALOCK 34 196 210 201
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  #37  
Old 08-12-2010
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Hmm...that does seem a little suspect..

Hey, here's a cool calculator I found, not PHRF, but some other nifty stuff.
Gives definitions as well for a little perspective.

SA / D Ratio
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  #38  
Old 08-12-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MitchM View Post
well i was in love with the PSC 31 and pilothouse 34s before i saw the nauticats. the nauticat 33 or 321 packs a huge amount of storage space into a 33 ft boat. pilothouse design with dual steer stations. 2 cabins with nice size berths. large cockpit locker that holds a genset, diesel heater, and liferaft in addition to the other typical flotsam of buckets, cushions, etc. absolute top of the line quality in all the construction and fittings . Ocean A rated by lloyds. other boats on my old short list included the cabo ricos and vancouver 34 pilothouse. but when i saw the nauticat i fell in love...since they are made in finland they are much more common in europe than the USA..there is an active nauticat board on yahoo.S/v Eagleswing
port of erie PA
Just a little correction..... the 33's or my 331 (they made the switch/upgrades in '99) are only B Rated because of the sliding pilothouse doors. Built like a tank and many are sailing the world but the doors left them out of the 'A Open Ocean' rating.
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Wickford/Narragansett Bay RI
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  #39  
Old 08-12-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loos1 View Post
Since the PHRF ratings were mentioned previously, I've been doing a little research in this regard.

Does anyone have a favorite link to a comprehensive PHRF rating page for say East and West coast of the US?

What might represent an average speed rating be for a 31' moderate displacement cruiser?
Unless you are looking to get into racing, I would not focus too much attention on PHRF ratings. They do reflect speed potential under certain conditions, but if your focus will primarily be cruising and passagemaking, they are of limited use since they do not correlate well to passage speeds for cruising boats.
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Pacific Seacraft Crealock 31 #62

NEVER CALLS CRUISINGDAD BACK....CAN"T TAKE THE ACCENT
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  #40  
Old 08-13-2010
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John raises a very valid point. PHRF ratings generally are based on a fully crewed, well prepared boat racing in the average conditions for the region in which that rating is valid. In most cases these ratings are a pretty fair indicator of relative speed in moderate conditions. In a general sense, when cruising with small crews, and in other than average conditions, the relative passage speeds will vary pretty widely from what might be anticipated with the relative passage speeds of dedicated cruising boats way slower than might be predicted by their PHRF ratings.

In other words, dedicated long distance style cruising boats generally would not have as fast a passage time as their PHRF ratings would predict relative to the passage time of a race boat or a high performance cruising boat sailed with a small crew.

There are a lot of reasons for this. Few cruising boats have the sail inventory and sail handling gear to take full advantage of the winds that they are sailing in. Few have the kind of preparation that a performance boat would have in terms of bottom finish and weight distribution.

The speed advantage of a higher performance boat, especially at the light and heavy ends of the wind and seastate range, allows it to cherry pick its routing to optimize its conditions. In other words, a higher performance boat can offen make good speeds in winds that a heavier more traditional boat can't sail in. This allows them to sail out of a light air wind system and get moving sooner. The heavier cruiser either needs to motor of sit. If motoring is anticipated, this means that the cruiser must carry more fuel, and therefore slows its speeds in the middle wind ranges. Those kinds of 'tactical' advantages are not anticipated in PHRF Ratings.

That said, in coastal cruising situations, where running the engine is not a big deal, the relative passage times for a traditional cruiser may beat their rating, but at the price of more engine hours.

Jeff
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