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Go Back   SailNet Community > Boat Builders Row > Pacific Seacraft
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  #41  
Old 08-13-2010
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I completely agree, PHRF, or the speed of the boat generally is not a deciding factor for me overall by any means. Just something to consider among various other priorities. Given my total lack of experience on the ocean, the seakindliness, or overall displacement generally, might well be at the top of the list, and by definition we'd be giving up speed to acquire that quality.
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  #42  
Old 08-18-2010
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34 31

LOOS,

My situation sounds similar to yours. Twelve years ago I fell in love with Pacific Seacraft and looked for a 34. Two years later I ended up with a 12 year old '31.

She is 22 years old now and I would never buy another boat. Like you, I dream of sailing across an ocean and I know that however good I get at sailing the boat will always be better at it than I am.

She handles gale force winds without a whimper. I came too old to sailing and I still work too much to be any good at sailing or maybe I am just a slow learner but I think with your background you will quickly learn everything you need to know with no problem by gradually increasing your experiences and staying within your limits.

As everyone knows, every boat is a trade-off but being in love with what you are sailing is worth more than anything other factor.

John Van Dinther
Watermark PSC 31 #28
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  #43  
Old 08-19-2010
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Well John, never say never! But I am glad to hear you got what you wanted and have been very happy with it.

I am a rather late starter too I'd say, and if I am truthful with myself, making a real passage of any kind is probably unlikely (unless someone else is captain!). It is a big scary ocean out there, and I'm not as brave as I once was. I am not getting any younger, and it is hard to even get started. I live in PA, and good water is somewhat distant. Just in the last day or so I've been lamenting another season gone by, and I didn't even get to reel in a single sail. Nevertheless, I am not giving up. I've been reading and learning nonstop all Summer (a virtual sailor.. :-( , whilst coming up with better and better rationale for taking the plunge on a boat. Sadly, just a few days ago my wife's sister's husband was found dead in his hot tub. He was only 52. So right now I'm ready to order a brand new boat with a/c and a bowthruster. Who needs a 401k anyway? Seriously though, an event like this has a way of altering one's perspective.

Seems like this time of year is maybe not the best for a purchase, at least in the northern climates. I imagine most people will be starting to think about pulling their boats and storing for Winter.
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  #44  
Old 08-19-2010
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Loos,
I've owned a Shannon, Bristol Channel Cutter, Valiant 42, Seawind Catamaran, Catalina, Hunter, and several dinghies. I suggest you go and buy the boat that moves you. How many times have you sailed this summer? Not sailing...... buy another Laser and get out there right now. Don't waste another good sailing day trying to figure out which boat to buy. My wife has more fun with her $350 sunfish, then our $350k Valiant. For each hour you spend doing research on the web, you should at least match it with an hour out sailing.....
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  #45  
Old 08-20-2010
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RJSD- All I can say is man, this is good advice. How many times sailing this Summer? One...as a passenger...for about 4 hrs. Most, and probably only fun this whole year. Very complicated times.. Thanks for pointing out what is important, it is very clear I've lost sight of that lighthouse.

Jamison
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  #46  
Old 08-20-2010
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Some of the sailors I meet spend so much time gazing over the horizon, planning, learning, prepping, and analyzing that they seem to get addicted to the "idea" of taking off sailing, but often stay chained to their computer, marina slip, or whatever else is holding them back.

We often forget what attracted us to sailing in the 1st place.....freedom. Sailing freedom can take on many forms and can cost almost nothing. The last time my wife and I took off long term cruising, we resigned from the San Diego Yacht Club,and unplugged completely from the organized sailing community. A few days ago we put her sunfish on top of the car with my stand up paddle board and went on down to the bay for a couple hour sail. It didn't take a Yacht Club membership or an expensive big boat to get out on the water and feel the boat moving under the sails.

As people shop for the "perfect" boat they often seem to get obsessed with making the perfect decision. After owning so many boats, we've learned that voyaging is more about us and our relationship with the sea, then about the boat. I personally like a boat that is pretty in my eye to row away from at anchor, and that adds some joy to the cruise. When you get out cruising, you see people enjoying themselves in all kinds of boats, and the minutiae of the boat's design details, and outfitting don't seem to effect the enjoyment of the cruise. You meet absolutely miserable people on new Hylas 49s and other people having the time of their lives on $10,000 Canadian whatevers. It's not about the boat.

If I was facing a PA winter coming on, I would find a nice little Vaguard Nomad or similar that I could hook up to the car and drive south out of the cold this winter for some long weekend trips sailing. Until the winter set in, I'd rent a spot close to home next to the lake or bay where I could leave the boat with the mast up on the trailer. Then I would make it a goal to not let one good sailing day go by without the boat getting wet, even if it was just for an hour of sailing.
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  #47  
Old 08-20-2010
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What great stuff RJSD. I remember as a kid, sitting with some friends on lazy afternoons waiting for a trickle of air to flutter the leaves of a small tree in the yard. When the magic moment came (more than just a passing trickle) we'd suddenly rush to our cars, throw in the sailbags, in my case with the two-piece mast protruding 3 feet out and away from the car window, race to the lake and hurriedly rig the two small dinghies to catch the Summer breezes. Those days colored the course of my life, and I have remained a particularly spontaneous sort ever since. When the wind blows, it's time to go sailing. I am not one to sit at the marina.

I started this thread not just to hear what other boats PSC lovers like, but simply to ask a variety of questions. And your reply reminded me of a question, with respect to "freedom". Some may find it odd, but the new paradigm massive security state of cameras, data collection, tasers, etc. etc. etc. is what brought me to revisit my lifelong dream of taking to the sea, and perhaps for extended cruising if I can find the courage. So here goes... When I went out on the ocean for the first time this year in a 28' sailboat (as a passenger as mentioned previously), it was a rather quiet Thurs. late afternoon. Not much activity out there (off the Ocean City NJ inlet). We were approached on two occasions by a Coast Guard boat (medium size and quick). They came to about 1/4 of a mile or so, clearly in our direction, lingered awhile, presumably training considerable optics on us to determine our activity. This happened twice during our 4 hr. cruise. Additionally, a Coast guard helicopter (and not a small one) made a pretty close pass, only 150 ft or so off the water, and maybe only 5-600 feet horizontally from us, circled, kinda buttonhooked and departed. Again, there was no one else around so they were clearly investigating us. We weren't doing anything to speak of, save perhaps drinking our lone beer of the trip so maybe that was it. All that to say this..

Is this normal? But more importantly for me, how often have some of you been boarded? Is it commonplace, and can anyone provide a synopsis of just exactly what the rules are exactly with regard to this kind of thing? While I am not guilty of anything, I take being searched by authorities in any situation very seriously and begrudgingly. I would love to hear some various stories from some of you on this matter.

And a different question....and I'd like to start a different thread on this one. For those of you that have actually set "out" to sea, and have run across the inevitable gale, can you describe the experience a little? Is it just rank fear, like one might feel for their house if a tornado was headed your way, or is there some sense of I am in control and have confidence in a successful outcome? It's those big waves crashing onto a partially submerged bow that scares me (at night?), or getting pooped I guess they call it from behind.

How many of you have had a sizeable wave of water come over the side and flood into some of those beautiful teak interiors these boats I dream about have? That would seem like a pretty substantial goof, but lots of the boats I've looked at (online) appear to have been flooded a time or two.

Thanks, and sorry so long.. hope you guys are all out on the water and don't have time to reply!
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  #48  
Old 08-20-2010
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Here's a different one I've been curious about.

How many of you sail up to a dock in your 20-40 foot boats? I of course realize that many factors might not make it feasible (or safe) in a variety of circumstances, but there are also (or so it seems) occasions when it seems perfectly feasible.

I once saw a beautiful and sleek 50 footer do it (with perfect precision) into the Inner Harbor at Baltimore. It was quite something to see! Of course they had a crew of about 7 nimble young sailors, but that's not the point.

I remember thinking out loud to my brother, hey man, we can do that! The conditions were perfect for it.
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  #49  
Old 08-21-2010
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A boat to look at in the same size range as the PSC 34 is a Caliber 33 or 35. Usually cheaper than the PSC and definitely faster, and does just fine on ocean passages. Might be on the small side for a Pacific transit but much smaller boats have done it.
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  #50  
Old 09-20-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loos1 View Post
I completely agree, PHRF, or the speed of the boat generally is not a deciding factor for me overall by any means. Just something to consider among various other priorities. Given my total lack of experience on the ocean, the seakindliness, or overall displacement generally, might well be at the top of the list, and by definition we'd be giving up speed to acquire that quality.
Loos & Everyone else out there considering ratings, here's something to have a look at.

A bit of history: John Neal on his website has a list of cruising boats and their perceived merits. The linked document below sort of grew out of that list, or at least the idea for it did. I'm not the originator of this spreadsheet but have been contributing to it over the last year or so and refer to it frequently when I'm out virtual-shopping/dreaming.

The performance specs & formulae have been taken from a variety of recognized sources and while not to be used as a definitive guide to "what's best" can certainly be an aid in comparing different designs and models.

Have a look and I hope that you all find at least some value in it.

SRW.
__________________
I am not one of those who in expressing opinions confine themselves to facts. - Mark Twain

Last edited by SeanRW; 09-20-2010 at 07:37 AM.
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