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  #1  
Old 02-23-2012
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Crealock 37 - Outfitting - Finally

We are getting ready to go cruising – finally, the real thing. Before we go, we need to finish up with installation of davits, auto pilot, vane, wind gen, windlass and watermaker. I’m hoping to get some feedback from others as to what worked for you and what you would recommend avoiding or doing differently.

This last bit of outfitting is going to take quite a bite out of the cruising kitty, but I don’t want to have to make improvements once we’re in the Bahamas or Caribbean.

Suggestions?
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Old 02-23-2012
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I would skip the davits. Not only are they ugly but they could become a liability in bad weather.
Where are you located?
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Old 02-24-2012
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outfitiing a 37

As we have been cruising on a C37 for 7 years I have a few thoughts for you.On the davits: the canoe stern just doesnt have the bouyancy of a fat broad stern(IslPkt).With a windvane,wind genny and probably solar panels plus stores,tools,spares,watermaker,extra anchors cordage etc she's going to be sitting low in the water,adding a dinghy and davits to the stern will be too much.
Wind genny: I have had an Ampair 100 for about ten years,it is silent and fairly reliable.(one major problem)and tech support is available in the US.The output is low -10 amps max.There are much higher output units available one is the D400.Silence is most important for your sanity and your anchorage neighbors.ALWAYS LISTEN BEFORE YOU BUY.
Watermaker: We have a PUR survivor 400 output approx 9 gals per hour.It is small (mounted in quarterbrth) relatively inexpensive,and relable.With good tech support in US.Prices vary by vendor so shop around I found the best price at the Annapolis boat show.
Windlass: I believe in KISS- Sl Seatiger manual .No wires ,no switches,
no electricity,very little to break and I get my aerobic excersize.
I recommend solar panels,as many as you can carry.Solar is great in the sunny cruising areas.
Batteries: Alarge bank is your friend ,as many amps as you can carry and charge.I have a seperate 140amp Balmar alternator to keep the bank charged in addition to solar and wind.
Hope this helps,
Dianne and Chuck Burke S/V Nifty Nickers C37 #139
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Old 02-26-2012
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Crealock 37 Outfitting

SV Lagniappe,

We bought our 1980 C37 Yawl (#22) in 1988 and have lived aboard most of that time--both in marinas while still working and while cruising Mexico after retirement. A few of our opinions on outfitting:

I agree with Nifty Nickers about the waterline. We finally painted over the waterline stripe since it was underwater most of the time anyway and was just getting fouled.

Watermaker (nice to have): Spectra 180C below quarter berth (where the batteries used to be). Expensive but very useful for remote area cruising.

Electric windlass (nice to have): Lighthouse 1501 electric. Expensive but we are much more likely to re-anchor for a better set or to move away from other boats with the electric. We had a SL 555 manual before this one.

Windgen (nice to have): KISS mounted on the mizzen above the radar. Reliable with good output when the wind blows.

Solar panels (essential): Four 80W panels. Two on top of hard dodger one each side forward of gate connected to Blue Sky MPPT controller. An essential system for staying out of marinas and not using the engine to charge batteries.

400+AH house bank (essential): midships below settee "L" We have four Group 31 AGM's plus a Group 27 engine starting battery and a combiner.

Autopilot/Windvane (essential): Monitor + tillerpilot is our autopilot and windvane. This setup will work with a wheel as well. Also a Raymarine S100 remote for tweaking the pilot. A below deck pilot would be nice but we haven't needed it.

Radar (essential): Raymarine SL70 mounted on RAM arm above chart table. We're surprised how much we have used radar during nightwatch and fog.

AIS Receiver (essential): Standard Horizon 2100 VHF with AIS and RAM Mic. We wanted a one box AIS system since our chartplotter won't dispaly AIS targets and we didn't want the PC on all the time. The remote mic can display AIS targets in the cockpit.

A few other items we've found useful while cruising: 1500W charger/inverter (short duration use), Honda 1000 generator (long duration use) (Note: it will fit in the large starboard cockpit locker--the 2000 won't), 120A alternator, 12V refrigeration, fans everywhere including the head and cockpit (when sleeping outside in the heat), screens (with no-see-um bonnets), awnings with side curtains, lazy jacks, drifter in a sock with a pole (I'd go with a Code 0 and a furler now).

About davits. I agree the C37 is not ideal for them (Google images does find photos of them). In Mexico we saw most people using them to lift the dingy & outboard at night for security but not on passage. We use the spinaker halyard for the same purpose and let the dinghy lean against the shrouds high enough that someone standing in a panga can't reach the outboard (what they are after mostly). On passage the dinghy fits upsidedown between the inner forestay and the mast.

Hope this is of some use. If you want more details on any of these systems feel free to email us at: pelagic_sails@hotmail.com

Fair winds,
John
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Old 02-28-2012
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Some Thoughts on Outfitting Your 37

We have owned, and outfitted, a Crealock 34 (#246) and a Crealock 37 (#301), and based on our experience we would recommend, first of all, reading Beth Leonard’s book, The Voyager's Handbook, which we believe to be the best written and most helpful advice available on outfitting, provisioning, and preparation for voyaging.

As for hardware, the two things we would not do without are a Monitor windvane and an electric windless, preferably a Lighthouse with a chain wildcat and a rope capstan. If you need new sails or are re-cutting an existing suite, we unequivocally recommend Carol Hasse’s loft, Port Townsend Sails, in Port Townsend, WA.

As for electronics, we insist on Garmin whenever their products are available; based upon my experience – both military and civilian – I avoid Raytheon products.

After 46 years of flying experience that spans from 85hp Aeronca’s to F-4B Phantoms, I (Tim) have never run across electronics that are as reliable and “bullet-proof” as Garmin’s. Installed a Garmin moving map GPS in one of our Bonanzas that was not IFR-certified, and it was fully capable of shooting IFR approaches with absolute precision. Moreover, it never required any tweaking or repair over the 5+ years of usage. Similarly, we can’t replace our 17 year-old hand-held GPSMAP 165 simply because it still functions beautifully and the damn thing won’t die after being used on three previous boats. Based on our great experience with Garmin products we will be installing a Garmin radar and display in Ruby within the next 12 mos.

Hope this helps. Fair winds.

The Cruisin' Cronins
Melisse & Tim Cronin
s/v Ruby
Pacific Seacraft
Dana 24 No. 101

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ /) ~~~~~~~~

"Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous people, for they may act their dream with open eyes and make it possible." – T.E. Lawrence
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Old 02-28-2012
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Question Crealock 37 Outfitting

The concern about the Crealock 37 not having a lot of buoyancy in the stern is a concern of mine, but struggle with picking up an inflatable and outboard every night when on the hook and removing the outboard and storing the inflatable on deck every time we get underway is also a big problem. For the 1st year we will be in the Gulf of Mexico, Bahamas, northern Caribbean and east coast as far north as Maine. We don't envision any "long pasages" greater than 2 or 3 days so there will be a lot of time spent in the dinghy running ashore or from boat to boat.

I agree completely that we would need to store the boat on deck instead of the davits if we will be underway and there is any possibility of heavy weather. The other downside is that we can't use a Monitor or any other vane, for that matter, with an inflatable on davits.

Suggestions??
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Old 03-14-2012
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Re: Crealock 37 - Outfitting - Finally

Greg / LizAnn:

We used our aluminum Forespar spinnaker pole that was attached to a genoa track on the face of the LeFeil mast as a crane arm to lift our dinghy with a 4-point harness. No science or calculations were involved; we figured that if the pole and fitting could handle the wind-load imposed by a cruising gennaker, it could also handle the load imposed by the dink sans outboard engine. We were proved right as far we went, but there is no hard analysis to validate our choice. While the grapite composite poles are amazingly light, we were concerned that wear and tear, UV exposure, etc. might render a high tech pole less resiliant, and given the initial cost we stayed with a known aluminum product.

It should be noted that the dinghy was a 80-pound, 9.5-foot Gig Harbor hard dinghy [www.ghboats.com] equipped with a u-shaped “Dinghy Dog” inflatable tube collar. This affords the best of both worlds in that the hard dinghy was rugged and more puncture resistant, and the “Dingy Dog” tube inflation collar afforded us great load capacity. We also opted for the 12-volt Minnkota trolling motor equipped rudder that minimized the need to utilize – and lift/lower - a gasoline outboard. Another reason that we went with a hard dinghy is that it is easier to get to the lifeline and flip than an inflatable for storage on the foredeck, just aft of our staysail’s roller furler.

As for the lifelines, we never got around to putting pelican hooks on the upper life lines at the bow pulpit so that we could create a “loading gate” that permitted placing the dink on the lower life line as you flip the boat for stowage on the foredeck. It seems to be a good idea, at least in theorey.

Regarding the lifting harness, there are an almost infinite variety of commercially made units as well as instructions in sailing periodicals and books (the Pardys, the Dashews, Calder, Casey, etc.) for making and rigging your own.

Hope this helps. Fair winds.

The Cruisin’ Cronins
Melisse & Tim Cronin
s/v Ruby
Pacific Seacraft
Dana 24 No. 101

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ /) ~~~~~~~~~~

"Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous people, for they may act their dream with open eyes and make it possible." – T.E. Lawrence
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Old 04-12-2012
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Re: Crealock 37 - Outfitting - Finally

Davits
Not enough bouyancy in the rear of the boat for davits.
At night at anchor, rig a 4 point bridal for dinghy, attach a halyard and
haul it up to just below the cap rail.
Underway bring it up on deck.
After a bit of time with a small Avon RIB, I have always had roll-up inflatables as dinghys, for short trips in good conditions I have towed them but for anything longer they come up on deck, are deflated, roll up and tied down on deck. For some offshore trips it was stowed below under the table.

Auto pilot

WH autopilot, great device - the components other then the electronics are standard hydraulic pieces easily replaceable. Not that I have ever had to replace anything after 14 years.

Vane
Monitor Windvane, no question

Wind gen
I like quiet and I don't like the idea of blades spinning around above my head, I opt for solar and the solar keeps up with everything except for the watermaker.

Windlass
Lofrans, the boat originally had a manual windlass and I was so happy I replaced it with an electric one with a manual overide. Its been totally
dependable and there is no question that the anchor is coming up if I am not happy with where I have dropped the anchor the first time - or the second - or the third or .....

Watermaker

Pur 80
Worked well, but I would rather have a unit that could generate water faster.
Listening to the thing run for 12+ hours to fill up a 40 gallon tank is not an enjoyable experience.

Marc
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Old 04-13-2012
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Re: Crealock 37 - Outfitting - Finally

If you really want davits only, check out Atkins and Hoyle Ltd. - #1 Dinghy and Tender Solutions
I have one for lifting the dingy engine and it's great. Swings out of the way and easily breaks down for storage. They will custom cut tubes to fit your needs.
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