Fuel tank longevity - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Boat Builders Row > Pacific Seacraft
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 04-11-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
AlLorman is on a distinguished road
Re: Fuel tank longevity

I stuck a plain old digital camera in my tank through the inspection port and got great photos.

Al Lorman
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 04-11-2013
scuppersinspired's Avatar
scuppersinspired
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: PNW
Posts: 27
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 0
scuppersinspired is on a distinguished road
Re: Fuel tank longevity

Anyone care to share the cost of a tank replacement? I'm in the middle of looking at an 81 with the original tank. It was electroplated a while back but it still makes me nervous. There is water in the bilge. Any experiences with electroplating?
thanks -Scup

Last edited by scuppersinspired; 04-11-2013 at 03:42 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 04-11-2013
svjobeth's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 160
Thanks: 7
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 6
svjobeth is on a distinguished road
Re: Fuel tank longevity

With the inspection plate off, it's easy to use a handheld or point & shoot type camera to get pictures of the internal tank sections, as Al mentioned. For the external undersides, I use a scope or snake type camera. The one I have is from Costco, and shoots still images and video. It costs around $100 and extends to 3' and is extendable to 6'. It's also water resistant to 9' or so, if memory serves. They can also be found at stores like Home Depot, Lowes, AutoZone, etc. It's proven to be very handy on the boat.
__________________
Bill & Lisa Ballard
S/V Jo Beth
1984 Pacific Seacraft Crealock 34, Hull #16

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover."
- Mark Twain
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 04-11-2013
whimbrel's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tubac, AZ
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
whimbrel is on a distinguished road
Re: Fuel tank longevity

Hi Folks,

The PSC 37 tank Bob mentioned is mine (1998) and it was luckily leaking when the boat was on the hard. However, it came as a surprise since when I purchased it 2 years ago the tank had already been leaking and repaired & I figured this would have been adequate.

Mainsail is right about the "production shavings" but in my case it was the saw dust and left over construction materials that were found under the tank in the bilge that kept it damp from below that contributed to the corrosion. I also wonder about boats laid up for the winter with water in the bilge some of which is salt water from the anchor. Sitting for months like this could also contribute to the corrosion. The tank sits on glassed in, half round, pvc pipe covering the keel bolts. You will have to remove the tank to find out about the corrosion since looking at it from above, it looks great.

The repair that was done did not include a primer of any kind and the corrosion was worse in this repair area and near the welds but then it is the lowest area of the tank and most subject to corrosion from the bilge water. Photos are attached.

A new tank from Pacific Seacraft is $1,950 plus shipping. The good news is that they are easy to remove and re-install. Cleaning up the diesel mess and pumping it out was much worse given my lack of experience in doing this. Don't bother trying a siphon.


Curtis Smith
s/v Cilantro
Tubac, AZ
Attached Thumbnails
Fuel tank longevity-psc-37-bilge.jpg   Fuel tank longevity-img_0488.jpg   Fuel tank longevity-img_0490.jpg   Fuel tank longevity-img_0489.jpg  
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 04-12-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
AlLorman is on a distinguished road
Re: Fuel tank longevity

When I looked into the cost of a new aluminum tank for my 31 last year, the prices ranged from about $500 (from the guy who built the original tanks in CA) to about $1,200 in Annapolis.

As to emptying the tank, I found that a cheap pump designed to pump kerosene did the job just fine for about $20. Battery Operated Pump Kerosene Gas w Auotostop Buzzer | eBay

Al Lorman
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 04-12-2013
BMLipiec's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Camp Pendleton, CA
Posts: 78
Thanks: 2
Thanked 10 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 6
BMLipiec is on a distinguished road
Re: Fuel tank longevity

There is another option for emptying your tank, if you have an electric fuel pump installed. I disconnected the fuel supply line at the mechanical lift pump and added a three foot piece of hose with a double hose barb, which allowed me enough hose to stick into a fuel can. Then you just need to run your electric pump to pump it dry (I pulled the instrument panel audible alarm wire temporarily in order to mute the oil pressure alarm). Most of the Walbro type pumps, pump at around 20 gals/hour, so it isn't fast, but it is easy and effective. The biggest advantage to this is that you are running your fuel through your Racor filter and polishing it in the process. This will also give you an indication of how dirty your fuel is/was by checking your filter afterwards.
__________________
Brian & Marya
S/V Indigo
Pacific Seacraft 34
Hull #281

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 04-12-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 168
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 13
niftynickers is on a distinguished road
Re: Fuel tank longevity

I've seen that inspection camera at Costco-thought it would be great for do-it-yourself colonoscopy. Just a thought.
Chuck Burke S/V NiftyNickers
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 04-22-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 204
Thanks: 0
Thanked 13 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 8
BirdBrain333 is on a distinguished road
Re: Fuel tank longevity

Dear Bob,

A bit late but .... you asked about PVC tanks and all I can say is DON'T!!! The tank on our 1986 PSC 37 was original but weeping slightly and obviously ready to let go. We had a plastic tank "welded" so we'd never have to worry about it again. WRONG. Two years later it sprang leaks in 11 different locations, some from poorly welded seams and some from cracks near corners and other stressed areas.

We just hauled the tank out and got a new one from Pacific Seacraft. It was a perfect fit and about the easiest job I've ever done on a boat (except for cleaning up the bilges, that is).

Jay, enjoying the lack of diesel smell!!!!

PSC #171, Kenlanu currently in Oriental, NC
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 04-28-2013
34crealock's Avatar
Maine Dub
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Maine
Posts: 206
Thanks: 23
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 2
34crealock is on a distinguished road
Re: Fuel tank longevity

After reading the above comments I decided to yank out my fuel tank for two reasons, to see how much it holds and check for corrosion. ( PC 34 # 286, almost 20 years old)the tank holds 32 gallons and had minor corrosion behind the screws that secure the tabs to the hull. The bottom and sides of the tank had a gray sort of non skid coating of some kind which was peeling on the bottom of the tank. The bare parts were stained by bilge but not corroded. The hull already had a half pipe insert to keep the tank from sagging onto the keel bolts. I plan to get it pellet blasted and coated with truck bed liner. The tank was very easy to remove and lug out of the boat.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 04-29-2013
34crealock's Avatar
Maine Dub
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Maine
Posts: 206
Thanks: 23
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 2
34crealock is on a distinguished road
Re: Fuel tank longevity

Plan B. After cleaning the scuzzy goo off of the bottom of the tank I found several corroded spots including a deep 3/4 of the way through the alloy corroded spot about 1/4 by 2 inches in the lowest part of the aft end of the tank. I guess I dodged a bullet. Thanks to our discussion my checking the tank saved me a bilge full of fuel halfway to Bermuda. Front Street Shipyard is welding me a new,thicker tank and we are coating it with zinc chromate. It will be about $1100.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need a new fuel tank AlLorman Pacific Seacraft 26 09-16-2011 12:08 PM
PSC 34 fuel tank mondofromredondo Pacific Seacraft 8 11-17-2009 05:22 PM
fuel tank mike dixon Gear & Maintenance 1 11-05-2009 08:35 AM
11.0 Fuel tank S2 Dave S2 1 08-14-2006 10:30 PM
Fuel tank doalmo Gear & Maintenance 0 10-13-2004 02:39 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:22 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.