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-   -   Pearson 31-2 fresh water head conversion (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/pearson/91899-pearson-31-2-fresh-water-head-conversion.html)

littlelizzy 09-09-2012 02:04 AM

Pearson 31-2 fresh water head conversion
 
Took the hose that goes from the starboard side water tank to under the sink and re routed it to the hose that feeds the head in the starboard compartment by the bulkhead. Shut off the sea ****, bought a coupler to join these two hoses and now use one tank to flush fresh water in the head. Added some bleach to the tank (cup) Big deal in salt water as the smell that comes from all the little plankton and other sea life that dies and rots in the head and respective lines is not real pleasant. So far so good and the smells are gone! about 3 hours and under ten bucks!

GaryHLucas 09-09-2012 05:31 PM

Pearson 31-2 fresh water head conversion
 
I hope you realize that you now have what may be drinking water connected to a sewer line. On land that is illegal unless you have backflow prevention device. A house toilet does that by using a gravity tank. It would be bad to make someone sick on your boat.

sccapstick 09-16-2012 06:19 PM

Re: Pearson 31-2 fresh water head conversion
 
Although I have now moved on to a Pearson 28-2 (1986, Hull #41), my 1980 Hunter 27 had a system that solved the problem of salt water going foul in the toilet intake line when the boat is left idle, with the following set up

The galley sink drained through a T into a through-hull with a stopcock, and on the other side of the T was a stopcock to a line that feeds the toilet with salt water. If you want saltwater in the toilet you open the through-hull stopcock and the toilet line stopcock. If you want fresh water in it, you close the through-hull stopcock and open the one from the sink drain to the toilet intake. You then fill the sink with sufficient fresh water to fill the hose from the T to the toilet (I even put some lemon juice in there to freshen things up without killing the aerobic bacteria in the tank) before you leave the boat, and then pump the toilet, which drains the sink. Once this is done, the line is filled with fresh water.

Simon

littlelizzy 09-20-2012 07:16 AM

Re: Pearson 31-2 fresh water head conversion
 
Thanks for the tips. I will make sure we have a backflow preventer in place!

eherlihy 09-20-2012 08:44 AM

Re: Pearson 31-2 fresh water head conversion
 
This is the way that a Vacuflush Head is plumbed. The Vacuflush system uses a lot less water, and it has a backflow preventer.
http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z...ps1341df7d.jpg

RichH 09-20-2012 11:40 AM

Re: Pearson 31-2 fresh water head conversion
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GaryHLucas (Post 920241)
I hope you realize that you now have what may be drinking water connected to a sewer line. On land that is illegal unless you have backflow prevention device. A house toilet does that by using a gravity tank. It would be bad to make someone sick on your boat.

ABSOLUTELY CORRECT ---- UNLAWFUL DANGEROUS POTABLE WATER CONNECTION TO 'SEWER SYSTEM'

Backflow preventers are 'iffy' to prevent retrograde bio-contamination from a sewerage system. You need an 'air gap' - similar to what you find in a toilet tank to prevent retrograde bio-contamination. In this application a backflow preventer MUST be certified (via 'sanitary codes' -- NSF or FDA, etc.) vs. retrograde bio-contamination.

Minnewaska 09-20-2012 01:11 PM

Re: Pearson 31-2 fresh water head conversion
 
Yea, I agree. Potentially nasty solution, but I thought I read that the supply tank was going to be dedicated to the toilets. That would be a very good idea.

Chlorine in the supply is a very bad idea. It kills all the good bacteria that keeps your holding tank from smelling and will ultimately rot ever metal, rubber or plastic part it comes in contact with.

Before we leave for an extended period, we fill the bowl with fresh water from the sink and flush it. That clears the waste line of any rotting seawater. We still have the problem of the seawater decomposing between the thru-hull and the head, but that less than a half gallon and easily flushed through when we return. We pop the hatch, put a few drops of Raritan CP in the bowl, fill and flush. Easy and right back to normal. We never notice the smell of seawater when aboard an using the system routinely.


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