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Outrageous 05-29-2013 05:10 PM

Accessing Chainplates
 
I have a 1982 Pearson 32 owned for 4 years. I'm doing other work that makes it reasonable to inspect the chainplates. How do I get at them? I don't want to take apart the cabin willy-nilly, so hoping someone with Pearson experience can advise.

knothead 05-29-2013 05:22 PM

Re: Accessing Chainplates
 
I can't remember off the top of my head how they did the chainplates in your boat. I know I've seen them, but I'm drawing a blank. Sorry.
If you don't get some feedback by tomorrow, I'll check the computer and look for one of my customers that has one and check it out. There may even be a Pearson hauled out in the yard next door.
I'll ask my business partner too. He may recall.

Alex W 05-29-2013 06:07 PM

Re: Accessing Chainplates
 
A Pearson 32 that I looked at (before buying my 28-2) had them buried in some cabinets. It didn't appear that they could be inspected without disassembling the cabinets. I actually walked away from the boat since I couldn't easily inspect them for leaks.

I thought that this was a custom feature on that specific boat, but maybe it is a general one?

Outrageous 05-30-2013 01:41 PM

Re: Accessing Chainplates
 
Alex,
I think hidden chainplates exist on several Pearson models, based on the few I've seen. My current guess is they're partly behind the wooden enclosure housing the cabin speakers, but there's 'stuff' sealing those to the surrounding fiberglass, as well as screws that look like they've never been turned. I could always experiment, but in the middle of sailing season there's this trade-off: Keep sailing and risk a problem - or open things up and risk losing the season...

Alex W 05-30-2013 01:56 PM

Re: Accessing Chainplates
 
Yes, that is where they appeared to be hidden on the one that I was looking at.

On my Pearson 28-2 (designed a decade later) the chainplates are out in the open and easy to inspect. I much prefer that.

knothead 05-30-2013 07:41 PM

Re: Accessing Chainplates
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Outrageous (Post 1037395)
Alex,
I think hidden chainplates exist on several Pearson models, based on the few I've seen. My current guess is they're partly behind the wooden enclosure housing the cabin speakers, but there's 'stuff' sealing those to the surrounding fiberglass, as well as screws that look like they've never been turned. I could always experiment, but in the middle of sailing season there's this trade-off: Keep sailing and risk a problem - or open things up and risk losing the season...

I consulted with my business partner and he confirms that the chainplates are behind the wood panels. It should be fairly simple to get at them.

Don't be afraid to dig into this sort of stuff on your boat. You need to become familiar enough with the boat so that you have the confidence to, at the very least, know what you are paying others to do for you should you choose that route.
If you see evidence of leaking, ie heavy rust stains, then you need to address it.
Remember, chainplates usually always break where they pass through the deck. Moisture is trapped in there and there is a lack of air circulation and the chainplates will develop cracks. Next thing you know. They break.
If you do see signs of corrosion and decide to pull the chainplates for a closer inspection. Replace them. And the bolts. Even if they look okay. It's not worth going to all that trouble and putting the old ones back in. New chainplates, especially stainless ones aren't that expensive.
Good luck
Steve

Outrageous 07-02-2013 01:34 PM

Re: Accessing Chainplates
 
Update: I unscrewed/removed the speakers [rather than the wood paneling] and found the main chainplates for my Pearson 32 Hull #113. There is another set forward, visible inside the bathroom sink cabinet and opposing closet side. They look OK to me, and the deck side seems sealed with silicone. I had the mast stepped 2 years ago along with some other work, and the reputable boat yard didn't propose replacing them. Since most car/boat shops take every opportunity to sell you more services, I'm taking that as a sign that they are OK, and will have them checked next year at a haul out.

Thanks for your help Knothead.


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