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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Provisioning
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  #11  
Old 11-13-2003
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Coffee

Here''s another way: SS or aluminum camp stove percolator. (Cabela''s or Target). Works great on stove.

For really different coffee, try the backpacker''s version.
Coffee pot on stove,
no parts inside (just water)
toss in ground coffee & boil
grounds fall to bottom - pour.

...Never would have believed it until I saw it. Good coffee too.
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  #12  
Old 11-15-2003
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Coffee

I use the french press also. I like it but I have a pressure alchohol stove and it takes forever just to boil water. I am considering one of those 12 volt automatic drip coffe makers that are sold at Boaters World (cigarette lighter plug). Has anyone tried one of these?
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Old 11-26-2003
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Coffee

The camping method works. We called it hobo coffee. helps too if you pour a little cold water aound on top...makes the grounds sink.

but no one has mentioned cold water drip, maybe b/c it should be refrigerated to keep for any significant length of time. folks love it for iced coffee, but i used it for years for hot.
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Old 11-27-2003
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Coffee

Coleman markets a drip coffeemaker just like the home electric units, but it sits on top of a propane stove burner. Works great at anchor, but not likely in a seaway.
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Old 11-27-2003
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Coffee

whats wrong with the stainless steel percolator pot from west marine?
eric
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Old 11-30-2003
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Coffee

Eric.....works great for me. If you like your coffee with less sediment you can even buy filters that will fit in the stainless basket. I like the way the coffee tastes with this method, just don''t over cook it. 5-7 minutes after it starts to perk is fine.
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Old 11-30-2003
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Coffee

forgot to mention that the italian expresso makers that Jeff H was talking about works great too. Just more of an expresso blend needed though.
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Old 01-06-2004
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Coffee

Last summer we got tons of advice on the lake ontario message board about brewing with a stainless perc. It is simple, relatively breakproof, and rinses clean.

1. Use good water. Bottled or filtered. Good water means good coffee.
2. Grind you own beans, and leave them rough ground. Grind it too fine and you''ll get grounds in your mug.
3. 1 spoon to 1 cup of water. (We use tablespoons, but we like strong coffee as well.)
4. Put on the burner until it starts to perc, then give it 6-8 minutes on LOW heat, (just enough to keep perking). High heat will burn the bottom.

It sounds more complicated than it is. (Like explaining sailing to a powerboater.) It does make great coffee, with only one item placed on a gimbaled stove, versus, the Frech press which can slide off the counter, or an electric device which robs your batteries.

Like sailing, skill makes it better.
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Old 01-31-2004
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Coffee

This is a great thread.
<P>For you purists, an electric percolator violates two of the most important coffee-making rules:<ol><li>Never keep heat on the bottom of the carafe.

<li>Don''t recirculate brewed coffee through the grounds.</ol>
Brewed coffee has a limited time window under heat (about 25 mins.) before a chemical change occurs that greatly diminishes its taste. We''ve all left the coffeemaker on noticed the "cooked" flavor that occurs with just the. That''s why your Thermos and air pots keep coffee hot and tasting fresh for hours. "Get that coffee off the heat!"<P>Coffee recirculated through the grounds will extract bitter acids that a "once through" process leaves in the grounds. Electric perc coffee often as a bitter "bite" that drip or infusion process avoids (but don''t leave that French press sit too long before pouring out).
Jeff''s espresso poured into a mug and then topped with hot water dilutes it down to "café Americain," and can certainly be made with something other than the traditional French roast.
On a boat, I like the convvenience of cone-shaped paper filters for drip coffee: all I have to do is boil water, then just toss the filters in the trash and haul to shore later, instead of using water to rinse spent grounds out of the pot and down the sink.
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Old 01-31-2004
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Coffee

Sorry for the sentence fragments: I posted when I wanted to edit.

The above applies to any type of percolation: electric or over-the-stove. The electrics are more insidious because typically the heat stays on longer...

Freshly ground beans do make better coffee. When beans are ground, the oils are exposed to air and begin to oxidize. After a while, the oil goes rancid. That''s why ground coffee goes stale after a while even in an air-tight container. Even the roasting process brings some oils to the surface (ever notice darkly ground beans are shinier?), but keeping roasted beans away from the air keeps them fresher longer than is possible for ground coffee. Freezing roasted beans is debated, but I think I notice they last longer.
Grinding as you go insures fresh coffee. And usually opens up many more choices for the budding coffee afficionado. I can''t even drink the supermarket stuff any more, I''m so spoiled by good coffee.
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