Spinnaker sheet barber haulers - SailNet Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 9 Old 09-06-2009 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Spinnaker sheet barber haulers

Hello,
I have,today, registered with sailnet in the hope that I can get a reasoned answer to a question regarding the use of a barber hauler on a spinnaker sheet when reaching.
I used one on my mini-tonner and I have seen them used during Cowes Week in the UK on quite big boats.
As usual it consist of a tailed block through which the spinnaker sheet passes. The function is two fold- to open the slot and, as the tail is adjusted by it being lead through a block fixed at gunwale level amidships, to prevent the sheet from pulling the stern down wind and causing a broach. The load is shared between the midships point and the after turning block.

Do any of the forum members regularly use such a hauler?

The benefits can be dramatic, I assure you!
Thanks for a reply.
Metch
metch is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 Old 09-07-2009
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,588
Thanks: 7
Thanked 25 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 16
 
In the US, only jib sheets have barber haulers, spinnaker sheet leads are controlled by tweaker blocks, for reasons other than the comments you have in mind. Does How Boat Things Work - Google Books refer to what you may have seen?
sailingfool is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 9 Old 09-07-2009
Senior Member
 
jackdale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 9,041
Thanks: 27
Thanked 59 Times in 56 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
The other term you might want search is "twing."

__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 9 Old 09-08-2009 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Spinnaker sheet twings.

Thank you both for your replies.
The link shows the twing as exactly what I have tried to describe. In use,on a broad to close reach the length of the twing line will enable you to adjust the position of the lee clew in any strength of wind and by experiment you will find that you can sail upwind of almost every boat NOT using a twing. In my mini-tonner I have sailed through the fleet in light airs as I only flew the spinnaker! Try it! AND you will never broach.

However I have never thought to use a barber hauler on a jib. How does that work? What is the function?In use does it not tend to throttle the slot?

Last edited by metch; 09-08-2009 at 05:25 AM. Reason: Added text.
metch is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 9 Old 09-08-2009
Senior Member
 
jackdale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 9,041
Thanks: 27
Thanked 59 Times in 56 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
The barber hauler is used to move the clew over the jib car. It is a slight adjustment and does not choke or throttle the slot.

__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 9 Old 09-08-2009
Badger Sailor
 
MSN2Travelers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 179
Thanks: 1
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Jib/Genoa Barber Hauler

I race on a Pearson Flyer. We have a single genoa track on the deck. We use a barber hauler to move the crew outboard of the Genoa car track. This helps open the slot when on a close reach in light air. Here is a general view of how it is rigged- Barber Haul We have a block on the toe rail that the line is routed through and then back to a winch on the deck.

Paul
`99 Beneteau Oceanis 352, #282 WiTCHCRAFT
Milwaukee, WI
Sailing Lake Michigan and the Great Lakes

Last edited by MSN2Travelers; 09-08-2009 at 12:00 PM.
MSN2Travelers is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 9 Old 09-08-2009
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,588
Thanks: 7
Thanked 25 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 16
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by metch View Post
.... In use,on a broad to close reach the length of the twing line will enable you to adjust the position of the lee clew in any strength of wind and by experiment you will find that you can sail upwind of almost every boat NOT using a twing. ..?
Actually the twing/tweaker is only used to improve the trimming angle on the afterguy, greatly reducing the load without the use of twin spinnaker sheets. You set only the windard tweaker, the leeward is left free. The clew should be left free to fly at the same height as the tack/pole. If you are laso trimming the leeward tweaker, you will end up with a strangely shaped spinnaker.
sailingfool is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 9 Old 09-08-2009
Senior Member
 
Gary M's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sarnia ON
Posts: 693
Thanks: 3
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
The tweakers are also very important in heavy air downwind sailing. By choking down on the guy and to some extent on the sheet, the chute will be pulled down which lowers it's centre of effort. This will greatly reduce the tendency to roll from side to side and therefore reduce the risk of broaching.

The other major use as I see it is to pull the guy down close to the rail so that on a reach the guy is not rubbing hard against the lifelines which does neither of them any good.

Gary
Gary M is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 9 Old 09-08-2009
Senior Member
 
paulk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: CT/ Long Island Sound
Posts: 2,609
Thanks: 4
Thanked 26 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 16
 
Solings used to frequently be rigged with twing lines on the spinnaker sheets. On bigger boats they're often helpful for retrieving the sheet on a takedown.
paulk is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Spinnaker Takedown Basics Dean Brenner Racing Articles 0 04-28-2002 08:00 PM
Spinnaker Fundamentals Steve Colgate Learning to Sail Articles 0 06-24-2000 08:00 PM
Spinnaker Fundamentals Steve Colgate Seamanship Articles 0 06-24-2000 08:00 PM
Spinnaker Fundamentals Steve Colgate Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 06-24-2000 08:00 PM
Spinnaker Fundamentals Steve Colgate Racing Articles 0 06-24-2000 08:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome