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post #11 of 116 Old 03-15-2010
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I would highly recommend buying a good vacuum insulated flask or thermos. Nissan stainless makes some good ones. Having hot coffee, tea or soup is a real godsend on a cold night watch.

Other gear you'll probably want for your racing kit:

A large mesh bag to store your stuff. [i]Lets the stuff dry and lets you see your gear, but keeps it organized and neat.

A good flashlight. I prefer the Gerber Firecracker, which uses a single AA and is nice and small, but doesn't have a red lens. Making one of red acetate is simple enough though. An LED headlamp is a good addition too, preferably with red LEDs.

A good rigging knife. I prefer the Boyes Cobalt Carbide ones, but they're a bit pricey if you're not able to hold on to them.

Your own harness and tether, preferably a harness integrated with a PFD. I prefer the Spinlock Deckware pro or Deckvest. While it isn't USCG approved, it is SOLAS approved, and has some features the other PFDs won't. It comes with an integrated harness that is easily adjustable. It comes with thigh-straps, which are more comfortable than crotch straps. It has a strobe, whistle, and spray hood built in. For tethers, I like the two-leg tethers, with a 3' and a 6' leg, preferably with shock corded legs.

A good hat. I prefer fleece, but old-fashioned wool watch caps work quite well too.

Good gloves. Cold fingers and hands suck. Thin neoprene gloves are about the best choice. Fairly warm, yet leave you enough dexterity for most tasks.

Good boots. Wet cold feet pretty much suck too. What boots you get depend on your budget and foot size. I prefer boots that fit tighter and give your feet more support. In really cold weather, I wear my technical ice climbing boots... feet are nice and warm and dry in them.

Fleece makes for good layers. They provide a lot of insulation, shed water well, dry quickly, and pack fairly small.

Good foul weather gear. Needs to have the high collar, a good hood, good double cuffs, big pockets and lots of retroreflective patches. Adding retroreflective tape to the wrists and to the toes of your shoes is a good idea. The wrists make your arms much more visible, especially if you fall overboard. The toes make it easier for you to see where you're placing your feet at night.

A microfiber towel. These are available at most camping gear stores, like REI/MEC. They absorb a lot of water and dry fairly fast and take up a lot less space than a traditional towel.

Anti-nausea meds. Bring whatever works for you. Different people need different meds...

An extra pair of glasses if you wear them or contacts Things get lost, broken or fall overboard.

Extra prescription meds if you taken any. Keep the two supplies separate.

Sailingdog

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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 03-15-2010 at 11:46 AM.
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post #12 of 116 Old 03-15-2010
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SD hit the nail on the head.

A dry bag is really nice. Doesn't have to be yachtie. The mesh bag is good if you don't have someplace to hang wet stuff, but hanging dries faster. Use some line or a cheap carabiner to attach it to the boat somewhere. Cargo likes to go flying in the night for some reason.

A snack. I like pop tarts. No need to heat them up, pre packaged, and LOADED with carbs. Like 400 calories per package. That's what you want on a long race, carbs can make up for a lack of sleep. You will have to sleep, but eating a lot of calories will give you energy to burn.

EAR PLUGS! I'm a light sleeper, if you only get 2-3 hours to sleep, better make sure you can fall assleep in 10 minutes flat.

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post #13 of 116 Old 03-15-2010
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post #14 of 116 Old 03-15-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zz4gta View Post
SD hit the nail on the head.

A dry bag is really nice. Doesn't have to be yachtie. The mesh bag is good if you don't have someplace to hang wet stuff, but hanging dries faster. Use some line or a cheap carabiner to attach it to the boat somewhere. Cargo likes to go flying in the night for some reason.

A snack. I like pop tarts. No need to heat them up, pre packaged, and LOADED with carbs. Like 400 calories per package. That's what you want on a long race, carbs can make up for a lack of sleep. You will have to sleep, but eating a lot of calories will give you energy to burn.

EAR PLUGS! I'm a light sleeper, if you only get 2-3 hours to sleep, better make sure you can fall assleep in 10 minutes flat.
I agree, these are all good suggestions. I carry a dry bag, but like having a mesh bag too for wet stuff... I also carry about 20-25' of small stuff with me as a general rule... never know when you'll need it.

Powerbars and Clif Bars are better than poptarts, but poptarts are much tastier.

Earplugs are key, especially if someone on the crew snores...

Sailingdog

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #15 of 116 Old 03-15-2010
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Earplugs and thermos are on my list for offshore students - should have used that list. Forget snoring - there is nothing as noisy as being in a cabin right below a winch.

One other suggestion.

A 500 ml (2cup) water bottle with a wide mouth.
  • Gatorade crystals - some skippers do not like bottled water on board. Gatorade or ice tea makes the tap water more palatable. (On the other hand some skippers drain the water tanks and carry only what is required.)

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post #16 of 116 Old 03-15-2010
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You've never heard me snore....
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Earplugs and thermos are on my list for offshore students - should have used that list. Forget snoring - there is nothing as noisy as being in a cabin right below a winch.

One other suggestion.

A 500 ml (2cup) water bottle with a wide mouth.
  • Gatorade crystals - some skippers do not like bottled water on board. Gatorade or ice tea makes the tap water more palatable. (On the other hand some skippers drain the water tanks and carry only what is required.)

Sailingdog

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Quote:
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Powerbars and Clif Bars are better than poptarts, but poptarts are much tastier.
yeah, I tried the power bars once. Only once, I can't digest what I can't choke down. do love the pop tarts...

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Quote:
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You've never heard me snore....
Now should I take that as an invitation?

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Some people's palates are more developed and civilized than yours apparently...
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Originally Posted by zz4gta View Post
yeah, I tried the power bars once. Only once, I can't digest what I can't choke down. do love the pop tarts...

Sailingdog

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #20 of 116 Old 03-16-2010
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Developed and civilized?

Power Bars completely and utterly suck. Like eating peanut butter flavored particle board. Nothing civilized about that at all...unless you're a beaver.

Put me in the "uncivilized" pop-tart bracket with ZZ. Clif Bars are pretty tasty too.

Have you guys tried these babies?


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