Reaching struts - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 17 Old 01-20-2004 Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 52
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Reaching struts

I know they''re for reaching, when the pole goes forward and the guy''s angle gets very small, but they seem to be used only in distance races and not buoy races. Is that correct? So are they a chafe and wear preventative rather than essential bits of gear? How should they''re length be determined, and are there any rules about their use? I seem to recall PHRF allowing them, but that some people quote an (old?) RRS rule prohibiting "outriggers".

Thanks,
-Chad
dpboatnut is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 Old 01-21-2004
Moderator
 
Jeff_H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 6,843
Thanks: 5
Thanked 138 Times in 111 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Reaching struts

I have not seen a reaching strut used on a race boat in more than 10 years. They do improve the lead angle for the spinacker guy when power reaching but that is less of a problem since most boats went to low stretch line. They may still be used on bigger boats on long offshore legs but I have not seen boats even equipped for struts in recent years. As far as I know, they are still completely legal.

Jeff
Jeff_H is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 17 Old 01-21-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: New England USA
Posts: 261
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 13
 
Reaching struts

The reaching strut should be used whenever your pole is forward enough that the guy would hit the shrouds. Close reaching with a chute, in otherwords. With the newer blends of lightweight high strength lines out today, you must make sure you use a strut to brevent break-down of the fibers from chafe on the shrouds. I use mine whenever the guy will be touching the uppers. Even on short distance or bouy racing. I need a full crew(7 - 8) on my older 37'' IOR boat, so it''s not a big deal. If you had fewer crew, the extra step might seem like too much work on a short course. Mine takes only a few seconds to put up and take down. Just remember those days when your guy was rubbing away on your shrouds if your heavily loaded guy parts with a bang.
Silmaril is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 17 Old 01-21-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: New England USA
Posts: 261
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 13
 
Reaching struts

As Jeff mentioned, it really is a throw back to the olds days, small high aspect mains and silly huge foretriangles. My 3/4 oz tri-radial is about 1,400sf and makes for a lot of work. Hense my need for a lot of crew when racing. I only singlehand a chute in VERY light winds! I would imagine if your guy doesnt hit your shrouds, it would be a waste of time. Mine does, so I use it!
Silmaril is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 17 Old 01-21-2004 Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 52
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Reaching struts

Thanks for the replies. My boat is an older CCA rule boat, with an 8'' beam on 29'' LOD, and only a 10'' J dim. The guy starts getting on the shrouds pretty quick as the boat reaches up. I''ve tried running the guy through a snatch block on the rail, but that doesn''t really solve the problem.

I''ve seen the photo of Stan Honey''s Cal40 crossing the finish line of the Transpac reprinted several times lately, and noticed he was sporting a strut. He also has an intersting "reverse twing" on the bottom of his boom, to hold the sheet further outboard. Since my boat has similar proportions to his (broadly...), I began to think his might be a good example to follow.

Oh, and just arrived in my mailbox, the cover on the current issue of Sail Mag has a Farr with a reaching strut, although I suppose Jeff might say any boat with teak decks is not a "raceboat". I think it''d still woop mine, though...

Best,
-Chad
dpboatnut is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 17 Old 02-04-2004
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,558
Thanks: 7
Thanked 24 Times in 24 Posts
Rep Power: 16
 
Reaching struts

I always thought the primary purpose of a strut was to ease the load on the guy by providing a wider-angle. I remember needing two-hands on a primary winch to trim a guy close-reaching in a breeze without a strut on even a C&C 33 - put the strut up and it was much more manageable.
I think the use of of tweaker blocks allowing trimming the guy to the rail amidship spelt the end of strut use on most boats by providing similar leverage without the extra hardware or running around...
sailingfool is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 17 Old 02-04-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: New England USA
Posts: 261
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 13
 
Reaching struts

It''s all in the angles. On my "vintage" IOR design, if you use a block out at the widest point of beam, you would not have a fair lead back to the footblock. The farthest forward I can have a guy with a fair lead to the footblock then puts the guy on the shrouds when the pole is just off the headstay. Therefore, I use a reaching strut.
Silmaril is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 17 Old 03-06-2013
Senior Member
 
Sabreman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Yeocomico River, VA
Posts: 1,643
Thanks: 3
Thanked 18 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 10
   
Re: Reaching struts

I know that this is an ancient thread, but I'd like to resurrect the discussion. Two questions:

1. When we have the symmetrical spinnaker flying on a reach, the pole is against or nearly against the headstay. In that position with the guy lead to the aft corner of the transom, it's nearly impossible to trim because the guy is pulling the pole nearly straight back, dragging across the lifelines, chafing both. Last year, we led the guy to a block amidships on the rail and the angle was better but not great. While a reaching strut is the obvious answer, what do you guys do?

2. I picked up a relatively short strut at Bacon's that I think will work. The traditional attachment point is on the mast, but I think that I recall seeing a photo of the strut attached to the point on the deck. Ideas? I was planning to attach it to a sliding eye fixed at the forward end of our inboard genoa track and then lashing the middle of the strut to a stanchion to keep it from riding up.

Sabre 38 "Victoria"
Sabreman is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 17 Old 03-06-2013
Senior Member
 
jackdale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 9,028
Thanks: 27
Thanked 59 Times in 56 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: Reaching struts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabreman View Post
I know that this is an ancient thread, but I'd like to resurrect the discussion. Two questions:

1. When we have the symmetrical spinnaker flying on a reach, the pole is against or nearly against the headstay. In that position with the guy lead to the aft corner of the transom, it's nearly impossible to trim because the guy is pulling the pole nearly straight back, dragging across the lifelines, chafing both. Last year, we led the guy to a block amidships on the rail and the angle was better but not great. While a reaching strut is the obvious answer, what do you guys do?
The guy should go through a block further forward.





[QUOTE]

__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of 17 Old 03-06-2013
Just another Moderator
 
Faster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 16,518
Thanks: 104
Thanked 309 Times in 299 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Re: Reaching struts

The guy lead block should be forward when reaching tight and the pole near the forestay.

With end-for-end twingers do a good job of that, obviously you don't want to be moving the block on every gybe.

With dip pole, and double sheets/guys the guys can be lead through a forward/midships block at all times. This also helps take some of the load off the foreguy as the pull is more downward.

Reaching struts seem to be fading.. definitely not worth the hassle of setting/removing for every gybe, or going through the hassle for a 30 minute leg. If should be long enough to extend beyond the shrouds from it's attachment point. I think and on-deck attachment point would not be 'in line' with the normal position of the guy. It's more of a chafe protection measure than a 'angle of effort' measure as the difference is only a few inches anyhow. A forward or twinged guy lead from the widest foward point usually avoids the grinding on the shrouds - though loads on the lifelines and stanchions can become a concern.

Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Faster is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome