Construction methods (and their trade offs) - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 355 Old 11-26-2015 Thread Starter
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Construction methods (and their trade offs)

Let's try this again. Leaving behind the crud that other threads have devolved into, let's actually talk about construction methods and design limitations. Try to keep it civil and non personal. Try not to brand bash. Try to realize that certain boats have to hit certain price points, but that doesn't mean they can't be seaworthy.

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post #2 of 355 Old 11-26-2015 Thread Starter
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Let's try this again. Leaving behind the crud that other threads have devolved into, let's actually talk about construction methods and design limitations. Try to keep it civil and non personal. Try not to brand bash. Try to realize that certain boats have to hit certain price points, but that doesn't mean they can't be seaworthy.
How about starting with hull to deck joints? What is optimal? How much weaker is an out turned flange? Is a shoebox better or worse?
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post #3 of 355 Old 11-26-2015
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Re: Construction methods (and their trade offs)

I'm here and listening.

Great idea for a thread.
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post #4 of 355 Old 11-26-2015 Thread Starter
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Re: Construction methods (and their trade offs)

Thanks. If this fails, it will prove people are really only interested in pissing at each other and not interested in the real design elements. I'd like to have an intelligent conversation about some of these design elements. Some of them are done to be 'good enough' and save costs, but I'd like some more info on the trade offs. Bob's book is great, but it's only one perspective, and approaches the question a bit differently.
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post #5 of 355 Old 11-26-2015
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Re: Construction methods (and their trade offs)

I'm certainly watching. And I'll state this: From everything I've seen, liners are not evil. In fact, I think they make a lot of sense from a structural perspective if done correctly. It's simply a more holistic approach to strength that's been a part of architecture for a very long time (skin and structure working together). There's absolutely no inherent reason it should be inferior to overly thick layups.

And as I've also said before, and I'll say it again: I think the real question that people should be focused on is that of longevity. If the used boat market's mentality is that 40 year old boats are the strongest - I think we're in for a world of hurt in a decade. We should have SOME kind of idea from ALL manufacturers what the "half life" of a new boat is in given conditions.
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post #6 of 355 Old 11-26-2015
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Re: Construction methods (and their trade offs)

I fear we don't have enough of the kind of experts we'd need for a good discussion on these topics, Sean.. but lets hope for some good dialogue.

One very amateur observation. On a variety of fronts I bemoan the disappearance of the once-deriguer 'slotted aluminum toe rail. It's convenience is obvious, and I recall seeing a video of an excavator trying to crush an old C&C for disposal. The rail's tenacity in holding the joint together under that attack was impressive. I can only believe that it also tremendously strengthened that whole structure as well.

Our friends currently cruising the Caribbean on a Bene 36.7 always comment that they wished that boat had such a rail, as ours does.

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post #7 of 355 Old 11-26-2015
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This is doomed to fail.

Every one will defend what they have as the best.

Very few people even know the difference between hull and deck joints or the advantages and disadvantages of stick built versus pan.

I really believe the best you can do is research the model and the maker of the boat you're interested in. Then decide if it fits your sailing plans.
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post #8 of 355 Old 11-27-2015 Thread Starter
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This is doomed to fail.

Every one will defend what they have as the best.

Very few people even know the difference between hull and deck joints or the advantages and disadvantages of stick built versus pan.

I really believe the best you can do is research the model and the maker of the boat you're interested in. Then decide if it fits your sailing plans.
I don't disagree, but enough of us got sick of the production boat thread that I hope we can do better here.
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post #9 of 355 Old 11-27-2015
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Re: Construction methods (and their trade offs)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shockwave View Post
This is doomed to fail.

Every one will defend what they have as the best.

Very few people even know the difference between hull and deck joints or the advantages and disadvantages of stick built versus pan.

I really believe the best you can do is research the model and the maker of the boat you're interested in. Then decide if it fits your sailing plans.
After 200 pages on the last one I thought the same thing, lets hope you are wrong too. But please take this in a positive light I think the premise of this thread is where it should be. I saw too many good questions asked in the other one with the flow only going in the same direction.
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post #10 of 355 Old 11-27-2015
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Re: Construction methods (and their trade offs)

I would like some insight on how my Boat is constructed. I have a CS 30 with a full liner, I think its one of the best built floors I have seen especially the mast step there has to be 5 or 6" of solid FG right there. It is part of the main grid then the liner sets on top of that as opposed to the grid and liner as one piece.
On these flat bottom designs how else are you going to get the strength needed in the bilge that you get with a deep keel and all those curved sections to add strength.
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