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  #1  
Old 02-07-2008
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Catalinia retrofit article?

Hi,

Hoping somewhere can help me out. There was a guy who retrofitted a Catalina to the point where it was strong enough for a circumnavigation. I was told he wrote up all the modifications he needed to make and I was wondering if anyone knows if that information is on the "net." Google and various sailing forums didn't turn anything up.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Mike
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Old 02-07-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueranger View Post
Hi,

Hoping somewhere can help me out. There was a guy who retrofitted a Catalina to the point where it was strong enough for a circumnavigation. I was told he wrote up all the modifications he needed to make and I was wondering if anyone knows if that information is on the "net." Google and various sailing forums didn't turn anything up.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Mike
Here are the instructions:

1) Clean & detail your boat
2) Find a good yacht broker
3) List your boat
4) Close the deal and sell current boat
5) Buy a proper blue water capable boat
6) Make your journey


Sorry to be so blunt but with the cost of materials and supplies these days converting a Catalina to be blue water capable will likely cost more than finding a boat that is already designed for this purpose.

P.S. Read the two articles in Soundings Magazine this month about small boats venturing into the ocean then let them sink in. Pay especially close attention to the part about the broken rudder on the Catalina 25 and the swamped outboard motor that put the other boat onto a jetty thus destroying it...
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Last edited by Maine Sail; 02-07-2008 at 09:02 AM.
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Old 02-07-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueranger View Post
Hi,

Hoping somewhere can help me out. There was a guy who retrofitted a Catalina to the point where it was strong enough for a circumnavigation. I was told he wrote up all the modifications he needed to make and I was wondering if anyone knows if that information is on the "net." Google and various sailing forums didn't turn anything up.
"Living Out a Dream" by Dave Martin in the Jan/Feb 2008 issue of Good Old Boat magazine (issue #40, pages 28-31)

"Living out a dream: Dave Martin tells of the work he did to make a Cal 25 seaworthy. Key words: designer Bill Lapworth, flush deck, gunwales, companionway, bulkheads, hard doghouse, took out the cockpit, added stringers, revised the V-berth. Youth and poverty turn a stock Cal 25 into a world cruiser"

Dave has had a series of articles published in Good Old Boat that might be of interest.
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Old 02-07-2008
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Best way for a Catlina to circumnavigate is with these guys help.
http://www.worldwideboatshipper.com/
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Old 02-07-2008
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Halekai, loved your answer.

Blunt and realistic is better when I ask for responses. It also confirmed that little vioce in the back of my head that I'm SUPPOSED to listen to. Just for clarification sake, I have no intentions of a circumnavigation or anything so lofty. Just jumping from island to island but with a couple unavoidable passages in the plan. I would just feel better in a sailboat that I know was capable of enduring such conditions.

I keep seeing contradictory advice. People overbuy big boats with capabilities for which they'll never need with a crowd saying the poor owner bought too much boat. And the other crowd seems to be saying "I wouldn't take a Catalina outside of my bathtub." So which is the most intelligent choice for someone like me, whose plan is departing Dana Point, CA, sailing down to Baja, and then crossing through the PC to island hop in the Atlantic?

I ran into this years ago after killing car #3. I decided it was time for a truck. I did my research, all the mags and "experts" said don't waste your money on 4wd, most people that get it never use it and all it does is waste fuel, add cost and maintenance and other really really bad things.

So I got a 2wd. And promptly got stuck multiple times. More often than not due to changing conditions, not so much going where a 2wd shouldn't have gone. Now I have a 4wd and haven't gotten stuck yet. The towing charges alone would have covered the cost of the 4wd.

This feels like the same kind of deal. I plan on avoiding the rough spots but weather happens. So for what I plan can I get by with a production Catalina with a few upgrades? Or do I need to go the bombproof route?

However I have very few nm's under my belt so I'll defer to those more experienced voices. Back to the search. Thank you for taking the time to help out!

Mike
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Old 02-07-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueranger View Post
Halekai, loved your answer.

Blunt and realistic is better when I ask for responses. It also confirmed that little vioce in the back of my head that I'm SUPPOSED to listen to. Just for clarification sake, I have no intentions of a circumnavigation or anything so lofty. Just jumping from island to island but with a couple unavoidable passages in the plan. I would just feel better in a sailboat that I know was capable of enduring such conditions.

I keep seeing contradictory advice. People overbuy big boats with capabilities for which they'll never need with a crowd saying the poor owner bought too much boat. And the other crowd seems to be saying "I wouldn't take a Catalina outside of my bathtub." So which is the most intelligent choice for someone like me, whose plan is departing Dana Point, CA, sailing down to Baja, and then crossing through the PC to island hop in the Atlantic?

I ran into this years ago after killing car #3. I decided it was time for a truck. I did my research, all the mags and "experts" said don't waste your money on 4wd, most people that get it never use it and all it does is waste fuel, add cost and maintenance and other really really bad things.

So I got a 2wd. And promptly got stuck multiple times. More often than not due to changing conditions, not so much going where a 2wd shouldn't have gone. Now I have a 4wd and haven't gotten stuck yet. The towing charges alone would have covered the cost of the 4wd.

This feels like the same kind of deal. I plan on avoiding the rough spots but weather happens. So for what I plan can I get by with a production Catalina with a few upgrades? Or do I need to go the bombproof route?

However I have very few nm's under my belt so I'll defer to those more experienced voices. Back to the search. Thank you for taking the time to help out!

Mike
Mike, depending on the model, you will be absolutely fine. Which model?

- CD
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Old 02-07-2008
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Mike...I am a fan of the C30...but it really is marginal for what you want to do. I don't think you need a "bluewater" boat (though that would be best) to succeed in your plans but I'd like to see you in somthing built a bit more robustly than the Cat30 as there will be lot of beating to windward in 8ft seas as normal weather on your proposed route. Check the bluewater boats sticky at the top of the boat buying forum.
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It’s interesting to hear some of the comments regarding Catalinas and their capability offshore. They may not be the “best” but certainly are capable. Just a few accomplishments.

“Juggernaut”Catalina 27
Left Miami and then to the Bahamas, St. Thomas then south for the Panama Canal. Peoceeding on to Pacific, Galapagos and then to French Polynesia and then 3000 miles away to Australia. From Darwin, Australia, headed westward on a nonstop, 6400-mile, 53-day passage. After crossing the gale ravaged Indian Ocean, arrived in Durban, South Africa. After rounding Cape Agulhas and Cape of Good Hope, headed for St. Thomas. Three-year, single-handed, world sailing adventure.

“Figment II” Catalina 320
Over a period of 3 years, sailed the stormy North Sea. There were two passages from Ramsgate, England to Oslo, Norway and return – 1300 miles each. One from Dover, England to Oslo and return – 1300 miles, and one from Southhampton to Oslo – 1600 miles. Participated in the grueling, 605-mile Fastnet Race from Cowes to Plymouth via Fastnet Rock and faced 20 hours of the North Sea,
force-eight gale winds and 20-foot seas.

“Moonrise” Catalina 36
Completed 8000 miles that began in Seattle. Sailed north to Glacier Bay, Alaska, then turning south, cruised down the west coast of North America, Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama and through the Panama Canal to the San Blas Islands and Cartegena, Columbia. Then headed for Jamaica, Dominican Republic and east to Puerto Rico, St. Croix, then down the island chain as far as St. Martin. Then headed northeast into the Atlantic and the long 2000-mile ocean passage to the Azores.

“Our Journey”Catalina 36
Left Los Angeles for Cabo San Lucas. Then on to La Paz, Isla Espirtu Santo, Mazatlan, San Blas and Puerta Vallarta. Left Puerta Vallarta for Hiva Oa, Marquesas in French Polynesia. The crossing took 25 days with winds averaging 20–25 knots. After the Marquesas, sailed for Tuamota Archipelago then to Tahiti and Moorea, returning to Tahiti.

“Alaskan Poor Boy”Catalina 36
From Alaska to Zihuatanejo, Mexico up to Puerto Vallerta, then west to the Marquesas Islands, to Tahiti, then Bora Bora, west once again to New Caledonia, south to Aukland, New Zealand, and back to Tahiti. From Tahiti to the Hawaiian Islands and on to Port Hardy, B.C. back to Seward Alaska. The next leg was to San Francisco then San Diego, south to La Paz and Labo San Carlos, Mexico. From there to Costa Rica, through the Panama Canal and north to Cancun. Then sailed to Key West, Ft. Lauderdale then up the Intercoastal Waterway to Annapolis Maryland.

“Sunseeker IV”Catalina 400
From Tampa sailed for the Florida Keys, then to the Bahamas, the Turks and Caicos, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Then down the island chain from St. Kitts to Guadeloupe, Dominica, Martinique, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and through the Grenadines. Continuing south, stops in Venezuela, Bonair, Curacao, Aruba. Next, Jamaica, the Cayman Islands and a tour of Mexico beginning with Isla Mujeras and ending with Xcalak and finally San Pedro and Placentia, Belize and back to Key West.

“Suzanne”Catalina 42
Departed Marina Del Rey, California bound for the Virgin Islands. Sailed south along the Pacific coast of Mexico to Cabo San Lucas, then over to Puerto Vallarta and down the coast to Puerto Madero – continuing south to Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama and through the Panama Canal to the San Blas Islands and Cartagena Columbia – then turning north to Boca Chica, Dominican Republic and finally east to St. Thomas. The total distance covered was 5000 miles in just over 7 months.

“Toroa” Catalina 42 mkII
Started in Los Angeles and to Sydney, Australia. Arrived at Huku Hiva in the French Marquesas after a twenty-three day passage. Sailing southwest, on to Papeete/Tahiti via Manihi Atoll. On to Moorea Island and eventually to Auckland, New Zealand. From Auckland to Fiji and the Vanatu Islands, and New Caledonia, back to New Zealand and eventually to Sydney, Australia.

“Salacia”Catalina 42 mkII
California to Mexico and then across the Pacific to New Zealand and finally Australia.

“C’est La Vie” Catalina 470
Sailed from California to Mexico and a year and half cruising the Sea of Cortez and the Pacific Coast of Mexico before leaving for the South Pacific from Puerto Vallarta. After an 18 day passage to the Marquesas, cruised to Tahiti and the Society Islands and now in Auckland.

“Anja K” Catalina 42
Traveled up the East Coast of Australia to Timor and via the Indonesian Archipelago. After visiting Singapore, Phuket, the islands and hongs of Phang Nga Bay, crossed to Sri Lanka. Sailing through the Red Sea on to Israel, Cyprus and along southern coast of Turkey. Next to the Greek Isles, Corinthian Canal, Corfu, Italy, Corsica, the Balearics and Spain before resting up in Gibraltar. Crossing to the Canaries and returned to Adelaide.

“Charmed Life” Catalina 470
2005 transpac doublehandled womens entry.
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Old 02-07-2008
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Our commodore makes that run every year (I think he is there right now, as a matter of fact) in a Catalina 400. The only difference is that he sails out of San Francisco if I am not mistaken... so a but furhter north. I know many of catalinas run down that coast to the baja.

I have not owned a C30. I have owned a 320. That would not be my first choice because of the layout and tankage. I would take a 36 up (esp the 36). The 380 is a fairly heavy boat and would do well also. 400+ is no problem.

Rick LaPaz does that run a lot, IIRC. He frequents here. Ask him his opinions too.

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Old 02-07-2008
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Slip- I noticed you did list the guy that failed in his crossing from San Diego to Catalina, lost his mast and got resuced a couple weeks later. ????
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