Life span of a boat??????????? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sailboat Design and Construction
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 03-05-2008
T37Chef's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,158
Thanks: 65
Thanked 28 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 8
T37Chef will become famous soon enough
Life span of a boat???????????

I know I am going to get raked over the coals, but the wine tasted good tonight

So I know this is an unanswerable question...or not? Just how long do we expect these things called boats to last??????

Something we have debated until we're sick to our stomach's, the debate over cored vs. solid and/or what is suitable core material.

My 1982 Tartan 37C has some balsa coring below the waterline, its going on 29 years old, and still there is no indication the hull is not seaworthy, or indication of it being wet. So then why is balsa not a acceptable choice for a core material???? There is NO question there are benefits to a lighter hull, and some may say stiffer as well when using balsa or something else. She could last another year or two, or maaaaaaaaybe another 10, 20, or 30?.

So does anyone really know how long it would last (assume its properly cared for)? NO, but quick to make a determination about what is acceptable and what isn't, based on what???

BTW, I understand that one reason is the difficulty of repairing a cored hull.

I believe there are probably hundreds, thousands, of wooden boats in the world still afloat, the USS Constellation berthed here in Baltimore, was built in 1854? (Yes, a LOT of restoration has been done, but the boat is over 150 years old ) So then why is a balsa not an acceptable choice for a core material?

Using the core debate as an example...what are your expectations for your boat. Me, I'd feel good if she lasted another 20 years...but

I guess I felt like stirring the soup tonight

Last edited by T37Chef; 03-06-2008 at 12:46 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 03-05-2008
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,447
Thanks: 6
Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by T37Chef View Post
I....
So then why is balsa not a acceptable choice for a core material???? ...
If your question begs a serious answer, the best location I know of adressing this question is Boat Hulls - Cores and Structural Issues: Online Articles by David Pascoe, Marine Surveyor

The way I look at this, is if you don't have a cored hull, then you don't need to worry your number will come up and you'll be one of the growning number of boat owners who have paid $3-400/ft to replace all the core in their hulls. Leaves plenty of other things to worry about.

PS. That said, the Tartan 37 is a truly lovely boat, and the boat that almost made me make an exception to avoiding cored hulls during my lasy boat search, and I can easily understand how the pleasures of such a nice boat can justify accepting a little more risk...
__________________
Certified...in several regards...

Last edited by sailingfool; 03-06-2008 at 09:01 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 03-06-2008
Sea Slacker
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,789
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
brak is on a distinguished road
It is great to hear that your Tartan is in a good shape. However, in my previous boat searches I found numerous Tartans with cored hulls for sale at very low prices. In all cases I found significant water intrusion in the hull, almost everywhere under waterline (and often - above). This does not mean the boat will fall apart under regular conditions - after all just the external FRP skin is probably strong enough to act as a hull for a while. But in any collision this will probably be very detrimental to boat survival. They are cheap for a reason.

That said, I will pass here an apocryphal story from a surveyor. A few years ago he surveyed a Tartan for a guy, and found her to be pretty well waterlogged and, in his opinion, basically junked. He was diplomatic in telling this but explained the situation. The guy said he'll think about it. He met that guy a number of years later and asked him how the deal went. Turned out deal went great, the guy bought the boat real cheap and sailed her down to Venezuela. Down there he had a problem with an engine so he left here there and came back.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 03-06-2008
T37Chef's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,158
Thanks: 65
Thanked 28 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 8
T37Chef will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingfool View Post
If your question begs a serious answer, the best location I know of adressing this question is Boat Hulls - Cores and Structural Issues: Online Articles by David Pascoe, Marine Surveyor
Read all that Pascoe stuff, among others when I discovered blisters and freaked out
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 03-06-2008
Gryzio's Avatar
Spam, Food of the Seagods
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 212
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Gryzio is on a distinguished road
Question Debatable

I could say one thing and someone else say different.

But!!!!! Ha! I know Wood is proven, it proved itself for Centuries. I guess Fiberglass have a foot hold.

I remember when I bought my one and only Harley Davidson Motorcycle. 1983 New!!! I was at a gas station and an Ego Dude (I guess Jealous) mention in front of the women how a Harley leak oil and Blah Blah. OK, I had a Kawasaki Trail Bike it not like I buy for ego!

Feeling sorry for the guy, and trying to offer good advice from experience. I tell him; "A Harley is like a good woman. You not take care of her you lose her to a man who will".

Fiberglass probably be here after Friday 13, 2029 when we all die.
Friday the 13th, 2029

But, in my heart ................. Wood be here forever!!!!!

Now, I will warn you 1957 may be young for wood. But, many men will not care for that woman. I WILL!!!!!!! This a good example of a good woman, she not "old", she just good!
Boats for Sale

But, I guess like the biker I mentioned, we all have our opinions. I respect that.

I hope the links work.
__________________
All the rivers run into the sea, yet the sea is not full.
Ecclesiastes, 1:7
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by Gryzio; 03-06-2008 at 12:14 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 03-06-2008
T37Chef's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,158
Thanks: 65
Thanked 28 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 8
T37Chef will become famous soon enough
I don't really expect my boat to last another 20 years, which is really what I am getting at.

If I purchased a new boat today, say a Hallberg Rassy ( I wish), for the price tag, is the expectation, properly cared for of course, it would still be structurally sound for my grandchildren's children? 100 years, 200, 75
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 03-06-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Posts: 190
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Lion35 is on a distinguished road
Well... the beer is good tonight here in CA (usually is) so I'll bite (and probably regret it).

Of the many, many, many wood boats built through the eons, a few very lucky and well built boats are still floating. Badly designed or built wood boats are gone and unfortunately many well built but unlucky wood boats are gone too.

The bottom line is carvel hulls are designed to be wet, cored hulls are designed to be dry and its only a matter of time until they get wet. Not to say it could be 30 years from now but eventually they get wet.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 03-06-2008
Plumper's Avatar
Sailor
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 845
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Plumper is on a distinguished road
The first fiberglass production boats in Canada (Shark 24) are still going strong. They started making them in about 1959. I race an old one (not sure how old) every weekend. It will outlast me, I'm sure.
__________________
There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar IV, iii, 217
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 03-06-2008
Gryzio's Avatar
Spam, Food of the Seagods
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 212
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Gryzio is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by T37Chef View Post
I don't really expect my boat to last another 20 years, which is really what I am getting at.
Ahh! The truth comes out!

Heck, I not know how old you are. I am 35 and been 35 for 15 years. Your boat be here longer than I will. Now, length of time may be different.

It like I said about the Harley. I sold mine to my Nephew. He paint and it really look good how he changed the Bike. Never had more than an Oil and Filter change.

Take care of it or not. Just some simple TLC go a long way it Life.

Listen, now this Motor Boats. But, I have seen then mounted wrong and the owner do "Not" until the transom rot out. It the same with Sailboats!

I fixing to buy a sailboat. Retractable Keel. As far as fiberglass and all, hey it look good. Some "Normal Cracks" in Gel Coat (1978) they could been prevented.

But, the main is the Keel! Now, had I bought the boat early in it's life. I promise!!!!!!!!!!!! That Keel be good as new. But, sadly, now! I can fix her.

I get a good deal at the expense of a person that not do simple TLC. Oh, I will pill the Keel. But, that a hobby to me at the lose of Blah, Blah.

Your boat, with care, in my opinion, be here until you give it away (Maybe in your 'Will').
__________________
All the rivers run into the sea, yet the sea is not full.
Ecclesiastes, 1:7
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 03-06-2008
T37Chef's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,158
Thanks: 65
Thanked 28 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 8
T37Chef will become famous soon enough
Gryzio...I hear the Hawaiians are nuts for Spam, so Anthony Bourdain said, you know of any proof of this
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What can you tell from the numbers? brazilnut Boat Review and Purchase Forum 10 07-01-2009 04:09 PM
Confessions of a bottom feeder PracticalSailor Gear and Maintenance Articles 9 06-18-2008 04:33 PM
Life in the fast lane, well for one day at least... Lancer28 Learning to Sail 8 11-27-2007 10:36 PM
buying first boat jerrycooper14 Boat Review and Purchase Forum 21 04-23-2002 02:15 PM
The Balance of Hull and Sails Steve Colgate Seamanship Articles 0 05-25-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:21 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.