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  #11  
Old 07-07-2008
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As usual, Jeff brings up some good points. Given the level of restoration needed for this boat it would be unconscionable to not make a thorough examination of the entire hull and superstructure and reinforce those points that Jeff points out as well as any others showing evidence of stress. It will be much easier to do while you're in "fiberglas mode" than doing so later and you'll be naturally inclined to do a better more thorough job.
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  #12  
Old 07-07-2008
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Sailaway's point is a good one... if you're going to be fiberglassing...you might as well do all of the reinforcing that you have to do all at once.
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  #13  
Old 07-07-2008
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I had a Venture 22 and really like the boat. While not an offshore boat by any means it is a good little boat and sails well. A lot of fun. I also found mine rotting in a yard and restored her. No hull work but had to replace the keel winch and all interior bulkheads needed replacing.

Get a copy of Don Casey's "This Old Boat". Packed with practical information on every aspect of your project. I refer to it often.
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Just a thought on your fiberglass repair. Your boat was built using an ester resin so I would not go to the expense of an epoxy resin ( for a number of reasons). One would be that if the repair is thicker than the original hull and with a different material it will cause a rigid hard spot in the hull and new cracks will form around it causing more problems later. Polyester resin will be cheap and is easy to work with. There are countless books and videos out on how to fiberglass repair. Your best secret tool is to get a resin roller from the supplier. It will work out excess resin and make the repair a much higher quality. There is too much to list any more. In short it may not be pretty but it's under the water line.
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I wouldn't use a polyester or vinylester reson for a STRUCTURAL REPAIR. The secondary bonding (adhesive) characteristics of polyester and vinylester resins basically suck compared to epoxy resins.

This is especially true if the boat you're going to be repairing is older, since the older the boat, the longer the laminate has had to cure and the fewer styrene bonding sites will be available for the polyester/vinylester resins to bind to. Using a polyester/vinylester resin on this type of repair is a pretty good way to guarantee you're be fixing it again, since it won't bond strongly enough to create a lasting repair.

BTW, epoxy resins, depending on their formulation, aren't necessarily any harder than polyester/vinylester resins and most structural repairs are done with epoxy from what I've seen.

IMHO, your advice is pretty much off the mark and I think you should probably do a bit more research on Epoxy, Polyester and vinylester resins with regards to STRUCTURAL repairs.

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Originally Posted by funsailthekeys View Post
Just a thought on your fiberglass repair. Your boat was built using an ester resin so I would not go to the expense of an epoxy resin ( for a number of reasons). One would be that if the repair is thicker than the original hull and with a different material it will cause a rigid hard spot in the hull and new cracks will form around it causing more problems later. Polyester resin will be cheap and is easy to work with. There are countless books and videos out on how to fiberglass repair. Your best secret tool is to get a resin roller from the supplier. It will work out excess resin and make the repair a much higher quality. There is too much to list any more. In short it may not be pretty but it's under the water line.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #16  
Old 07-07-2008
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SD is right, epoxy has enormous advantages in terms of penetratring and peel strength properties relative to either polyester or vinylester. Epoxy is the only way to go when you are dealing with structural secondary bonds. Any increased stiffness from the repair should be mitagated by tappering the edge of the new laminate where it joins the existing work.

Jeff
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From the reading I did I was under the impression that for all practical purposes polyester resin has pretty much been eclipsed for boat building/repair purposes by epoxy due to it's superior strength and adhesion to differing materials. Poly is slightly cheaper but unless you're mass producing not enough to make a significant difference. Just my 2 cents.

Mike
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Polyester resin is still used by a majority of the boat builders, primarily due to cost issues. There are also some complexities to using epoxy in boat-sized projects, like the need for a curing oven to ensure proper curing of all of the epoxy resin, that have also deterred some manufacturers from moving over to epoxies.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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I would'nt worry about it......It'll buff right out...........
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Old 07-08-2008
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repair issues to polyester boats

Actually I have a bachelors degree in Marine Technologies and am certified in several areas of fiberglass repair including cobalt fiberglass repair. So with an engineering degree in this stuff as well as using it for 20 years I 'm pretty confident it would be a one time fix. Also the West system is for people that can't measure proportions correctly. For those of you that don't know, Cobalt fiber glassing is a 4 part mixture.

Last edited by funsailthekeys; 07-08-2008 at 07:54 AM. Reason: addition
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