routing outhaul and topping lift - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 16 Old 07-20-2008 Thread Starter
Member
 
terryjoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington
Posts: 30
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
routing outhaul and topping lift

My boat (1975 Irwin 33 st sloop Mk2) currently has it's outhaul and topping lift mounted on the port side of the boom. My question is: Is it possible to somehow manage to redesign this so the controls can be routed to the cockpit or am I stuck with going up on deck to make these adjustments?

Thanks for your input!

Terryjoe
Pacific NW
1975 Irwin 33
terryjoe is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 07-20-2008
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Yes, you should be able to re-design the system so that you can run the outhaul and topping lift to the cockpit. Do you have photos of the current system, since that would make it far easier to understand what you've got to deal with to begin with, and how it needs to be modified. BTW, most outhauls have an internal block and tackle in the boom, which can often be removed if you're leading the lines aft to a winch.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 16 Old 07-21-2008
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Hull, United Kingdom
Posts: 62
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Yes, you will need blocks to route the ropes back to the cockpit to an appropriate cleat or clutch. Without photos we can't help you route them, its best to get a sheet of paper, draw out your existing layout and then plan the route, making sure that it won't cause future problems.
RichP is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 16 Old 07-21-2008
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,591
Thanks: 7
Thanked 25 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 16
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by terryjoe View Post
My boat (1975 Irwin 33 st sloop Mk2) currently has it's outhaul and topping lift mounted on the port side of the boom. My question is: Is it possible to somehow manage to redesign this so the controls can be routed to the cockpit or am I stuck with going up on deck to make these adjustments?

Thanks for your input!
Just curious, why bother to make these changes? Many topping lifts can be set so they don't need to be adjusted at all. At worst both topping lift and outhaul only need adjustment heading out and shutting down. Even a serious racer typically only adjusts the outhaul on different legs...a little overkill here?

Certified...in several regards...
sailingfool is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 16 Old 07-22-2008
Once known as Hartley18
 
Classic30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,859
Thanks: 46
Thanked 65 Times in 65 Posts
Rep Power: 10
   
Dock
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingfool View Post
Just curious, why bother to make these changes? Many topping lifts can be set so they don't need to be adjusted at all. At worst both topping lift and outhaul only need adjustment heading out and shutting down. Even a serious racer typically only adjusts the outhaul on different legs...a little overkill here?
SF, that's a good point, but..

Depending on the set-up, it's kinda handy to be able to adjust the outhaul from the cockpit.. you don't need to send anyone to the mast when it's rough and blowing a full gale just to stop the boom falling into the cockpit when reefing.

-
"Honestly, I don't know why seamen persist in getting wrecked in some of the outlandish places they do, when they can do it in a nice place like Fiji." -- John Caldwell, "Desperate Voyage"
Classic30 is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 16 Old 07-22-2008
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
It's more handy to be able to adjust the topping lift from the cockpit, since that's what holds the boom up.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartley18 View Post
SF, that's a good point, but..

Depending on the set-up, it's kinda handy to be able to adjust the outhaul from the cockpit.. you don't need to send anyone to the mast when it's rough and blowing a full gale just to stop the boom falling into the cockpit when reefing.
Besides, if you've got the main halyard, topping lift and reefing lines all led back to the cockpit, it is a bit silly not to have the outhaul lead aft too, since when you're raising or lowering the main, you generally want to adjust the outhaul.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 16 Old 07-22-2008
Senior Member
 
chucklesR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Pasadena Md - Magothy side
Posts: 5,979
Thanks: 10
Thanked 31 Times in 31 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Is not an outhaul, and even a topping lift that is on the boom reachable from the cockpit already?
Not trying to be too obtuse, but seems to me the reason they call it a boom is it is eminently reachable from the cockpit by hands if not heads.

I'm no racer, so for me I set the outhaul about once per season - mid line on tension. Topping lift I adjust on raising and lowering the main only - and mine is right there next to the main halyard on the mast.
chucklesR is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 16 Old 07-22-2008
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Chuckles-

You should probably ease the outhaul when you're have the main sail down, since it may stretch out the foot of the sail a bit otherwise.

You generally need to tension the outhaul more if you're sailing in heavier winds, ease it a bit when sailing in lighter winds. Tensioning the outhaul makes the sail flatter...easing it gives the sail a bit more power by making it fuller.

One of the main reasons I led my outhaul aft was to have better control over the main sail's shape. I regularly sail in SCA type weather, and being able to flatten the main helps a lot. Also, the two-to-one tackle in the boom really didn't give me enough leverage on the outhaul... now I have an ST40 winch to use. Much easier to adjust the tension.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 07-22-2008 at 08:24 AM.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 16 Old 07-22-2008
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,591
Thanks: 7
Thanked 25 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 16
 
FWIW I set my topping lift at the beginning of the season by ensuring a little slack when the main is trimmed close-hauled, then forget about it until time to remove the boom at the end of the season...
I guess if your boom droops over the cockpit when closehauled so there is no headroom you may want to tension the topping lift after dropping the main...but I bet many people release and tension the topping lift each time out without thinking about what they are doing.

Certified...in several regards...
sailingfool is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of 16 Old 07-22-2008
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Sailingfool-

I generally ease the topping lift when sailing since the mainsail on my boat has a fairly large roach and battens. I will tension it to support the boom when I'm raising, lowering or reefing the main, and then ease it again afterwards. I wish I could just leave it at one setting, but that isn't an option really.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Windward performance deseely General Discussion (sailing related) 21 04-01-2012 02:42 PM
Updating my mainsail reefing rigging lharmon Gear & Maintenance 11 01-19-2008 08:45 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome