mainsail boom control running rigging - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 09-28-2008
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mainsail boom control running rigging

I looked at a boat today that had a triangular type mainsail boom sheet rigging. There was a block at the rear starboard side of the cockpit, an block at the end of the mainsail boom, and a block and cam cleat at the port side of the cockpit at the rear. What is this called and how does it work? I didn't see the boat rigged so I don't know what it really looks like.

Thanks, Eric
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Old 09-28-2008
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That type of mainsheet is pretty common on smaller tiller-steered boats with a transom-hung rudder, since it keeps the mainsheet clear of the tiller.

What kind of boat was it.
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A DS 20. It was a transom hung tiller. How does it work? I didn't see it rigged.
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It sounds similar to mine which I've attempted to describe in the attached drawing. On mine, there's a triple block attached to the boom and a fiddle block with a cam cleat on either side. The line goes from one of the fiddle blocks, through the block on the boom to the fiddle block on other side, then back up to the boom, then to the opposite side etc,etc. Ultimately, you get a lot of purchase and the ability to trim from either side. There are also a couple of downsides in my opinion. None are the end of the world, but are opportunities for improvement. Because there is no control of the line as it passes through the triple block, you can never the the boom to centerline when close hauled. You can pull it down, but not uphill. Because of the round trip between all those blocks, there is a lot of sheet in play. I think mine is around 85' in all. That makes for a lot of friction and it takes either a lot of wind, or a lot of pushing on the boom to get it to go all the way out. This is at least partially because the sheet crosses itself a few times on the way to and from that triple block. Lastly, you can end up with the entire sheet on one side and find yourself on the other side with no sheet to ease. Again, not the end of the world, but I'm thinking there's got to be a better way. I'm considering replacing it with a traveler...........
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Old 09-29-2008
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Thanks. That makes sense. I only saw one cam cleat on the port side. This means I missed it on the starboard side, or it's missing.

So now you have two main sheets to deal with. So you could have different sail trims for the port tack and the starboard tack technically?

If you went with a traveler, where would you mount it? If you have a tiller in the way, the only place would be on the bridgedeck. I have seen them mounted there before. Is that a practicle place for a traveler, because that is exactly what I was thinking too.

Eric
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Allthumbs-

On many non-racing boats, the mainsheet isn't double-ended and will only have a camcleat on ONE side.

On a boat with a transom hung rudder and tiller, you generally can't have a traveler for the mainsheet, since any mainsheet with a single attachment point that is end-boom attached would interfere with your ability to steer with the tiller. If you modified the boat to mid-boom sheeting, which usually requires beefing up the boom to handle the loads or it will snap, you could probably mount a traveler on the bridgedeck or cabintop.
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Last edited by sailingdog; 09-29-2008 at 06:41 AM.
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Yeah, I was thinking midboom sheeting. Some of the later versions of the boat in questions do have this with the traveler mounted on the bridge deck. I guess I could find out if thier booms are bigger.

I am still not sure how this one would be rigged with only one end to pull on in this arrangement to get the boom to flop back and forth when tacking.

Eric


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Allthumbs-

On many non-racing boats, the mainsheet isn't double-ended and will only have a camcleat on ONE side.

On a boat with a transom hung rudder and tiller, you generally can't have a traveler for the mainsheet, since any mainsheet with a single attachment point that is end-boom attached would interfere with your ability to steer with the tiller. If you modified the boat to mid-boom sheeting, which usually requires beefing up the boom to handle the loads or it will snap, you could probably mount a traveler on the bridgedeck or cabintop.
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Allthumbs-

It would work just like what QS192 drew, but one of the othermost bottom blocks with camcleats is a padeye instead, and it only adjusts from one side. The actual functionality is no different. It is a bit harder to use, since it will be on the high-side on one tack and the low side on the other...but still should work just fine.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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I think mine originally had just one side with a cam cleat and the previous owner swapped out the fiddle block. It would be simple enough to do if you wanted cleating on both sides. If each side were independent, I'd be able to have different settings for each tack, but it's not possible the way it is now. I don't have the issue with the tiller; mine is inboard of the sheeting.
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Oh, I see it now. The trippleblock and boom just slide thru the sheets side to side until it's all tight. makes perfect sense all of a sudden.

Thanks.
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