A boat designed for ease of maintenance - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sailboat Design and Construction
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 10-12-2008
davidpm's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Madison
Posts: 3,703
Thanks: 166
Thanked 40 Times in 33 Posts
Rep Power: 7
davidpm is on a distinguished road
A boat designed for ease of maintenance

I've spent a lot of time prowling in around under sail boats the last few weeks. Each builder seems to have a focus.
Hunter = Affordable, new looks new designs
Catalina = Affordable, little more traditional
Caliber = off-shore, solid
Island Packet = Beautiful solid.
MacGregor = cheap, fun, just get on the water.

And on and on through each builder.
The one item I don't think I saw on any boat was a serious design for easy of maintenance. Yes Sabre had some nice maintenance ideas as did several other builders but not one of them did what I have in mind.

I would love to see a boat where the whole interior is bolt in and bolt out.
Every mechanical, wire, pipe etc is accessible with less than 30 minutes with a power tool of choice and just as easy to but back in.

I know the modern designs are using the interior for strewn. But frankly a significant part of the cost and worry about boats is about stuff you can't see or is too hard to fit into.

Has anyone seen any boat designed for easy maintenance? Any mods you did to make access easier?











What if a boat was designed for ease of maintenance.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 10-12-2008
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
The Hans Christian Explorer was designed as a collaboration between Chuc Paine and Nigel Calder and I think it is perhaps the closest thing I have seen to a boat designed for low maintenance, easy access and top notch system standards.
Hans Christian Explorer Yachts
I think they only built a few as it was quite expensive and a complete departure from the usual HC fare and financial problems with the company existed. Nevertheless and outstanding world cruising design.
__________________
No longer posting. Reach me by PM!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 10-12-2008
Delirious's Avatar
Pearson 31-2 #80 ('87)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 374
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 13
Delirious is on a distinguished road
1983 Sabre 34. You could pop out the wood box engine cover & facing, rear access panel and both sides without tools. A little more work with a screwdriver and the whole frame around the engine comes out. The interior joinery & cabnitry is all bolted in and all removable.

But that mostly is true for the "classic plastic" boats designed in the 70's before the molded liners became the norm. The interior is bolted or screwed in. Some - Westsail 32 and Southern Cross 31 for example - could be purchased without any interior fixtures, fittings or furnishings and you built it the way you wanted.

The rest of the maintenance can be a bother. For some reason 12 foot teak handrails, cabin length teak "eyebrows" and full length teak toe rails seemed to be fashionable. Keep you busy finishing and re-bedding continually.

I had an '00 Catalina 34 MkII and there was not a sliver of wood or a molecule of brass on the exterior. Talk about ease of maintenance. ;-)
__________________
Charlie P. P31-2 #80 CATNAP

To travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive - R.L. Stevenson

I suspect that, if you should go to the end of the world, you would find somebody there going farther . . . - H.D. Thoreau

Last edited by Delirious; 10-12-2008 at 09:51 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 10-12-2008
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: OKECHOBEE FL
Posts: 26
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
kale is on a distinguished road
a boat designed for easy mant would be a dream or maybe a dream boat
__________________
KALE S/V PRIVATE DANCER CABO RICO 38
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 10-12-2008
Classic30's Avatar
Once known as Hartley18
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,526
Thanks: 28
Thanked 42 Times in 42 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Classic30 will become famous soon enough Classic30 will become famous soon enough
Everything in a Hartley TS is accessible for maintenance.

The entire structure inside can (and often is!) removed and replaced, just because someone wants to try something different.. That's why the darned thing is so heavy!

There are plenty of boats out there where access to every part of the interior is possible - and not for a midget with dentist's tools - but they're probably not the latest light-weight go-fast designs.
__________________
-
"Honestly, I don't know why seamen persist in getting wrecked in some of the outlandish places they do, when they can do it in a nice place like Fiji." -- John Caldwell, "Desperate Voyage"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 10-12-2008
davidpm's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Madison
Posts: 3,703
Thanks: 166
Thanked 40 Times in 33 Posts
Rep Power: 7
davidpm is on a distinguished road
Thanks Cam I'll check it out.
Designs that annoy me include:

Tanks that can not be removed.
Engines that have poor access.
steering cables with limited access.
Headliner that prevent me from tightening deck mounted hardware.

It seems like every boat I look at has one or more of these "features"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 10-12-2008
davidpm's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Madison
Posts: 3,703
Thanks: 166
Thanked 40 Times in 33 Posts
Rep Power: 7
davidpm is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartley18 View Post
There are plenty of boats out there where access to every part of the interior is possible - and not for a midget with dentist's tools - but they're probably not the latest light-weight go-fast designs.

I'm interrested in that list.
Most of the ones I've seen are not like that.

Some examples?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 10-12-2008
Classic30's Avatar
Once known as Hartley18
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,526
Thanks: 28
Thanked 42 Times in 42 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Classic30 will become famous soon enough Classic30 will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
I'm interrested in that list.
Most of the ones I've seen are not like that.

Some examples?
That could take a while.. but scattered offerings from Adams, Catalina and Northshore are some that come to mind... pretty much any dearly-loved cruising yacht from the 70's/80's and anything "home-built" (eg. many Roberts designs).

It's tricky to make a definite list because, until mass-manufacturing of interiors came in vogue, any two boats of the same design could be completely (totally) different inside - one easy to access, the other a minefield - depending upon the PO's desire to tinker.

It's probably easier to point out yachts (like Farrs!) that are crap for interior accessibility - right from the factory.

Cameron
__________________
-
"Honestly, I don't know why seamen persist in getting wrecked in some of the outlandish places they do, when they can do it in a nice place like Fiji." -- John Caldwell, "Desperate Voyage"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 10-12-2008
artbyjody's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Bellingham, PNW
Posts: 3,146
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
artbyjody is just really nice artbyjody is just really nice artbyjody is just really nice artbyjody is just really nice
I think I may have the almost perfect boat for that.

1. Headliner just pops off in sections so no worries there for bolt access.
2. Every valve, pump, etc is within easy access (aft bunks are on wood slabs - lift up cushion and wood flats in sections, repeated through out the boat.)
3. Engine Access is 270 degrees .
4. Wiring is relatively easy to access.
5. Bilge - just lift up floorboards.
6. My interior is mainly screw in, but not too much is located "hidden" that requires disassembly (less the toe rail bolts).
7. All tanks are easily removable without moving anything major.

I think you need to look for a Barberis
__________________
-- Jody

S/V "
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
" -
1983, Barberis Show 38! or
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.








Last edited by artbyjody; 10-12-2008 at 11:16 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 10-13-2008
JohnRPollard's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chesapeake
Posts: 5,680
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 10
JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
...Designs that annoy me include:

Tanks that can not be removed.
Engines that have poor access.
steering cables with limited access.
Headliner that prevent me from tightening deck mounted hardware.

It seems like every boat I look at has one or more of these "features"
Look at the Pacific Seacraft range. I would say on balance that they are quite a bit better than most for accessibility/serviceability.

Our fuel tank is easily removable.

Water tanks have access ports and full removable lids.

Our engine has 270 access with a quick flip up lid, plus rear side access through a removable hatch. Most PSCs have a removable cockpit sole/hatch that allows even easier engine access and removal if necessary (our model is the only Crealock PSC without that feature).




Our steering cables are easily accessed via a removable panel in the quarterberth.




Also, the PSC headliners have full length zippers that allow access to the underside of the deck.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Pacific Seacraft Crealock 31 #62

NEVER CALLS CRUISINGDAD BACK....CAN"T TAKE THE ACCENT
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Re-naming the boat pirateofcapeann General Discussion (sailing related) 130 01-07-2014 11:14 AM
Construction of a PVC (Divinycell) cored boat Giulietta Sailboat Design and Construction 8 10-19-2007 05:46 PM
Trailering? Pick a Boat Bruce Caldwell Cruising Articles 0 07-22-2004 08:00 PM
Naming and Renaming Your Boat Sue & Larry Buying a Boat Articles 0 12-15-2003 07:00 PM
Performing in Light Air Brian Hancock Learning to Sail Articles 0 01-15-2003 07:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:58 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.