Anyone read the new PS article on new boat design? - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sailboat Design and Construction
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  #1  
Old 01-30-2009
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Anyone read the new PS article on new boat design?

Curious to read the reactions. They essentially rip all modern boat designs, stating that the wide beam, shallow bilge, fin keel, spade rudder concept makes for ill-mannered boats. The analysis is relatively technical, and quite interesting.

The net-net is that modern designs make for more weather helm, and less manners in gusts and higher winds.

They don't seem to focus too much on how the newer boats are much faster (though they mention this, it's presented as a negative, cause the ability to go fast means it's harder to sail (?)), the boats tend to be more user friendly from a sail control perspective, and they are a bit more comfortable off the wind.

You can't say the analysis is "wrong" in my opinion, but I definitely got the sense that the author longs for the good old days, everything old is good and anything new-fangled is bad.

Just my sense. I'll be curious to read other's.
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Old 01-30-2009
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everything old is good and anything new-fangled is bad.
yes - are you suggesting that there is something wrong with this concept ???



Modern sport boats are not particularly seaworthy and they are definitely not comfortable.
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Old 01-30-2009
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I think this POV has been ongoing for over 30 years now.

I've got some Sailing and Sail Magazines ca. 1973-1978 - and there are similar articles about the so-called go fast boats of the mid-late 70's.

At the end of the day, what matters is what where you sail and how often one uses their boat. I'm happy with my fin keel, wide beam, shallow bilge 1985 S2. Serves my purpose, I enjoy time spent day sailing and beer can racing.

To each their own - as long as we have the time to enjoy being on the water.
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Old 01-30-2009
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Did not read article. But I must admit that I agree with much of the sentiment. While I think that there are a lot of attractive features such as water accesable transoms, I cannot offhand think of a current production boat that I would be wanting to buy, even if I had the money. I used to think that I would want a Caliber 40 but I have since changed my mind. I just don't hear about many HunterCatalinaBeneteaus doing trans-Atlantics. I like boats that are moderate in all proportions. I look at new boats at the dock and they seem way to broad on the beam for my thinking. Additionally, I don't feel that a 36 fter with 5.5 ft draft to be shallow draft.
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Old 01-30-2009
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There are lots of great bluewater boats still being produced and many are better than ever. Problem is the size and price. The Caliber40 is the only one mere mortals might be able to afford from here in the States. (The rejuvenated PSC may provide some smaller boats as well perhaps.)
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Old 01-30-2009
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Daniel,

Did you happen to note the author of that article? Also, which issue did it appear in?

I may try to pick up a copy of PS -- I let my subscription lapse many years ago...
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Old 01-30-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRPollard View Post
Daniel,

Did you happen to note the author of that article? Also, which issue did it appear in?

I may try to pick up a copy of PS -- I let my subscription lapse many years ago...
February 2009. No author. "Per curiam" to us lawyer types, which means no one was brave enough to put their own name on it, so they just leave it with no author. I'm just joking; PS often has pieces with no author listed. I'm not sure of the person who actually writes the articles in those situations.

Cam, I don't think they're saying that NO boats being built today are any good. They really are taking a swipe, in my view, at the mainstream production boat builders who are maximizing performance and space, and not paying enough attention to motion underway and stuff like that. It's hard to say they're "wrong," but I suspect they are the same people who said nothing good would come of roller furling jibs, GPS, autopilots, composite sails, electricity, automobiles, the microwave oven, computers, modern medicine, etc.
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Old 01-30-2009
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Yeah...probably sextant guys!
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Old 01-31-2009
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how's that different than most of the folks around here? (ducking)
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Old 01-31-2009
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Assuming Practical Sailing is still in business 20 years from now, they (and most of those who believe that only the old rugged boats of the past are seaworthy) will be trashing the 2029 production models saying that they just don't match up with the rugged seaworthy boats produced in the late 1990's and early 2000's. They'll be recommending that you go off shore in a large Catalina, Beneteau, or Hunter...unless of course, you can afford a Hinkley, Pacific Seacraft or such from the same period. I don't see many boats around today from the 1930's and 1940's or even the 1950's ( I understand they were wood and fiberglass lasts longer....but there are still those who preach the virtures of wood boats, and even a few who still produce them...consider Wooden Boat magazine). Those boats that were built in the late 1960's and 1970's that are so considered to be blue water boats will be a lot older and most will be retired by that time.

I understand that others feel otherwise, but this is my opinion....just don't trash my Catalina, because it'll be a good commodity in the 2029 used market.
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