Cal 29 cockpit drain - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sailboat Design and Construction
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 05-11-2009
L124C's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,385
Thanks: 48
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 7
L124C is on a distinguished road
Cal 29 cockpit drain

A dock mates Cal 29's cockpit drain consists of a rubber plug in the stern. I was at the helm and he remarked that there was some water in the cockpit, and we should drain it when we were no longer under sail. I reached down with my bare foot and took the plug out, assuming that surely it was designed to drain while underway. He informed me that, in fact, I was letting the bay into the boat! I asked him what would happen if the boat got popped. He said that he has been in fairly large seas and has never been pooped. The boat has a large cockpit. I have always heard good things about Cal's and was impressed with the way the boat sailed. It felt much larger than it's 29 feet. For the life of me, I can't figure out way Cal would have used this method to drain a large cockpit. I mean, sure, you have have only one thru hull, but one good following wave would turn the large cockpit into a giant Jacuzzi! Can anyone enlighten me as to Cal's strategy?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 05-11-2009
svHyLyte's Avatar
Old as Dirt!
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Tampa Bay Area
Posts: 2,650
Thanks: 11
Thanked 101 Times in 96 Posts
Rep Power: 6
svHyLyte is on a distinguished road
Out'a Trim?

The cockpit drain on a Cal 29 consists of an approximately 3" dia hole at the base of the transom in a small well slightly below the level of the cockpit sole (we owned a Cal 29 for many years). If that drain is below the water level under any but very limited circumstances the yacht is out of trim sternward. One friend of ours installed an external "flapper" type drain cover on his boat as, occassionally, he would get some water into the cockpit from a stern wave but we rarely ever had that occur on our boat, even in very heavy following seas (fwiw our auxillary was a Yanmar 2GMFW). In no case should that drain be blocked as the cockpit will hold a heck of a lot of water which will make the yacht unmanagable in heavy seas.

FWIW...

s/v HyLyte
__________________
"It is not so much for its beauty that the sea makes a claim upon men's hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air, that emanation from the waves, that so wonderfully renews a weary spirit."
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I 28 cockpit drain and garboard plug TundraDown Islander 2 09-27-2008 08:44 AM
The Cruising Cockpit Sue & Larry Buying a Boat Articles 0 07-08-2003 08:00 PM
The Cruising Cockpit Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 07-08-2003 08:00 PM
The Cruising Cockpit Sue & Larry Cruising Articles 0 07-08-2003 08:00 PM
The Cruising Cockpit Sue & Larry Her Sailnet Articles 0 07-08-2003 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:14 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.