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OsmundL 05-22-2009 10:12 AM

Zero buoyancy
 
2 Attachment(s)
I wish to dedicate this thread to Sailingdog. I cannot imagine him dodging this bait :) (and we might agree this time)

This craft, Mirabaud LX 2009, has been on its first test sail. Based on an 18ft skiff, it is designed with no - zero - buoyancy in the hull.
Might it be eligible for our Blue Water Cruiser list?

Valiente 05-22-2009 12:38 PM

So do you need to get a running start with it?

WouldaShoulda 05-22-2009 12:45 PM

Just because something can be done, doesn't mean it should be done!!

zz4gta 05-22-2009 01:26 PM

looks like a big moth.

pdqaltair 05-22-2009 01:50 PM

Or is there clear plastic sheathing?
 
1111

merc2dogs 05-22-2009 02:27 PM

Did a quick search on it, and found a u-tube vid, apparently of the first test sail, pretty interesting. You really have to watch when it hits the brakes....

YouTube - 26.04.2008 -- Mirabaud LX

Ken.

pdqaltair 05-22-2009 03:06 PM

"Just because it can be done"....Wow. Too much time to think?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by merc2dogs (Post 488650)
Did a quick search on it, and found a u-tube vid, apparently of the first test sail, pretty interesting. You really have to watch when it hits the brakes....

YouTube - 26.04.2008 -- Mirabaud LX

Ken.

1111

sailingdog 05-25-2009 08:53 PM

Big deal...it's a monohull that can sink... :) :D

KeelHaulin 05-27-2009 04:28 PM

I'd say that the tubular CF frame probably has enough internal buoyancy to keep the frame, rig, crew afloat while not sailing. In that sense; it is not zero buoyancy, if it were it would go to the bottom of whatever lake or bay they were sailing in when it stopped. Seems like a small planing hull would be a better choice since it would reduce friction while sailing in non-hydroplaning conditions. (A design like the Moth is more practical IMHO).

OsmundL 05-27-2009 05:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KeelHaulin (Post 489957)
I'd say that the tubular CF frame probably has enough internal buoyancy to keep the frame, rig, crew afloat while not sailing. In that sense; it is not zero buoyancy, if it were it would go to the bottom of whatever lake or bay they were sailing in when it stopped. Seems like a small planing hull would be a better choice since it would reduce friction while sailing in non-hydroplaning conditions. (A design like the Moth is more practical IMHO).

I have to agree with the "bottom of lake" scenario. In the article they claimed "zero buoyancy", but I guess they stretch the truth a little.


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