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post #1 of 12 Old 06-06-2010 Thread Starter
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ganley yachts

looking for information on the ganley tara and timerider models these are new zealand design steelchine boats around the 40 ft mark.
thanks
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post #2 of 12 Old 06-07-2010
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Taiko, Hello and welcome to the board.

I don't know a lot about Ganley designs as such although by reputation they are solid old ladies, built like the proverbial brick portaloo though not terribly fast. Quality can vary enormously depending on whether professional or amateur build and budget. Some home built Ganleys I have seen had quirky, to be kind, interior fitouts.

Ganley Yachts

Our old girl is a Van de Stadt design built in steel and so has that in common with many Ganleys. Having owned a 34' steeler for the past five years I'd tend to advise staying clear of steel under 40' and probably under 45. The material itself is too heavy so you end up with less weight where you most need it and more where you don't. As an example of that our 34'er is 20% heavier than if built in timber or aluminium while carrying 10% less ballast.

Some of the Ganley's are quite handsome though I have to say I think Van de Stadt for one in general design more pleasing shapes. That's personal opinion of course.

Ganley web site is above but you also might like to have a look at

crew.org.nz (kiwi site I used to visit a lot. good people.)

and

metalboatbuilding.org (as the name implies. lots of info, again good people.)

Anything else I can help you with, just ask.

cheers

Andrew B

“Life is a trick, and you get one chance to learn it.”
― Terry Pratchett, Nation

Malo 39 Classic
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post #3 of 12 Old 01-16-2012
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Ganleys are great designs. He got his hands dirty building them, so they go together extremely easily.
Older, turn of the century boats were heavy, but they had enormous sail area.
I love my steel 31 footer, and people who have my 25 footer in steel are happy with them.
It's not just a matter of weight, but weight to sail area. I was told that if I designed a 40 footer it would be extremely popular. I did and the plans for my 36 footer still outsell the 40 by a very wide margin. The key to smaller boats in steel is simplifying them so they don't have a lot of unnecessary steel in them. Origami building methods do that. Do a search under origamiboats for more info and a great chatline.
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post #4 of 12 Old 01-16-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
Taiko, Hello and welcome to the board.

I don't know a lot about Ganley designs as such although by reputation they are solid old ladies, built like the proverbial brick portaloo though not terribly fast. Quality can vary enormously depending on whether professional or amateur build and budget. Some home built Ganleys I have seen had quirky, to be kind, interior fitouts.

Ganley Yachts

Our old girl is a Van de Stadt design built in steel and so has that in common with many Ganleys. Having owned a 34' steeler for the past five years I'd tend to advise staying clear of steel under 40' and probably under 45. The material itself is too heavy so you end up with less weight where you most need it and more where you don't. As an example of that our 34'er is 20% heavier than if built in timber or aluminium while carrying 10% less ballast.

Some of the Ganley's are quite handsome though I have to say I think Van de Stadt for one in general design more pleasing shapes. That's personal opinion of course.

Ganley web site is above but you also might like to have a look at

crew.org.nz (kiwi site I used to visit a lot. good people.)

and

metalboatbuilding.org (as the name implies. lots of info, again good people.)

Anything else I can help you with, just ask.

cheers
I always liked the looks of the Ganley "passagemaker". I think it is a 42'. Saw some nice ones in NZ, but also many, many home finished jobs that were really poorly done.


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post #5 of 12 Old 01-16-2012
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I actually got a chance to sail on one of Brent Swain's 36 footers on Puget Sound. I was truly amazed at well it sailed, and it tracked like it was on rails! My first encounter with Brent's building method was a sequence of photos someone posted. The first photo was the building site. It looked like the guy was driving down the road, spotted a pasture and said "Here's a good spot. A couple of pictures later he's pulling the two halves of the hull together, supported by a couple of chunks of firewood. After two weeks he had a complete hull, cockpit, deck and coachroof all put together! It needed final welding of all seams, sandblasting and painting and complete fitting out, but amazing none the less.

Gary H. Lucas
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post #6 of 12 Old 01-17-2012
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If it's okay to jump in on this thread, I'm looking at this 1996 Ganley Snowbird:

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi..._id=15664&url=

Word from the broker is that it was built by a marine mechanic that had built 13 boats previously. The builder deviated from the designers instructions by using 3/16" steel on the hull, instead of 1/8".

The problem that the boat has is some corrosion in the engine compartment, fuel tank, and battery bay. From the pictures I've seen, the corrosion looks superficial in the battery bay, the engine compartment may need new steel welded for the mount brackets, and the fuel tank is unknown but has surface corrosion on the tank lid (the tank is integral to the hull).

Does anyone have any thoughts on these issues? I hadn't really seriously considered a steel boat until now.

Thanks

Last edited by Kielanders; 01-17-2012 at 04:20 PM.
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post #7 of 12 Old 01-17-2012
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The original Ganley Snowbird was designed with 3/16th plate , which first got me interested in steel ,when it was first featured in Sea Spray magazine in Auckland in 73. Great design.
I like to put a plexi window in the fuel tank lid ,so I can check the inside any time.
Drag your fingernails over the foam and listen for any hollow sounds where the foam has separated from the steel , chip out the foam there, and check to see if the steel has been properly painted before foaming.
Lack of paint under the foam is a common mistake among many commercial builders.
One can check the thickness of the steel anywhere with a centre punch and a hammer. If you can whack it hard with the centre punch, and it doesn't give, there is plenty of steel there.
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post #8 of 12 Old 01-17-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
The original Ganley Snowbird was designed with 3/16th plate , which first got me interested in steel ,when it was first featured in Sea Spray magazine in Auckland in 73. Great design.
I like to put a plexi window in the fuel tank lid ,so I can check the inside any time.
Drag your fingernails over the foam and listen for any hollow sounds where the foam has separated from the steel , chip out the foam there, and check to see if the steel has been properly painted before foaming.
Lack of paint under the foam is a common mistake among many commercial builders.
One can check the thickness of the steel anywhere with a centre punch and a hammer. If you can whack it hard with the centre punch, and it doesn't give, there is plenty of steel there.
Thanks for your thoughts.

I haven't had it surveyed yet. The last survey in '04, provided by the broker, had an ultrasound of the hull done with no defects. The top of the fuel tank is steel, and has some corrosion.

I can pull the engine and do the work, but if it's spread to the rest of the interior hull, it's a concern. It's been on the market awhile, and a significant price drop, but I don't want to overlook a great boat, when it's price may just be a reflection of the economy and not its condition.
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post #9 of 12 Old 01-17-2012
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That's a lot of extra steel. How will it affect the sailing characteristics? I think it will be a detriment. The spec's called for 1/8" for a reason. Go for a test sail with somebody that is knowledgeable. The price may be good, but you'll get what you pay for.....


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post #10 of 12 Old 01-18-2012
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There is no shortage of cruisers happily cruising in steel boats under 40 feet, some much smaller. The 40 ft minimum for steel is a myth.
3/16th plate gives you lots of room for corrosion, with little worry about strength. Light rust on 3/16th means nothing. It would take heavy flaking rust to become a structural concern. As corrosion doubles for every ten degrees rise in temperature, a boat in BC all her life is far less likely to have major structural loss of strength from corrosion, than one in the tropics..I have seen many steel boats plated with 1/8hth inch plate, rusted thru, when, had they been made of 3/16th, they could have had decades more life.
I never liked 1/8th plate, and seeing the Snowbird featured in Sea Spray Magazine in December 73, with 3/16th plate specified, was what first got me interested in steel boats . Cement hulls of the time were 12 lbs per sq ft, so the 3/16th plate at 7.5 seemed reasonable, especially if one used shape and the extra thickness to reduce the weight of internal framing. Being a steel worker all my life, I realized how much easier it was to keep 3/16th fair, and how much tougher it is. Corrosion forgiveness was an added bonus.

Brent Swain, Boat designer, Builder, and author of "Origami Metal Boatbuilding"

Last edited by Brent Swain; 01-18-2012 at 05:04 PM.
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