Standing Rigging: Rod vs Wire - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sailboat Design and Construction
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 11-18-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 44
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
SeaQwest is on a distinguished road
Standing Rigging: Rod vs Wire

Fellow sailnetters,

I would be interested in learning the pros and cons of rod versus wire standing rigging methods.

I have always heard rod was better, but, if so, why? Do both require tuning at similar intervals? With "normal" use, how long could each be expected to last before all new rigging needs to be installed - 10, 20, 30 years?

I am sure this topic has been covered before, but I have not been able to find. As always, thanks for the education.

Jim
SeaQwest
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 11-18-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Rod has pros and cons like any rigging.

Pros: Lighter, less weight aloft, lower windage, greater strength to weight ratio.

Cons: harder to inspect, can fail with little warning, harder to replace or repair in remote ports,

As for how long it lasts, it depends on whether you're on salt or fresh water, whether you sail year round or for just the sailing season, whether you race or just cruise, etc.


Wire rigging is heavier, creates more windage and has a lower strength-to-weight ratio than rod, but is easier to replace, can be replaced using all ship-board hand tools, is easier to inspect. You can easily carry spare wire-rope rigging, but carrying spare rod rigging is much more difficult.

Synthetic rigging, like Colligo's Dynex Dux-based rigging, is also a reasonable choice, but it is more expensive than wire rope or rod rigging generally. It is lighter and has a better strength-to-weight ratio than metal rigging, but is susceptible to being cut...
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 11-18-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 44
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
SeaQwest is on a distinguished road
Thanks Sailingdog. I would have naively guessed rod to be the heavier of the two because it is suppose to be stronger and, of course, less flexible.

As for longevity, let's say the boat is docked in the northeast in saltwater, used 6 months a year as a coastal cruiser and never raced. Generally, I would assume the rigging, if wire, would be good for about 10 years. Would it be a significantly longer life span for rod rigging?

Which would be the more desirable rigging on a mid-size (35') coastal cruiser, occasionally bluewatered, never raced, mono-hull sailing vessel?

Wow...that "can fail with little warning" part is scary!

Thanks again.

Jim
SeaQwest
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 11-18-2010
tommays's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,041
Thanks: 1
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tommays will become famous soon enough
Anything can fail without warning

We have rod on my friends the 35' and it was replaced at 20 ? some odd years of nothing but racing

The good thing is its Navtec and all top shelf stuff the bad thing is cost a LOT of money

The only real way to test the rod is to cut the end off and run it through the head forming machine

If it takes a new head its OK if not its BAD
__________________
1970 Cal 29 Sea Fever

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

1981 J24 Tangent 2930
Tommays
Northport NY


If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 11-20-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 44
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
SeaQwest is on a distinguished road
Thanks Tommays. 20+ years! It may cost more, but if you get twice the life span, it should be worth it.

Based on what I am hearing, rod seems to be the more desirable rigging.

Thanks.

Jim
SeaQwest
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 11-20-2010
Vasco's Avatar
Warm Weather Sailor
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 954
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Vasco is on a distinguished road
I have rod rigging on my CS36M. The boat has been down south for 8 trips so it's had salt and fresh water. Bought it in 1988, still going strong, 22 years. Kinked the forestay once when removing the mast, had to replace it. Other than that no problems. We remove the mast every fall and the rod rigging is a bit unwieldy compared with wire but you get used to it.
__________________
Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 11-20-2010
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 14,390
Thanks: 63
Thanked 160 Times in 157 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
Over the years we've had two rod rigging failures. One a D1 shroud, the other a deckstay, both on a 40 footer we owned previously. A quick tack saved the rig in the first instance.

Both failures were traced to seized rod end fittings in the turnbuckle barrel. (actually the deck stay had been welded to the turnbuckle... same effect) As it was explained to me, every time the load surges on a rig, eg going over a wave, there's a torsional stress applied (ie the rod twists and untwists a bit) The rod end is meant to move within the turnbuckle at this time. If the rod end is seized that stress 'works' the rod where it exits the turnbuckle, eventually failing there. Whoever welded our deckstay created the same scenario.

The rigging was, to our knowledge, original and about 15 years old at the time. We subsequently loosened the rig, opened up and freed all the rod ends, applying lanakote to keep the ends free and had no further issues - I believe the boat is still sailing today with the same rod, other than the replaced parts, now well over 20 years on.

There's lots to like about rod, but wire will often give you some warning, or more easily observed indication of pending failure.
__________________
Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 11-22-2010
paulk's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: CT/ Long Island Sound
Posts: 2,478
Thanks: 4
Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 14
paulk is on a distinguished road
We replaced our rod forestay a season back, when we put in roller-furling and found that the original forestay had a kink in it, hidden underneath the tuff-luff for we don't know how long. The rigger said the heads on the Navtec rod tend to crack through metal fatigue: repeated loading and unloading. He would have simply re-headed the original rod if it hadn't had the kink. We've raced our boat hard for the past 12 years, but she was built in 1981. We do look over the rig carefully each season, but not with dye or anything too fancy.
Things can break, anytime, of course. On a different boat I was on, we had a wire shroud suddenly let go in the Bay of Biscay, despite it's having been carefully checked over before the boat had sailed Transatlantic, up the Irish Sea to the Hebridies, and back down to the Gironde estuary.

Last edited by paulk; 11-22-2010 at 06:39 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 11-22-2010
TomKeffer's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
TomKeffer is on a distinguished road
Navtec offers an excellent (albeit very conservative) guide to inspecting rigging, including guides to the life expectancy of rod rigging.
__________________
S/V Velocity
J/42 #39
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 11-22-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
It depends. If you are going cruising, I would recommend wire, not rod, rigging. You can't really carry spare rod rigging very easily. You can't adjust the length of it without specialized tools, where mechanical fittings--like Hayn HiMod, StaLok and Norseman--allow you to shorten wire rigging with only basic handtools.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaQwest View Post
Thanks Tommays. 20+ years! It may cost more, but if you get twice the life span, it should be worth it.

Based on what I am hearing, rod seems to be the more desirable rigging.

Thanks.

Jim
SeaQwest
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Q: Standing rig wire size ulferlingsson Gear & Maintenance 1 06-11-2010 10:17 AM
New Standing Rigging (wire) riphonda Gear & Maintenance 15 06-04-2009 02:36 PM
Wire Luff Sails (free standing furling) ranes Gear & Maintenance 2 07-04-2008 03:03 AM
which wire rope for hand press fittings / standing rig gjxj Gear & Maintenance 6 08-16-2006 11:19 AM
Standing rigging wire type ricekrgr Gear & Maintenance 1 03-28-2006 12:34 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:48 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012