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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sailboat Design and Construction
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  #11  
Old 11-24-2011
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Which Hunter 25 do you have? In 1983 or so there was a brand new one on the dock next to my 1976 Hunter 27. I thought the 1983 25 was a very nice little boat. In fact I took the inexperienced owner out on a day when it was really blowing. We put a double reef in the main a reef in the jib (never saw that before) and the boat handled beautifully.

The bulkheads bonded to the hull but not to the deck is very common on small boats. All the bonding is done, and tanks, heads, stoves, and such are put in place before the deck is installed.

Gary H. Lucas
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Old 11-25-2011
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It is a 1981 hunter 25, cherubini designed, with shoal draft keel. I am actually very fond of the boat, even though it is not as sturdily built as some other brands (I can see sunlight through the glass in some of the upper parts of the hull).

I just received "this old boat" in the mail. Wow, this book is great. Haven't gotten to bulkheads yet, but it has already given me several really good ideas for fixing some other issues I have with the boat.
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Old 11-25-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterchech View Post
It is a 1981 hunter 25, cherubini designed, with shoal draft keel. I am actually very fond of the boat, even though it is not as sturdily built as some other brands (I can see sunlight through the glass in some of the upper parts of the hull).
On many boats you can see light through the layup. It is because they were laminated with clear resin - not a problem. It has nothing to do with strength.
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Old 11-25-2011
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I totally agree with Brian's post above that indicates that "seeing light" through the fiberglass is not a sign of a problem. I would also suggest that bulkheads are often lightly tabbed to the hull to allow flex and prevent hard spots on the hull. It would be wise to determine what the structural specs of the design are and if the bulkheads are intended to be structural components within the design. Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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Old 11-28-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
On many boats you can see light through the layup. It is because they were laminated with clear resin - not a problem. It has nothing to do with strength.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainForce View Post
I totally agree with Brian's post above that indicates that "seeing light" through the fiberglass is not a sign of a problem. I would also suggest that bulkheads are often lightly tabbed to the hull to allow flex and prevent hard spots on the hull. It would be wise to determine what the structural specs of the design are and if the bulkheads are intended to be structural components within the design. Take care and joy, Aythya crew

Well that is all comforting thanks
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Old 12-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SailKing1 View Post
Here is a good article from west systems I used when I replaced the bulkheads in my islander.

WEST SYSTEM | Projects | Fiberglass Boat Repair and Restoration - Replacing damaged bulkheads
I had a bulkhead that was rotted out completely due to years of unattended leaking through chainplate openings. In addition to the method suggested By West, I would add this: Get a 5/8" drill rasp with a really long commercial-duty 3/8" extension. WITHOUT removing the tabbing, if in good shape, you can very effectively remove all the old rotten wood and clean up the insides of the tabbing structure with the rasp and drill. Make a thin vacuum head out of some aluminum flashing to remove dust as you go. A new bulkhead pattern can be easily made by trimming some pieces of 3' rosin paper little by little until it fits perfectly inside the curve of the hull. When the piece is ready to insert, really saturate the cleaned out "pocket" formed by the old tabbing with epoxy to fill any voids and coat the wood as well. I used some self tapping s.s. screws to draw the tabbing to the plywood and squeeze out excess epoxy. This method saves removing lockers, cabinets, etc. that might be attached and destroyed to get to the old tabbing to remove it. On my boat, the old tabbing was very heavily laid up and still in excellent shape. No reason to remove it. Removing it would have meant doing much demolition/reconstruction.
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Old 12-30-2011
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Originally Posted by peterchech View Post
I have missed alot of sailing days this season due to high winds. The furling jib is near useluss, a parachute, when reefed. The main has no drive at all without at least some jib out. When out in these conditions, if I have to release the reefed jib because it is a big parachute edging me to a knockdown, and it goes flapping in a loooong gust, I see the whole rig being seriously stressed. It has never been replaced since 1981. I will be re-rigging anyway in a year or two (saving for it), so I was thinking why not replace with upgraded rigging? But truthfully, I may remove the roller furler and replace with hank-on jibs. That way I will be able to reef effectively, and still have control of the boat. And the properly shaped jib probably won't stress the rig nearly as much...
Getting off topic, but you need to move the cars for the jib sheets forward when you reef. You can't simply wind up the furler and expect the jib to perform. Your head sail may be worn out, but even a new one won't perform without this adjustment. A rough adjustment should have the projected sheet dividing the furled jib in half. Fine tune from there. If your reefing your head sail on a regular basis, it's simply too big (you didn't mention size). Though I have a 90% head sail, I fly a 100% on the SF Bay year around, and reef it occasionally. I know several skippers who fly 130's during the Summer and can't I imagine why.
While hanked on is the way to go for serious racing IMO, there are a lot of advantages to a furler for the Bay Sailor/Cruiser. I'll bet a loft can make an appropriate reefable head sail for you for less than than converting back to hanks and throwing away a furler. I tend to be a purest when it comes to sail shape and wouldn't have added a furler to my boat if it didn't come with one. However, I have no intention of getting rid of it!

Last edited by L124C; 12-30-2011 at 03:28 PM.
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Old 12-30-2011
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Well I have a furler (came with the boat), but it works with my hanked on sails. I have a 110 jib that is appropriate for winter conditions and a #3 that I use in the summer on the bay. Furling is not reefing, and while I have jib cars that adjust from the cockpit, I would strongly advocate a sail change over a furled reef. So many problems can arise with the lack of ability to reduce sail area in a hurry that I don't see a reason to risk it.
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Old 12-30-2011
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"I would also suggest that bulkheads are often lightly tabbed to the hull to allow flex and prevent hard spots on the hull."

Really? I always thought that was just sloppy scribing of the bulkheads on behalf of the original boatwrights. Good to know, I'll sleep better.
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Old 12-30-2011
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A properly tabbed bulkhead has either foam or a gap between the actual bulkhead and the hull and is heavily tabbed. It shouldn't flex any more than the hull itself flexes.

If the bulkhead is tabbed lightly or in only a few places it is not strong enough.
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