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  #11  
Old 04-10-2012
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Re: Islander 36

Thanks SloopJonB,

Your comments as regards the issue of the 10 years was enlightening.

Yes, it would be crevice corrosion in the lower swages that would worry me.

Regards...
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  #12  
Old 04-10-2012
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Re: Islander 36

Miles-
Replacement of the standing rigging (rod, cable, terminals, all of it) is really based on several factors that are not easily measured on any one boat. There is the quality of the metal, assuming nothing is counterfeit which you can't assume these days. Then there are environmental effects, how much salt, moisture, heat, thermal cycling, any coatings to block oxidation, any wrappings to rap water, etc. For the rigging itself the single greatest issue may be work loading, i.e. as the cable or rod stretches under load, then eases off as you tack the other way. Every load cycle brings it closer to failure.

In the north you also have problems from water getting into joints and swages, and then freeze expanding over the winter. This breaks down mountains so rigging is not going to endure it either.

All of these things vary greatly depending on the use of the boat, and NavTec even goes by how many miles a boat has sailed, as a rough way to correlate to work load cycles. None of these factors would be hard to measure in a lab, but in the real world? Who knows what a used boat really went through?

You can of course test the rigging with dye checks, or pull it and have it magnafluxed and x-rayed. But for most people, the cost of doing that brings you to a point where it is not practical, and as long as you're pulling the rigging, it becomes easier to pick some "not unreasonable" point like 10-20 years and say OK, I'm going to replace the rigging now, all of it. Based on your best guess as to how it was used, on any visible signs of deterioration, etc.

With wire rigging if you find any meathooks--even one--that's a sign wire strands are breaking, time to replace. With stainless fittings, if you find even one crack, again, that's a sign, time to replace. If you are sailing in a lake in moderate weather and a failure would simply mean "Honey dinner will be late" you can put it off longer. If you're oging offshore and can't be certain of kind winds and smooth seas...safer to use the calendar or replace at the first sign of deterioration.

Until Walmart starts selling home xray inspection kits, that is. (G)
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  #13  
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Re: Islander 36

Thanks hellosailor,

Yes, all that you say makes sense. And yes I was aware of dye checks, not that I have ever done it.

I was trying to be a bit more specific in terms of if I were to buy a yacht on the West Coast - maybe in the LA area.

The yachts I had been considering were older yachts but it appears to me that many might have just sat in marinas most of their lives - more like floating caravans - now I stand to be corrected on this - this is just my speculation but also based on how little cruising equipment they seem to have and that the equipment they do have seems to revolve around Tv's, 110 volt fridges, BBQ's and microwaves!

Thus I would be implying that there would have been low fatigue cycles and that there would have been no issues of water freezing in swages?

Yes, if I saw the slightest sign of cracks or deterioration, then I would have to replace.

I think my discomfort (without careful consideration) would be if there was no apparent signs of deterioration, yet the rigging was say over 15 years - then what?

Thanks for your input :-)
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Old 04-11-2012
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Re: Islander 36

Dock queens in a warm environment, you might be OK. If there were no other signs of corrosion. Still, as you get to 20 years old, you might find your insurer simply wanting it replaced.
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Re: Islander 36

Insurance? third party only... if I write it off, I will put it down to experience.. and also why I don't want to spend a huge amount on a yacht...

I think as I grow older, I realise our time is finite... something you don't think about when you are younger...

My friend has written his yacht (40ft) off 3 times... they won't insure him again..

But he's very philosophical... he says "Miles, I am not sure if this is a lesson or a message"... :-)
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Re: Islander 36

Oh, and one of those write off's was when the back stay gave way with inline spreaders and the spinnaker up.. glad I was not on board....

I should (will) ask him what part of the back stay broke, I suspect it was a fitting...

I don't think there is as much publication and analysis when things go wrong in sailing as there is in aviation....

I am always grateful when others share their miss-haps as I think there is so much to learn.....

I guess I could do more reading about rigging failures....
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Re: Islander 36

"I don't think there is as much publication and analysis when things go wrong in sailing as there is in aviation...."

Probably because boats rarely fall out of the sky and crash into populated areas.

Rarely. But hey, I'm sure it could happen.
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Re: Islander 36

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
"I don't think there is as much publication and analysis when things go wrong in sailing as there is in aviation...."

Probably because boats rarely fall out of the sky and crash into populated areas.

Rarely. But hey, I'm sure it could happen.
That reminded me of the episode of "Hill St. Blues" where the cow fell out of the helicopter sling and landed on the hood of a car in the ghetto. The poor guy was just driving in the middle of the city and a cow landed on his hood from 1000 feet up.

"I was jes' drivin' along when I looked up an'....DAMN"
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Re: Islander 36

ROFL. See now, in some states you can keep roadkill, but I don't think Illinois is one of them. Thousand pounds of good beef, gone to waste. :-)
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Old 04-11-2012
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Re: Islander 36

WHOAAA..... thread drift!?!?!
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