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-   -   hoisting a large anchor (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/sailnet-faq/61728-hoisting-large-anchor.html)

rosskowh 02-02-2010 10:51 AM

hoisting a large anchor
 
i need to set a 350 lb pyramid anchor from my 30 ft. sailboat. can the main halyard handle this kind of weight? i only need a few inches to clear the deck and lower it into the water. my main halyard is new 5/8 braided nylon which should be more than capable of holding the weight but what about the rest of the rigging? anyone have any experience with something similar???

SVPrairieRose 02-02-2010 11:47 AM

Your 5/8'' halyard would definitely handle that, so will your rig likely however this will not be a fun way of setting this anchor out. I would suggest finding a beach you can drive down on a low tide ditch the anchor and, as the tide is rising you tie your or someone else's boat to the anchor and let the tide do the work. just take it where you want it and cut the line. Please ignore the run-on sentence, its early.


Why do you have a 5/8 halyard on a 30 foot boat?

rosskowh 02-02-2010 12:26 PM

that sounds good but i cant drive down, its mud. please explain more about how you would drag it into place using the boat???

hellosailor 02-02-2010 08:01 PM

Ross, how/where did you plan to load the anchor onto the boat? If you are bringing it down a dock, or on a handtruck, maybe you can instead lash it to an empty 55-gallon drum or other float, and just tow it out instead? (One gallon of seawater weighs about 8.5 pounds.) That way you also can't damage your deck or hull bashing it with the anchor.

The rigging should hold it, after all, you main sheet is "carrying" the whole mass of the boat when under sail. Ditto for the hard parts it is attached to, but I'd still suggest tying on a safety line, or a recovery float, in case something lets go.

jrd22 02-02-2010 08:51 PM

What SV was talking about was putting the anchor somewhere at low tide and then positioning a small boat on top of it as soon as the tide rises enough. You need a line run through something on the anchor so you have both ends to form a loop all the way around the hull of the boat. Tie it off tightly as soon as you can position the boat over the anchor and then as the tide rises, so will the anchor. Then just take it where you want it and cut the line, making sure you have your chain/line attached to the mooring ball or whatever you are using. It's best to use a non-stretch type of line. You obviously need a fairly large tide to do this, but you don't need a very big boat, a 12' aluminum row boat can carry a lot of weight.

SVPrairieRose 02-02-2010 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jrd22 (Post 566467)
What SV was talking about was putting the anchor somewhere at low tide and then positioning a small boat on top of it as soon as the tide rises enough. You need a line run through something on the anchor so you have both ends to form a loop all the way around the hull of the boat. Tie it off tightly as soon as you can position the boat over the anchor and then as the tide rises, so will the anchor. Then just take it where you want it and cut the line, making sure you have your chain/line attached to the mooring ball or whatever you are using. It's best to use a non-stretch type of line. You obviously need a fairly large tide to do this, but you don't need a very big boat, a 12' aluminum row boat can carry a lot of weight.

Yup, that about sums it up. When I dropped my mooring (3000lbs give or take) we did this with a 30 foot crab boat. Worked like a charm. Just be sure that your moooring line/chain is ready to pay out fast and clear and nowhere near people. You will think that you have a moment or two to cut the line and get away, but as soon as your blade touches the line it will "explode". Good luck.

rosskowh 02-02-2010 11:48 PM

good idea, what about just using my boat and tying it off to the bow? there is a public dock with boat launch. if it is hanging from the bow wont it bang against the boat with forward momentum? or the rudder off the stern???

rosskowh 02-03-2010 12:28 AM

i like the drum idea, is a 55 gallon drum enough to float a 350 lb anchor???

SVPrairieRose 02-03-2010 02:11 AM

I would assume that the structural integrity of your boat is sufficient to handle the load, just be sure that your cleat is up to the job. Go slow, real slow and your bow should be just fine. keep the rope as short as possible so you don't snag when leaving the beach.

SVPrairieRose 02-03-2010 02:14 AM

Buoyancy : Weight of air filled drum

according to this website you would definatly be able to use the drum as a lifting source. Might save you the hassle of learning gelcoat repairs.


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