hoisting a large anchor - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Welcome to Sailnet > SailNet FAQ
 Not a Member? 

SailNet FAQ This forum is specifically on the Sailnet Website and how to do certain things on the website. Please note - any other threads will be deleted.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 02-02-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
rosskowh is on a distinguished road
hoisting a large anchor

i need to set a 350 lb pyramid anchor from my 30 ft. sailboat. can the main halyard handle this kind of weight? i only need a few inches to clear the deck and lower it into the water. my main halyard is new 5/8 braided nylon which should be more than capable of holding the weight but what about the rest of the rigging? anyone have any experience with something similar???
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 02-02-2010
SVPrairieRose's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 227
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
SVPrairieRose is on a distinguished road
Your 5/8'' halyard would definitely handle that, so will your rig likely however this will not be a fun way of setting this anchor out. I would suggest finding a beach you can drive down on a low tide ditch the anchor and, as the tide is rising you tie your or someone else's boat to the anchor and let the tide do the work. just take it where you want it and cut the line. Please ignore the run-on sentence, its early.


Why do you have a 5/8 halyard on a 30 foot boat?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 02-02-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
rosskowh is on a distinguished road
that sounds good but i cant drive down, its mud. please explain more about how you would drag it into place using the boat???
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 02-02-2010
hellosailor's Avatar
Plausible Deniability
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,541
Thanks: 2
Thanked 82 Times in 80 Posts
Rep Power: 10
hellosailor has a spectacular aura about hellosailor has a spectacular aura about
Ross, how/where did you plan to load the anchor onto the boat? If you are bringing it down a dock, or on a handtruck, maybe you can instead lash it to an empty 55-gallon drum or other float, and just tow it out instead? (One gallon of seawater weighs about 8.5 pounds.) That way you also can't damage your deck or hull bashing it with the anchor.

The rigging should hold it, after all, you main sheet is "carrying" the whole mass of the boat when under sail. Ditto for the hard parts it is attached to, but I'd still suggest tying on a safety line, or a recovery float, in case something lets go.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 02-02-2010
jrd22's Avatar
Courtney the Dancer
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: San Juan Islands., WA, USA
Posts: 3,815
Thanks: 3
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 14
jrd22 will become famous soon enough
What SV was talking about was putting the anchor somewhere at low tide and then positioning a small boat on top of it as soon as the tide rises enough. You need a line run through something on the anchor so you have both ends to form a loop all the way around the hull of the boat. Tie it off tightly as soon as you can position the boat over the anchor and then as the tide rises, so will the anchor. Then just take it where you want it and cut the line, making sure you have your chain/line attached to the mooring ball or whatever you are using. It's best to use a non-stretch type of line. You obviously need a fairly large tide to do this, but you don't need a very big boat, a 12' aluminum row boat can carry a lot of weight.
__________________
John
SV Laurie Anne

1988 Brewer 40 Pilothouse

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 02-02-2010
SVPrairieRose's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 227
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
SVPrairieRose is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd22 View Post
What SV was talking about was putting the anchor somewhere at low tide and then positioning a small boat on top of it as soon as the tide rises enough. You need a line run through something on the anchor so you have both ends to form a loop all the way around the hull of the boat. Tie it off tightly as soon as you can position the boat over the anchor and then as the tide rises, so will the anchor. Then just take it where you want it and cut the line, making sure you have your chain/line attached to the mooring ball or whatever you are using. It's best to use a non-stretch type of line. You obviously need a fairly large tide to do this, but you don't need a very big boat, a 12' aluminum row boat can carry a lot of weight.
Yup, that about sums it up. When I dropped my mooring (3000lbs give or take) we did this with a 30 foot crab boat. Worked like a charm. Just be sure that your moooring line/chain is ready to pay out fast and clear and nowhere near people. You will think that you have a moment or two to cut the line and get away, but as soon as your blade touches the line it will "explode". Good luck.

Last edited by SVPrairieRose; 02-03-2010 at 02:14 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 02-02-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
rosskowh is on a distinguished road
good idea, what about just using my boat and tying it off to the bow? there is a public dock with boat launch. if it is hanging from the bow wont it bang against the boat with forward momentum? or the rudder off the stern???
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 02-03-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
rosskowh is on a distinguished road
i like the drum idea, is a 55 gallon drum enough to float a 350 lb anchor???
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 02-03-2010
SVPrairieRose's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 227
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
SVPrairieRose is on a distinguished road
I would assume that the structural integrity of your boat is sufficient to handle the load, just be sure that your cleat is up to the job. Go slow, real slow and your bow should be just fine. keep the rope as short as possible so you don't snag when leaving the beach.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 02-03-2010
SVPrairieRose's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 227
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
SVPrairieRose is on a distinguished road
Buoyancy : Weight of air filled drum

according to this website you would definatly be able to use the drum as a lifting source. Might save you the hassle of learning gelcoat repairs.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Second Anchor Tom Wood Seamanship Articles 0 07-06-2004 08:00 PM
The Second Anchor Tom Wood Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 07-06-2004 08:00 PM
Choosing Anchors, Rodes, and Windlasses Liza Copeland Seamanship Articles 0 01-19-2003 07:00 PM
Choosing Anchors, Rodes, and Windlasses Liza Copeland Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 01-19-2003 07:00 PM
Choosing Anchors, Rodes, and Windlasses Liza Copeland Cruising Articles 0 01-19-2003 07:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:15 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.