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bwindrope 08-26-2013 03:17 PM

A harrowing tale from Cape Scott
 
I've just related a harrowing tale of drama that occurred near Cape Scott on the top of Vancouver Island in British Columbia. It is a tale I heard directly from the participants, and one that is cautionary to the hazards we can all face at anchor in high winds.

Stories of Aeolus- Our Gulf 32 Pilothouse: A Harrowing Tale from Cape Scott

May your anchors all hold fast!

katsailor 08-26-2013 03:28 PM

Re: A harrowing tale from Cape Scott
 
YIKES, I just hung a CQR on my bow.

Omatako 08-26-2013 09:45 PM

Re: A harrowing tale from Cape Scott
 
Interesting that the CQR held the second time around . . . .

Faster 08-26-2013 10:26 PM

Re: A harrowing tale from Cape Scott
 
Well told, bw, well told.

We've been having some issues with our 'trusty' CQR of late and are considering one of the new generation anchors for next season. EVERY Rocna user we spoke to this past summer swore by them.. the only complaint was the frequent difficulty in breaking them free when it was time to move on...

katsailor 08-27-2013 09:22 AM

Re: A harrowing tale from Cape Scott
 
I can see difficulty in setting the cqr type if it is laying in it's side. I think it needs to be in an upright configuration for the plow to dig into the bottom.

Of course I could be wrong, I remeber being wrong once before but I think I was mistaken.

bwindrope 08-27-2013 06:58 PM

Re: A harrowing tale from Cape Scott
 
Thanks Faster. I guess I think that this is one of those things where you don't know what you're missing until you change. Humans got along pretty well without telephones for a few thousand years...and we cruised all over with our CQR for years too. But having made the change to the Mantus, I can't believe the difference. I think it is not often that anchor holding is a real issue, and that you can get by with most anything in many situations.

But those aren't the situations that cause us stress as captains. And for those, you want to stay put. To definitively stay put! As for Rocna and Mantus and all that, I don't think there is much practical difference. I went with Mantus because of the concerns with Rocna metal back a while ago and because I liked the whole idea of disassembly, even if I don't often use it that way. But I would expect any of these new designs will perform comparably.

Anyway, good holding to everyone as you voyage along!

kentobin 08-28-2013 02:17 AM

Re: A harrowing tale from Cape Scott
 
I would also like to thank Brian W. for his testimonial on a Mantus anchor that you can also read on his blog. I'm doing a refit and bought one and have been sweating whether or not I made the right decision.

Stories of Aeolus- Our Gulf 32 Pilothouse: Our Mantus anchor proves itself in all conditions at all times

Bene505 08-28-2013 08:20 AM

Re: A harrowing tale from Cape Scott
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by kentobin (Post 1080575)
I would also like to thank Brian W. for his testimonial on a Mantus anchor that you can also read on his blog. I'm doing a refit and bought one and have been sweating whether or not I made the right decision.

Stories of Aeolus- Our Gulf 32 Pilothouse: Our Mantus anchor proves itself in all conditions at all times

Regarding next generation anchors... Since we changed from a CQR to a Manson Supreme, we have to be more careful how quickly we back down when setting the anchor.

Last summer, using our new Manson Supreme anchor, I had the anchor line already snubbed with an old (but thick) dockline. When backing down the chain went taut and the snubber snapped -- more like exploded. That would never happen with the old CQR. I'm so glad that I had a snubber in place. (I think I was about to do some charging in reverse, to keep some load on the engine. When anchoring, I usually back down with just the windlass keeping tension, without using a snubber.)

So now I worry about ripping the windlass from it's mounting on the bow. One has to be gentle with taking up the slack in the chain.

By the way, I used to always use 2 anchors. I'd even go for a sail and leave one anchor (Bruce) behind with a fender tied to the line. One procedure for pick-up was to drop the CQR while motoring up wind to the fender, letting out chain. Then you'd pick up the fender and the inertia of the (slow) boat helped set the CQR. At the right speed and angle to the chain, the bow will just come around when the slack is taken up. Easy double anchoring. Not sure I'd want to do that with a Manson, since I worry more about having a big jerking force on my gear after it sets. Now I feel that I don't need a second anchor, so the point is moot anyway.

Yes, the Manson Supreme is worth it. Not affiliated in any way.

Regards,
Brad

krisscross 08-28-2013 07:54 PM

Re: A harrowing tale from Cape Scott
 
How big was the CQR of the 45 foot boat? Good story for sure.
I sail a small 21 boat but my anchor is for a boat twice that size. Been caught in a few bad situations but my anchor never dragged.

flandria 09-01-2013 10:00 AM

Re: A harrowing tale from Cape Scott
 
While everything turned out OK in the end, we should also note that the panic could have been avoided.

I have been taught that, when an anchor starts dragging, you do not attempt to resolve the problem by increasing scope: you're anchor is not dug in and is unlikely to do so by simply lengthening rode.

If the crew had adhered to this simple notion, they would have hauled anchor before fouling their neighbour, and re-set in hopes of achieving a better result - as in fact happened after they untangled themselves.

Elsewhere I read a caution about backing up too powerfully to a Mantus anchor. Again, the way I was instructed was to stretch the rode by backing up gently, and then to gradually increase power to the maximum necessary: in other words, do not jerk the boat to a violent stop when setting the anchor.

Sounds right?


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