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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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Old 11-18-2004
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coondogger is on a distinguished road
hudson river gybe

As a new owner of a Nonsuch 30, I keep hearing from other big cat owners about something called a Hudson River Gybe. It involves spinning the boat about 270 degrees until the boat is abeam to the wind. So when the sail swings over, it doesn''t ''load'' until you begin to crack off the wind again. Anyone familiar with this gybe?
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Old 11-18-2004
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hudson river gybe

The Hudson River jibe is a very old time way of jibing in the days when boats had unstayed rigs and sailed in the light summer winds of the Hudson Valley. It involves heading up slightly to increase boat speed and then throwing the helm over hard. In small boats it involved holding out the boom on the original tack until the last possible moment. If the boat is swung fast enough the boat is up towards a beam reach before the boom can swing across and fetch up on the sheets.

Now I must point out that a poorly performed Hudson River Jibe imparts enormous loads into the mainsheet attachment points, loads that can be sufficient to damage a boom or tear the mounting points out of the deck. The Hudson River cargo sloops that perfected the Hudson River jibe used what was called a ''Patent Horse''. The patent horse was the attachment point for the mainsheet blocks at the deck. The block was mounted on what was effectively a short traveller with huge springs on either side that kept the traveller car centered and which absorbed the tremendous shock of a jibe. The horse was rivetted or bolted to a huge transverse deck beam that was knee''d to a massive frame. It kind of gives you pause to think about getting the timing wrong on a boat with as big a mainsail and light an attachment point as the Nonsuch, if you see what I mean.

Jeff
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Old 11-21-2004
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hudson river gybe

I believe I''ve seen the Clearwater (Pete S. hudson sloop) do this on the river when wind was sufficient (which its generally not). Or maybe I just interpreted it wrong.
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Old 12-10-2004
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hudson river gybe

If the boat is going thru 270 degrees, it sounds as if you are coming up on the wind (and sheeting in) tacking thru, then shheting out on the new tack. The opposite of "wearing ship" in lieu of tacking when on the wind.
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Old 12-10-2004
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hudson river gybe

In a Hudson River Jibe the boat swings through roughly 135 degrees starting on broad reach, then heading downwind, jibing and then heading up towards a beam reach. It is essentially the same as ''wearing ship'' except that once the boom is across you bear back off again.

Jeff
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Old 12-26-2005
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hudson river gybe

Whoever mentioned the Clearwater has it just right -- the Hudson River Gybe is still practiced aboard that storied vessel -- or at least was as of a few years ago when I last crewed. I don''t believe the CW has any springs to absorb the shock of the mainsheet at the dramatic end of the maneuver, which means the trick is practiced aboard the CW sparingly.
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