Horseshoe rescue bouy.. - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 21 Old 09-22-2006
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"Since the early 80s we have been using the hard plastic rings. I would not want to get hit on the head with one" There's an alternative to that now. You can buy a rescue line in a throwable bag. You hold one end of the line, and throw the bag itself--which is a soft bag containing the rest of the line, and a (soft) weight. The line is a type chosen to easily stow & pay out, and they come in 50' and 75' lengths typically sold under some name like "Throw bag".

The ratty yellow polypro line on a horseshoe is really only good for retrieving the horseshoe if you've drifted too far from the MOB. I don't worry about it fouling because I'm always armed, I can cut it easily. But floating line or not floating, it is VERY important in your MOB plans to remember that no one ever starts the engine until after all lines have been recovered and confirmed as INBOARD so they can't foul the prop. A formal "lines check" needs to have a formal place in your plan, i.e. after your quick drop or turn or whatever you will be doing, and before your recovery.
And personally...if I'm in the water, I'd rather the engine was simply NOT USED. A prop is a meatgrinder, plain and simple. I'd rather wait.
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post #12 of 21 Old 09-22-2006
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Of course, all these attempts at keeping the crew member from sinking before rescue, would not be necessary if he was wearing an inflatable PFD. The Type IV horseshoe would then be thrown as soon as possible, with the purpose of visually marking the area.

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post #13 of 21 Old 09-22-2006
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" if he was wearing an inflatable PFD. "
Assuming it works. I wear one...but I have limited faith in it.

"with the purpose of visually marking the area." Yeah, a flotsam trail. Gotta tell you, if I'm ever the flotsam, I'd be much happier if someone threw a MOB pole in the water. Those cushions and stuff disappear as soon as there's any chop on the water.

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post #14 of 21 Old 09-22-2006
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[/quote] And personally...if I'm in the water, I'd rather the engine was simply NOT USED. A prop is a meatgrinder, plain and simple. I'd rather wait.[/QUOTE]

That's assuming you're still alive after the boat tries to get back to you under sail alone. Here in Puget Sound your life expectancy in the water is measured in minutes (and not very many of them). Throw a cushion or two, deploy the Lifesling, get the sails down, engine on and get back to the COB as fast as possible. Minutes matter. And an inflatable PFD sure beats the heck out of not wearing one. Also, make sure you have practiced all this on a warm day in good weather several times so everyone knows what to do when the cry of "man overboard" comes.
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post #15 of 21 Old 09-22-2006
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Good point, Steve. You fellows in arctic waters [sic] have a special problem that way.
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post #16 of 21 Old 09-22-2006
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I'd agree with Steve that in the colder northern waters some of us sail, speed is critical. In the early spring, the water temps are often in the low 50s or lower...Hypothermia is a serious riske... Of course, the best thing to do is to prevent people from falling in to the water in the first place. Anything else is a distant second place.

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post #17 of 21 Old 09-22-2006
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Anything else is far distant second place. My boat is currently on the hard but when it goes back in the water there will be jacklines which will be used at all times out of the cockpit. I'll now be sailing with my wife and two kids (2 & 3). The kids will be tied on and the best way to keep them from protesting will be for us to be secured as well. I also got to thinking about a COB situation involving me going overboard. I'd be dead, no question. My wife would not be able to handle the kids and the boat well enough to be able to get back to me in time to matter and I'm not sure I can do it if it involves her. The kids we can maybe handle. I'd encourage everyone to really think through the situations on their boats and realistically evaluate the scenarios of various crewmembers going overboard and what would be the procedures for boat handling and getting them back aboard. Take a look at this link if you want to see what can happen both with preparation and without.
http://www.ussailing.org/safety/Stud...ng_history.htm
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post #18 of 21 Old 09-30-2006
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One of the real advantages of the Lifesling is that you don't necessarily have to get the boat close to the MOB. It is designed so that you can get the Lifesling to the MOB, and then use the rope to bring the MOB to the stopped boat. Makes it a lot easier if the skipper falls in, and the crew isn't as good at manuvering the boat as the skipper. That said, the best solution is to prevent people from falling in to begin with.

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post #19 of 21 Old 10-01-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveCox
I also got to thinking about a COB situation involving me going overboard. I'd be dead, no question. My wife would not be able to handle the kids and the boat well enough to be able to get back to me in time to matter and I'm not sure I can do it if it involves her.
I have similar feelings regarding myself relative to the people who crew for me; which is why we plan to do lots MOB practice. After getting comfortable doing it with 3 crew we will reduce it to two people with myself at the helm; then we will practice two people with myself doing nothing (to simulate me as the MOB).

There should be time and thought put into MOB scenarios AND practice including rigging for hoisting someone back aboard. Even if your wife could get the boat back alongside you it would be very difficult if not impossible for her to pull you aboard without a block and tackle (assuming you were injured and could not climb a ladder).

You should practice the procedures for getting the boat back to a MOB; with immediate attention to getting a MOB pole and float overboard, and marking a MOB waypoint on the GPS if it has a quick way to enter it. The ASA instruction method for getting back to a MOB is to trim the sails for a beam reach and turn to a beam reach (spill or sheet in the main depending on upwind or downwind point of sail). The jib should be dropped/furled in most cases unless you have adequate crew. If you turn to a beam reach you can turn 180 without trimming the sails. You turn 180 after falling to a beam reach and then you should be headed directly back to the MOB. Sail below the MOB and turn sharply upwind once you get directly downwind of the MOB (you should be 2-3 boat lenghts below the MOB). The boat will go into irons and you will have scrubbed speed when you made the turn upwind.

You should practice this basic procedure with a float and do dockside practice with hoisting rigging to be sure whoever is left onboard can lift you in after tying you off to the side of the boat and dropping sails.

HTH...
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post #20 of 21 Old 10-01-2006
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One guy I sailed with does his MOB drills using a buoy attached to a used car tire, wrapped in canvas. The buoy is painted brown, and is about the size of a human head, and the tire is weighted to be just a bit less than buoyant. You'd be surprised at how hard it is to haul that sucker out of the water in a MOB drill, even though it only weighs about 45 lbs or so. Spotting it in anything but absolutely flat seas is a bear too. Has it rigged with a strobe for nighttime MOB drills—but he doesn't always turn on the strobe... Evil... but very realistic.

He was a USCGAux instructor and used the same rig to demonstrate how difficult it is to spot a MOB in an emergency.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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