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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 11-30-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailortjk1
Those are the guys you see all the time, you know, the basic jerk on the water.
I don't think it's always a jerk...sometimes it is just a matter of inexperience. I find myself evaluating my own seamanship after every trip out, and especially after a difficult situation. Some of the things I do wrong I realize I will do differently the next time. Other times I am able to realize that I did something better than I would have in the past. If I crash into a dock because of a strong current, the next time I am more careful to allow for it. If my anchor rode gets fouled in the windlass, the next time I monitor its progress more carefully.

Recently we got caught in a rough beat against the wind with gusts above 30. I kicked myself for having not removed the cover on the staysail before heading out into the rough weather and seas. Sending someone on deck to undo the sailcover and attach the halyards in the rough seas was risky and had I been prepared for the strong wind I would have done all of that before heading out. So...next time I'll do that, and of course I'll probably make some other strategic mistake that I will learn from. Maybe the attached halyard will get caught up in the spreader or the sail will accidentally launch in one of the gusts...I do try to anticipate potential problems, and sometimes that works, but other times I have to just make a dumb mistake once to ever really learn anything. As long as nobody gets hurt it's just a part of the process.
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  #12  
Old 11-30-2006
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Great post Pamlicotraveler. Good seamanship isn't just doing something well, it's learning when we don't, and looking for ways to improve what we already do right. I think a lot of that comes from one's general attitude toward sailing. Some are happy just to go out and bash around, and as long as no one is endangered, on their boat or others, that's fine. Some though see it as the constant learning process that it should be. Both for safety's sake and their enjoyment of the boat.
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  #13  
Old 11-30-2006
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Webster's defines good seamanship as "the art and skill of operating a boat." Good seamanship is unmistakeable when you see it. It's practitioner accomplishes everything, including the most difficult tasks, easily, efficiently, and without much ado. It's the goal we all strive for, but that even the most accomplished of us don't always achieve. I've seen the most skilled sailor I've ever known get momentarily distracted while sailing into his slip, and ending up across the slip, rather than in the slip.
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  #14  
Old 11-30-2006
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Firstly, good seamanship is a never ending learning process. That said, I would sum it up as this: Preparation. Knowing your skill set, knowing your boats abilities, knowing your limitations, knowing your boat's limitations and good decision making taking all the above into account.
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  #15  
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Seamanship is thoroughly knowing your vessel, being able to handle it in virtually any situation, always making ready for whatever test the sea may send your way, and always anticipating what might develop from a present situation so that you may act to keep the vessel safe. That latter quality is known in some quarters as forehandedness.
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Old 12-01-2006
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Maybe it is alot like flying. You can basically learn to fly in a short period of time but it takes years of judgement usually gained from bad experiences when NOT to fly.

Jerry
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  #17  
Old 12-01-2006
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camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Right now I am sitting in Northeast NC listening to the Coast Guard in the process of rescuing 3 different boats. One is in the Albermarle sound, the other two are offshore and a helicopter is en route to one.
Anyone watching the weather channel is aware that gale and storm warnings have been posted for over 24 hours and the weather system that is moving across the country is THE major US news story right now. Yet these idiots are offshore in the "graveyard of the atlantic" or deciding to cross a treacherous sound AND...They could have easily chosen to do otherwise instead of pressing on and endangering themselves and the brave Coasties who are flying into the teeth of this thing to save them.
Seems like we might be able to answer "what is seamanship?" by understanding what is not!
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  #18  
Old 12-01-2006
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camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
I couldn't resist posting again. The Coast Guard just brought the Albermarle sound boat in to our marina docks. 6 man crew spending most of the afternoon "rescuing" a boat that was taking on water in the 30-35 knot winds/seas. Did a through hull go? Did something bust? Noooooo....
The boat was a Hunter 45cc and was taking on water every place water could come in the boat from the 5 ft. (maybe) seas and squalls. In particular...the rear sugar scoop storage lids which have no way of being secured were taking in gobs of water when they were pooped by the waves but there were lots of other places too. Engine was swamped and quit! What poor design!! Coasties put a pump aboard and towed her in. I was really impressed with their teamwork and boat handling skills.
Question remains as to why anyone would try to cross the Albermarle today.
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Old 12-01-2006
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Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice
Cam,

please, what are these?? "the rear sugar scoop storage lids" ?

News about the other 2?
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  #20  
Old 12-01-2006
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Good seamanship is not going to sea in a Hunter.
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