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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #21  
Old 12-01-2006
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btrayfors will become famous soon enough btrayfors will become famous soon enough
Amaaaaazing!

What are we attempting here? A brand new 2006 definition of seamanship?

Looks very much like it to me, including a "kinder and gentler" version of what has been the meaning of the term for many centuries. You can look up all the definitions of "seamanship" you like, and never find a reference to "treating others well".

And, I doubt if some of the finest seamen in history (including Capt. Cook, Capt. Bligh, Irving Johnson, Chay Blythe, and dozens of others) could be accused of worrying too much about the tender feelings of others.

Mind you, I'm not saying that one shouldn't be kind to others, merely that that doesn't figure into the classic definition of seamanship.

Rather, seamanship refers to KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, and PRACTICE. Here's what Wikepedia says,

"Seamanship is the art of operating a ship or boat.

It involves a knowledge of a variety of topics and development of specialised skills including:

* Navigation and international maritime law;
* Weather, meteorology and forecasting;
* Watchstanding;
* ship-handling and Small boat handling;
* operation of deck equipment, anchors and cables;
* Ropework and line handling;
* Communications;
* Sailing;
* Engines;
* execution of evolutions such as towing;
* Cargo handling equipment, dangerous cargoes and cargo storage;
* Dealing with emergencies; and
* Survival at sea and Search and Rescue.
* Fire fighting.

The degree of knowledge needed within these areas is dependent upon the nature of the work and the type of vessel employed by a mariner. However, the practice of good seamanship should be the goal of all."

I'm all for treating others well, including wives and mates and kids and anyone else who may be aboard. And, aboard Born Free, everyone is treated as well as can be under prevailing circumstances. SEAMANSHIP helps keep those prevailing circumstances favorable to tender interactions with others.

Bill
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  #22  
Old 12-01-2006
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camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Giuletta...
"sugar scoop" is how those reverse transoms that you can sit on, step on, dive from are referred to. In this case...the fiberglass steps on the Hunter are hinged and lift up so you can store stuff beneath them...much like a cockpit lazarette with an L shape lid. The difference in this case is that the steps which are maybe 1/2 metre above the water line...simply close from their weight with no way to secure them closed! Hope that is understandable!
A Navy ship rescued the 4 people offshore whose boat was sinking...they put pumps aboard the boat but they did not appear to be keeping up so the boat may be lost. The other boat was simply hard aground in Oregon inlet shoals near here but not damaged so it was just towed off.
Well...it looks like summer is over here on the East Coast as the front has come through and temperatures dropped about 30 degrees.
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  #23  
Old 12-01-2006
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camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Bill...LOL....Can we shorten the definition of seamanship then to maintaining prevailing circumstances favorable to tender interactions with others??!! If so...I'll just have a dozen roses sent to the boat and forget about all that complicated stuff!
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Old 12-01-2006
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Camaraderie,

Great idea :-)

Sure would save a lotta time learnin' all that esoteric stuff, and makin' all those stupid mistakes!

Yep, I think winter's on the way. Temp up here broke all records today...75F, but has dropped precipitously in past six hours. Now 47, going to 39 and very windy.

Gonna have to turn on a heater on the boat tomorrow evening.

Bill
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Old 12-01-2006
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Cruisingdad Wow! Amazing comments. Glad to find out that this site has intelligent sailors. Just came on 20 minutes ago.

Having difficulty navigating the site. Everything seems closed off to me except the store and this chat page. Am I doing something wrong?
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Old 12-01-2006
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sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
Bill makes excellent points. Bad seamanship is dangerous, although not infrequently hilarious. Good seamanship is usually the result of practise in all the areas Bill mentioned. And it doesn't usually occur just by chance when you need it. Practising docking single-handed with regular crew on board makes it less of an adventure when you have to do it alone. One can learn to tie a bowline, by two different methods, with a variety of sized line, while sitting on one's couch watching the football game. And, if you hang a piece of small stuff over your towel bar in the bathroom, you can practise a couple times each morning all winter long. By spring you'll be able to do it with your eyes closed. Lots and lots of practise in safe conditions is what makes good seamanship look so "planned out" when the situation is critical.
And Cam, I don't believe whistling or flowers belong on a ship!
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  #27  
Old 12-02-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailaway21
One can learn to tie a bowline, by two different methods,
Only two?

Charlie
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Old 12-08-2006
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Standing O for btrayfors.

Seamanship is not about being nice to others or about planning and practicing. Seamanship is a set of skills. It's not the practicing to learn those skills, it's actually having them. The practice part is called training and it leads to seamanship, but is not seamanship in and of itself.

An able seaman is one who doesn't need instruction in the basic skills - you can tell him to handle the mooring lines on the foredeck and he can do so without further direction - because he has seen enough mooring lines to be able to figure out what he's supposed to do with them without a lot of fancy discussion from the skipper on the efficacious use of a spring line. That's not to say he doesn't need or take orders - on the contrary, an able seaman takes and executes orders efficiently because he is ABLE.
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Old 12-10-2006
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Speaking of what's good and what's bad I saw an interesting segment on Discovery's I Shouldn't Be Alive about a month ago. It was about a crew delivering a sailboat from Maine to Florida. They hit rough seas and capsized somewhere off the coast of North Carolina. Out of a crew of about 6 or 7 only two survived. Does anyone know the details of what could have led to suck a tragic accident? Was poor seamanship involved or was it just bad luck? And does anyone know the size / make of the sailboat involved? If I heard correctly the narrator kept calling the boat "The Trashman" but I did a Google search on that name and got nowhere. From what I could gather on my novice level, sailaway21's seven P's might have been missing.
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  #30  
Old 12-14-2006
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Thought I would bring back this thread from a couple of weeks ago.

As I was reading another thread, this occured to me.

I have stated earlier its easier to define poor seamanship. Than I remember this:

One lazy day on the water, I am sailing along at around 4.5 knots. I look to see a boat approaching in an oncoming direction with lots of activity on deck. As we approach each other, I begin to get a closer look at all of the activity.

This so called sailor has several very young children on board, probably in the seven year range. What the children are doing is running to the bow of the boat and than leeping into the water, surfacing, and swimming as fast as they can to reach the stern boarding ladder before the boat sails past them. Yes, he was still under sail, and no the children were not wearing life preservers.

Now, I know its not my place to tell others what to do, but I think thats crazy. Just can not seem to get that image out of my head.

I would put that under the heading of poor seamanship.
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