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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 02-27-2007
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[QUOTE=christyleigh]
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
What looks like clouds in my Avatar is a fog bank rolling over BI with 50' visibility at the entrance that lasted all the way back to NGBay. Maybe the Radome is a fog magnet -
Someone once commented that you need charts, a radar and an EPIRB. The EPIRB was for situations caused by the inability to read the radar...

Seriously, while radar is a nice thing to have, and in some areas and cruisng grounds quite necessary, it's a very good idea to take a radar course that tells you not only how to read the damn thing, but how to make use of all those sub-menus and options. Most people seem to leave the thing on 16 mile range and some "guard" range related to their fear factor, but you can do a great deal with even an old radar if you learn how to tweak the controls. My personal favourite is finding entrances in seawalls to basins during fog and land-side power outages
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  #12  
Old 02-27-2007
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It just seems like your radome is a Fog magnet... really...they don't cause the fog to form around your boat much....
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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #13  
Old 03-13-2007
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Wow--all this high-speed, low-drag equipment. I must live in the sailing dark ages. I still prefer to use a handheld unit and plot my positions on a good, old-fashioned chart.
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Old 03-13-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flomaster
Wow--all this high-speed, low-drag equipment. I must live in the sailing dark ages. I still prefer to use a handheld unit and plot my positions on a good, old-fashioned chart.
You're not wrong in that and if all you have to remember beyond basic pilotage is keeping your chart datum correct and your Notice to Mariners corrections up to date, you'll be fine, of course.

Unfortunately, chartplotters and super-duper, Star Trek-style displays are favoured in part by people who can't understand or maintain such information. I find that the more seasoned navigators are less enthusiastic about turning navigation into a whiz-bang video game than are the newer-to-boating crowd.

I am fairly pleased that I bought a 1973 boat first (complete with state of the former art Seamaster III cathode tube "fathometer"...still working!) and that my 1993 Trimble GPS still gives me just lat/lon. It forces me to keep tabs on the chart and avoids the sort of errors that an incomplete understanding of navigation can present.

I HATE seeing people at the helm staring into the display of some chartplotter and making seven knots into a crowded bay with nary a glance upward.
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Old 03-13-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente
You're not wrong in that and if all you have to remember beyond basic pilotage is keeping your chart datum correct and your Notice to Mariners corrections up to date, you'll be fine, of course.

Unfortunately, chartplotters and super-duper, Star Trek-style displays are favoured in part by people who can't understand or maintain such information. I find that the more seasoned navigators are less enthusiastic about turning navigation into a whiz-bang video game than are the newer-to-boating crowd.

I am fairly pleased that I bought a 1973 boat first (complete with state of the former art Seamaster III cathode tube "fathometer"...still working!) and that my 1993 Trimble GPS still gives me just lat/lon. It forces me to keep tabs on the chart and avoids the sort of errors that an incomplete understanding of navigation can present.

I HATE seeing people at the helm staring into the display of some chartplotter and making seven knots into a crowded bay with nary a glance upward.
Amen to that... I prefer the Mark I eyeball as my primary navigation tool.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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  #16  
Old 03-13-2007
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We rely on our chartplotter and radar when sailing beyond sight of land, but when cruising closer to shore or remote islands, eyesight sometimes needs a backup . . . especially under conditions such as these:

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  #17  
Old 03-13-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flomaster
Wow--all this high-speed, low-drag equipment. I must live in the sailing dark ages. I still prefer to use a handheld unit and plot my positions on a good, old-fashioned chart.
Yup... that's exactly what I was doing in my earlier post on the way back from MV. I knew exactly where I was and exactly where I was going - Problem is without Radar I didn't know if there was a boat stopped dead in the water in front of me or worse - heading for me at 10kts I want to at least be able to do some last minute avoidance or brace for the crash by electronically seeing whats ahead of me. The paper charts are still next to me with a reasonable amount of DR plotting going on but at least in the NE the GPS/Chartplotter is accurate enough to hit bouys - a hell of a lot more accurate than I ever could be, especially when trying to stare through the totally dis-orienting fog. I've worked in IT for 30 years so I'm used to having my forgetful little pea brain dwarfed by computers. The 'mark I eyeball' is great if you can keep the lenses clear of fog condensation on your - Needed - glasses. I'll take and use every tool I can afford.
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  #18  
Old 03-13-2007
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But TB, you've got plenty of visibility there...at leat 10 or 15 feet..
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #19  
Old 03-13-2007
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No sweat, right SD? That was actually taken in your cruising area - in Nantucket Sound.

My second mate never left his post on the pilothouse roof - his S/O (my daughter), acting out her figurehead role at the bow pulpit, wife/first mate watching the radar screen and me at the aft helm. We made a good team, fortunately anticipating all invisible boat traffic

It finally cleared as we entered Edgrtown Harbor - where we enjoyed clear skies for the remaining week.
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